Coverart for item
The Resource Advanced electromagnetism and vacuum physics, Patrick Cornille

Advanced electromagnetism and vacuum physics, Patrick Cornille

Label
Advanced electromagnetism and vacuum physics
Title
Advanced electromagnetism and vacuum physics
Statement of responsibility
Patrick Cornille
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This book is aimed at a large audience: scientists, engineers, professors and students wise enough to keep a critical stance whenever confronted with the chilling dogmas of contemporary physics. Readers will find a tantalizing amount of material calculated to nurture their thoughts and arouse their suspicion, to some degree at least, on the so-called validity of today's most celebrated physical theories
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cornille, Patrick
Dewey number
529.2
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QC665.T7
LC item number
C67 2003eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
World Scientific series in contemporary chemical physics
Series volume
v. 21
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Electromagnetic waves
  • Electromagnetic theory
  • Vacuum
  • SCIENCE
  • Electromagnetic theory
  • Electromagnetic waves
  • Vacuum
Label
Advanced electromagnetism and vacuum physics, Patrick Cornille
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 723-757) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Introduction and survey -- 2. Wave meaning of the special relativity theory. 2.1. Critical review of the interpretation of special relativity. 2.2. Calculation of the rectilinear accelerated motion of a particle. 2.3. Analysis of the Lorentz-Poincaré transformation. 2.4. Wave meaning of the Lorentz-Poincaré transformation. 2.5. Length contraction and time dilation of a moving body. 2.6. Comparison between Elbaz and De Broglie approaches. 2.7. Different meanings of the Lorentz-Poincaré transformation. 2.8. The concept of simultaneity. 2.9. Definition of Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates -- 3. Change of reference frame. 3.1. Change of reference frame without rotation. 3.2. Change of reference frame with rotation. 3.3. The relativistic invariants and the definition of velocities -- 4. Relativistic and classical mechanics. 4.1. Definition of absolute and relative quantities. 4.2. The addition law of velocities. 4.3. Newton's Third Law and the principle of energy conservation. 4.4. Principles of relativity and covariance in Galilean mechanics. 4.5. Principles of relativity and covariance in relativistic mechanics. 4.6. Definitions of potential and kinetic energy. 4.7. Review of angular momentum definition. 4.8. Experimental tests of partition of forces between internal and external forces -- 5. Experimental tests of special relativity. 5.1. Doppler and aberration effects. 5.2. The Sagnac and Michelson interferometer experiments. 5.3. The Fizeau effect. 5.4. Compton effect. 5.5. The Mössbauer effect. 5.6. The twin paradox. 5.7. The luminiferous ether, a necessity. 5.8. Are the relativistic effects second-order in U/c? -- 6. Partial differential equations of second order. 6.1. Definition of the wave equation. 6.2. Spectral analysis of the wave equation. 6.3. Conservation laws of the wave equation. 6.4. Method of separation of variables. 6.5. Review of the dissipation concept. 6.6. Review of the dispersion concept. 6.7. Hyperbolic equations of second-order and the soliton. 6.8. The Helmholtz theorem. 6.9. Analysis of rotational fields
  • 7. The wave packet concept. 7.1. Point-particle versus wave packet. 7.2. Spectral analysis of the Mackinnon wave packet. 7.3. Acceleration of a wave packet. 7.4. The electron as a wave packet. 7.5. Vibration, wave and propagation. 7.6. Analysis of the size of a signal. 7.7. Quantization of oscillating waves of the ether. 7.8. The relativistic mass-increase with velocity. 7.9. Matter waves. 7.10. Formalism of Lagrange-Hamilton. 7.11. The ray theory -- 8. Electromagnetism. 8.1. The wave-particle duality of light. 8.2. Analysis of the phase concept. 8.3. Analogy between the moving grid formulation and the transmission line theory. 8.4. The integrating factor method. 8.5. Definitions of energy and momentum conservation laws. 8.6. The principle of superposition of fields. 8.7. The energy conservation and the radiation reaction force. 8.8. Different formulations of Maxwell's equations. 8.9. The Lorentz magnetic force and the definition of velocity -- 9. Electromagnetic induction. 9.1. Theoretical analysis of electromagnetic induction. 9.2. Investigation of topological effects in physics. 9.3. Decomposition of the electromagnetic field -- 10. Ampère and Lorentz forces. 10.1. Description of Ampère experiments. 10.2. Comparison of Ampère and Lorentz forces. 10.3. Volume expressions of Ampère and Lorentz forces. 10.4. Calculation of the self-interaction of a circuit. 10.5. Experimental tests of the Ampère force. 10.6. Curvilinear expression of the Ampère force. 10.7. The Weber potential. 10.8. Calculation of the Lorentz force between two charged particles. 10.9. Fluid approach of the stimulated force calculation. 10.10. The Trouton-Noble experiment. 10.11. The Biefeld-Brown experiment. 10.12. Experiments with charged discs. 10.13. The electrostatic pendulum experiment. 10.14. The concept of charge -- 11. The Liénard-Wiechert potential. 11.1. The Liénard-Wiechert potential for a constant velocity. 11.2. Calculation of the Liénard-Wiechert potential for any velocity. 11.3. Calculation of the vector potential in Coulomb gauge
  • 12. Analysis of the electromagnetic field. 12.1. Remarks on the concept of speed limit. 12.2. Conditions for the existence of radiation. 12.3. Critical review of the radiation concept. 12.4. Calculation of the Lamb shift. 12.5. Derivation of retarded and advanced quantities. 12.6. Field calculations from the Liénard-Wiechert formulation. 12.7. Field calculations from the Feynman formulation. 12.8. Field calculations with initial conditions. 12.9. Field calculations far from the charge. 12.10. Relationship between the radiated power and the absorbed power by unit of solid angle. 12.11. Power radiated by a charge -- 13. Photonics versus electromagnetism. 13.1. Definitions and basic concepts in radiative transfer. 13.2. The blackbody radiation. 13.3. Working principle of the laser. 13.4. The correlation function. 13.5. Comparison between photonics and electromagnetism. 13.6. Decomposition of the radiation field in Fourier modes. 13.7. Stochastic electrodynamics -- 14. Radiation of extended sources. 14.1. Analysis of the dipole in uniform motion. 14.2. The radiation of antennas. 14.3. Analysis of the radiative wiggler -- 15. The Green formulation. 15.1. Definition of the Green formulation. 15.2. Analysis of the Green formulation. 15.3. The Helmhotz-Kirchhoff principle. 15.4. Application to electromagnetism in a material medium. 15.5. The Green formulation in an infinite space. 15.6. The Green formulation in space-time -- 16. Wave extinction in a dielectric. 16.1. The polarization vector. 16.2. The Lalor extinction theorem. 16.3. The Sein extinction theorem. 16.4. The Pattanayak-Wolf extinction theorem. 16.5. Application of the extinction theorem -- 17. Plasma equation. 17.1. Moments of the Boltzmann equation. 17.2. The Maxwellian distribution function. 17.3. Hydrodynamic equations of a plasma. 17.4. Link with the Maxwell's equations. 17.5. Analysis of plasma rotations in pinches. 17.6. Plasma confinement and the Bennett condition -- 18. Conclusion
Control code
263131496
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xviii, 774 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789812795229
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)263131496
Label
Advanced electromagnetism and vacuum physics, Patrick Cornille
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 723-757) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Introduction and survey -- 2. Wave meaning of the special relativity theory. 2.1. Critical review of the interpretation of special relativity. 2.2. Calculation of the rectilinear accelerated motion of a particle. 2.3. Analysis of the Lorentz-Poincaré transformation. 2.4. Wave meaning of the Lorentz-Poincaré transformation. 2.5. Length contraction and time dilation of a moving body. 2.6. Comparison between Elbaz and De Broglie approaches. 2.7. Different meanings of the Lorentz-Poincaré transformation. 2.8. The concept of simultaneity. 2.9. Definition of Eulerian and Lagrangian coordinates -- 3. Change of reference frame. 3.1. Change of reference frame without rotation. 3.2. Change of reference frame with rotation. 3.3. The relativistic invariants and the definition of velocities -- 4. Relativistic and classical mechanics. 4.1. Definition of absolute and relative quantities. 4.2. The addition law of velocities. 4.3. Newton's Third Law and the principle of energy conservation. 4.4. Principles of relativity and covariance in Galilean mechanics. 4.5. Principles of relativity and covariance in relativistic mechanics. 4.6. Definitions of potential and kinetic energy. 4.7. Review of angular momentum definition. 4.8. Experimental tests of partition of forces between internal and external forces -- 5. Experimental tests of special relativity. 5.1. Doppler and aberration effects. 5.2. The Sagnac and Michelson interferometer experiments. 5.3. The Fizeau effect. 5.4. Compton effect. 5.5. The Mössbauer effect. 5.6. The twin paradox. 5.7. The luminiferous ether, a necessity. 5.8. Are the relativistic effects second-order in U/c? -- 6. Partial differential equations of second order. 6.1. Definition of the wave equation. 6.2. Spectral analysis of the wave equation. 6.3. Conservation laws of the wave equation. 6.4. Method of separation of variables. 6.5. Review of the dissipation concept. 6.6. Review of the dispersion concept. 6.7. Hyperbolic equations of second-order and the soliton. 6.8. The Helmholtz theorem. 6.9. Analysis of rotational fields
  • 7. The wave packet concept. 7.1. Point-particle versus wave packet. 7.2. Spectral analysis of the Mackinnon wave packet. 7.3. Acceleration of a wave packet. 7.4. The electron as a wave packet. 7.5. Vibration, wave and propagation. 7.6. Analysis of the size of a signal. 7.7. Quantization of oscillating waves of the ether. 7.8. The relativistic mass-increase with velocity. 7.9. Matter waves. 7.10. Formalism of Lagrange-Hamilton. 7.11. The ray theory -- 8. Electromagnetism. 8.1. The wave-particle duality of light. 8.2. Analysis of the phase concept. 8.3. Analogy between the moving grid formulation and the transmission line theory. 8.4. The integrating factor method. 8.5. Definitions of energy and momentum conservation laws. 8.6. The principle of superposition of fields. 8.7. The energy conservation and the radiation reaction force. 8.8. Different formulations of Maxwell's equations. 8.9. The Lorentz magnetic force and the definition of velocity -- 9. Electromagnetic induction. 9.1. Theoretical analysis of electromagnetic induction. 9.2. Investigation of topological effects in physics. 9.3. Decomposition of the electromagnetic field -- 10. Ampère and Lorentz forces. 10.1. Description of Ampère experiments. 10.2. Comparison of Ampère and Lorentz forces. 10.3. Volume expressions of Ampère and Lorentz forces. 10.4. Calculation of the self-interaction of a circuit. 10.5. Experimental tests of the Ampère force. 10.6. Curvilinear expression of the Ampère force. 10.7. The Weber potential. 10.8. Calculation of the Lorentz force between two charged particles. 10.9. Fluid approach of the stimulated force calculation. 10.10. The Trouton-Noble experiment. 10.11. The Biefeld-Brown experiment. 10.12. Experiments with charged discs. 10.13. The electrostatic pendulum experiment. 10.14. The concept of charge -- 11. The Liénard-Wiechert potential. 11.1. The Liénard-Wiechert potential for a constant velocity. 11.2. Calculation of the Liénard-Wiechert potential for any velocity. 11.3. Calculation of the vector potential in Coulomb gauge
  • 12. Analysis of the electromagnetic field. 12.1. Remarks on the concept of speed limit. 12.2. Conditions for the existence of radiation. 12.3. Critical review of the radiation concept. 12.4. Calculation of the Lamb shift. 12.5. Derivation of retarded and advanced quantities. 12.6. Field calculations from the Liénard-Wiechert formulation. 12.7. Field calculations from the Feynman formulation. 12.8. Field calculations with initial conditions. 12.9. Field calculations far from the charge. 12.10. Relationship between the radiated power and the absorbed power by unit of solid angle. 12.11. Power radiated by a charge -- 13. Photonics versus electromagnetism. 13.1. Definitions and basic concepts in radiative transfer. 13.2. The blackbody radiation. 13.3. Working principle of the laser. 13.4. The correlation function. 13.5. Comparison between photonics and electromagnetism. 13.6. Decomposition of the radiation field in Fourier modes. 13.7. Stochastic electrodynamics -- 14. Radiation of extended sources. 14.1. Analysis of the dipole in uniform motion. 14.2. The radiation of antennas. 14.3. Analysis of the radiative wiggler -- 15. The Green formulation. 15.1. Definition of the Green formulation. 15.2. Analysis of the Green formulation. 15.3. The Helmhotz-Kirchhoff principle. 15.4. Application to electromagnetism in a material medium. 15.5. The Green formulation in an infinite space. 15.6. The Green formulation in space-time -- 16. Wave extinction in a dielectric. 16.1. The polarization vector. 16.2. The Lalor extinction theorem. 16.3. The Sein extinction theorem. 16.4. The Pattanayak-Wolf extinction theorem. 16.5. Application of the extinction theorem -- 17. Plasma equation. 17.1. Moments of the Boltzmann equation. 17.2. The Maxwellian distribution function. 17.3. Hydrodynamic equations of a plasma. 17.4. Link with the Maxwell's equations. 17.5. Analysis of plasma rotations in pinches. 17.6. Plasma confinement and the Bennett condition -- 18. Conclusion
Control code
263131496
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xviii, 774 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789812795229
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)263131496

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