Coverart for item
The Resource American political writing during the founding era, 1760-1805, Charles S. Hyneman, Donald S. Lutz

American political writing during the founding era, 1760-1805, Charles S. Hyneman, Donald S. Lutz

Label
American political writing during the founding era, 1760-1805
Title
American political writing during the founding era, 1760-1805
Statement of responsibility
Charles S. Hyneman, Donald S. Lutz
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Cataloging source
DLC
Index
index present
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1900-1985
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Hyneman, Charles S.
  • Lutz, Donald S
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • United States
  • United States
Label
American political writing during the founding era, 1760-1805, Charles S. Hyneman, Donald S. Lutz
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Includes index
Bibliography note
Bibliography: volume 2, pages 1349-1393
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • V.2 -- An elector. "To the free electors of this town." Boston, 1788 -- Electioneering as a corrupt practice -- Benjamin Franklin: "An account of the supremest court of judicature in Pennsylvania viz. The court of the press," Philadelphia, 1789 -- The limits of freedom of the press -- [Anonymous]: "Ambition," Charleston, 1789 -- The importance of ambition for excellence -- Benevolous, "Poverty," Charleston, 1789 -- The effects of poverty -- David Ramsay, "The history of the American Revolution" (selections), Philadelphia, 1789 -- Robert Coram, "Political inquiries, to which is added a plan for the establishment of schools throughout the United States," Wilmington, 1791 -- Joel Barlow, "A letter to the national convention of France on the defects in the Constitution of 1791," New York, 1792 -- Equality and effective popular control of government -- Timothy Stone, "Election Sermon," Hartford, 1792 -- Liberty, leadership, and community
  • David Rice, "Slavery inconsistent with justice and good policy," Augusta, Kentucky, 1792 -- Theodore Dwight, "An oration, spoken before the Connecticut society, for the promotion of freedom and the relief of persons unlawfully holden in bondage," Hartford, 1792 -- The effects of slavery on slaves, masters, and society -- [Timothy Ford] Americanus, "The Constitutionalist: Or, an inquiry how far it is expedient and proper to alter the Constitution of South Carolina," Charleston, 1794 -- Representation -- James Kent, "An introductory lecture to a course of law lectures," New York, 1794 -- Justifies judicial review by Supreme Court -- Samuel Williams, "The natural and civil history of Vermont (Chapters XIII, XIV, and XV), Walpole, New Hampshire, 1794 -- How material circumstances affect culture and politics -- [John Leland] Jack Nips, "The Yankee spy," Boston, 1794 -- Freedom of religion -- Peres [Perez] Fobes, "An election sermon," Boston, 1794 -- Freedom of speech, respect for public officials -- Justice [Jacob] Rush, "The nature and importance of an oath -- the charge to a jury," Rutland, Vermont, 1796 -- Oaths and political obligation
  • Nathanael Emmons, "A discourse delivered on the national fast," Wrentham, Massachusetts, 1799 -- Civil disobedience and obedience to constituted authorities -- Jonathan Maxcy, "An oration," Providence, 1799 -- Liberty and equality -- Alexander Addison, "Analysis of the report of the committee of the Virginia Assembly," Philadelphia, 1800 -- Limits to freedom of the press, compact theory of government -- Joel Barlow, "To his fellow citizens of the United States, Letter II: On certain political measures proposed to their consideration," Philadelphia, 1801 -- Federalism -- An impartial citizen, "A dissertation upon the constitutional freedom of the press," Boston, 1801 -- Jeremiah Atwater, "A sermon," Middlebury, Vermont, 1801 -- Liberty, republican government, human nature, and virtue -- John Leland, "The Connecticut dissenters' strong box: No. 1," New London, Connecticut, 1802 -- Religious freedom
  • Zephaniah Swift Moore, "An oration on the anniversary of the independence of the United States of America," Worcester, Massachusetts, 1802 -- Public opinion, virtue, education, and popular government -- Noah Webster, "An oration on the anniversary of the Declaration of Independence," New Haven, 1802 -- The underlying principles and design of American government -- Samuel Kendal, "Religion the only sure basis of free government," Boston, 1804 -- Dependence of government upon religious sentiment -- James Wilson, "On municipal law," Philadelphia, 1804 -- Law, consent, and political obligation -- Fisher Ames, "The dangers of American liberty," Boston, 1805 -- Equality, faction, bigness, corruption, community, virtue
Control code
9110659
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
2 volumes (xviii, 1417 pages)
Isbn
9780865970427
Isbn Type
(pbk. : v. 1)
Lccn
82024884
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(WaOLN)653229
Label
American political writing during the founding era, 1760-1805, Charles S. Hyneman, Donald S. Lutz
Publication
Note
Includes index
Bibliography note
Bibliography: volume 2, pages 1349-1393
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • V.2 -- An elector. "To the free electors of this town." Boston, 1788 -- Electioneering as a corrupt practice -- Benjamin Franklin: "An account of the supremest court of judicature in Pennsylvania viz. The court of the press," Philadelphia, 1789 -- The limits of freedom of the press -- [Anonymous]: "Ambition," Charleston, 1789 -- The importance of ambition for excellence -- Benevolous, "Poverty," Charleston, 1789 -- The effects of poverty -- David Ramsay, "The history of the American Revolution" (selections), Philadelphia, 1789 -- Robert Coram, "Political inquiries, to which is added a plan for the establishment of schools throughout the United States," Wilmington, 1791 -- Joel Barlow, "A letter to the national convention of France on the defects in the Constitution of 1791," New York, 1792 -- Equality and effective popular control of government -- Timothy Stone, "Election Sermon," Hartford, 1792 -- Liberty, leadership, and community
  • David Rice, "Slavery inconsistent with justice and good policy," Augusta, Kentucky, 1792 -- Theodore Dwight, "An oration, spoken before the Connecticut society, for the promotion of freedom and the relief of persons unlawfully holden in bondage," Hartford, 1792 -- The effects of slavery on slaves, masters, and society -- [Timothy Ford] Americanus, "The Constitutionalist: Or, an inquiry how far it is expedient and proper to alter the Constitution of South Carolina," Charleston, 1794 -- Representation -- James Kent, "An introductory lecture to a course of law lectures," New York, 1794 -- Justifies judicial review by Supreme Court -- Samuel Williams, "The natural and civil history of Vermont (Chapters XIII, XIV, and XV), Walpole, New Hampshire, 1794 -- How material circumstances affect culture and politics -- [John Leland] Jack Nips, "The Yankee spy," Boston, 1794 -- Freedom of religion -- Peres [Perez] Fobes, "An election sermon," Boston, 1794 -- Freedom of speech, respect for public officials -- Justice [Jacob] Rush, "The nature and importance of an oath -- the charge to a jury," Rutland, Vermont, 1796 -- Oaths and political obligation
  • Nathanael Emmons, "A discourse delivered on the national fast," Wrentham, Massachusetts, 1799 -- Civil disobedience and obedience to constituted authorities -- Jonathan Maxcy, "An oration," Providence, 1799 -- Liberty and equality -- Alexander Addison, "Analysis of the report of the committee of the Virginia Assembly," Philadelphia, 1800 -- Limits to freedom of the press, compact theory of government -- Joel Barlow, "To his fellow citizens of the United States, Letter II: On certain political measures proposed to their consideration," Philadelphia, 1801 -- Federalism -- An impartial citizen, "A dissertation upon the constitutional freedom of the press," Boston, 1801 -- Jeremiah Atwater, "A sermon," Middlebury, Vermont, 1801 -- Liberty, republican government, human nature, and virtue -- John Leland, "The Connecticut dissenters' strong box: No. 1," New London, Connecticut, 1802 -- Religious freedom
  • Zephaniah Swift Moore, "An oration on the anniversary of the independence of the United States of America," Worcester, Massachusetts, 1802 -- Public opinion, virtue, education, and popular government -- Noah Webster, "An oration on the anniversary of the Declaration of Independence," New Haven, 1802 -- The underlying principles and design of American government -- Samuel Kendal, "Religion the only sure basis of free government," Boston, 1804 -- Dependence of government upon religious sentiment -- James Wilson, "On municipal law," Philadelphia, 1804 -- Law, consent, and political obligation -- Fisher Ames, "The dangers of American liberty," Boston, 1805 -- Equality, faction, bigness, corruption, community, virtue
Control code
9110659
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
2 volumes (xviii, 1417 pages)
Isbn
9780865970427
Isbn Type
(pbk. : v. 1)
Lccn
82024884
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
System control number
(WaOLN)653229

Library Locations

    • University of Missouri-St. Louis Libraries DepositoryBorrow it
      2908 Lemone Blvd, Columbia, MO, 65201, US
      38.919360 -92.291620
    • Thomas Jefferson LibraryBorrow it
      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
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