Coverart for item
The Resource Austrian phenomenology : Brentano, Husserl, Meinong, and others on mind and object, Robin D. Rollinger

Austrian phenomenology : Brentano, Husserl, Meinong, and others on mind and object, Robin D. Rollinger

Label
Austrian phenomenology : Brentano, Husserl, Meinong, and others on mind and object
Title
Austrian phenomenology
Title remainder
Brentano, Husserl, Meinong, and others on mind and object
Statement of responsibility
Robin D. Rollinger
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"While many of the phenomenological currents in philosophy allegedly utilize a peculiar method, the type under consideration here is characterized by Franz Brentano's ambition to make philosophy scientific by adopting no other method but that of natural science. Brentano became particularly influential in teaching his students (such as Carl Stumpf, Anton Marty, Alexius Meinong, and Edmund Husserl) his descriptive psychology, which is concerned with mind as intentionally directed at objects. As Brentano and his students continued in their investigations in descriptive psychology, another side of Austrian phenomenology, namely object theory, became more and more prominent. The philosophical orientation under consideration in this collection of essays is accordingly a two-sided discipline, concerned with both mind and objects, and applicable to various areas of philosophy such as epistemology, philosophy of language, value theory, and ontology."--Jacket
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Rollinger, R. D
Dewey number
142.7
Index
index present
LC call number
B3181
LC item number
.R65 2008
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Phenomenology & mind
Series volume
Bd. 12
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Philosophy, Austrian
  • Phenomenology
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • Phenomenology
  • Philosophy, Austrian
  • Philosophie
  • Phänomenologie
  • Fenomenologie
  • Intentionaliteit
  • Österreich
Label
Austrian phenomenology : Brentano, Husserl, Meinong, and others on mind and object, Robin D. Rollinger
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 301-326)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • INTRODUCTION; 1. The Subject Matter of Austrian Phenomenology; 2. The Method of Austrian Phenomenology; 3. Austrian Phenomenology and Philosophy; 4. Major Figures of Austrian Phenomenology; BRENTANO AND HUSSERL ON IMAGINATION; 1. Introduction; 2. Brentano on Imagination; 3. Husserl on Imagination; 3.1. Methodological Considerations; 3.2. Presentations; 3.3. Sensations and Phantasms; 3.4. The Phantasy Image; 3.5. Phantasy Presentations as Intuitive; 3.6. Critique of the Doctrine of Original Association; 4. Conclusion; NAMES, STATEMENTS, AND MIND-FUNCTIONS IN HUSSERL'S LOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS
  • 1. Introduction2. Manifestation, Meaning, and Reference; 3. Positing Names and Non-Positing Statements; 4. Excursus: Inner Perception in the Logical Investigations; 5. Fulfillment of Names and Statements; 6. Concluding Remarks; MARTY ON LINGUISTIC EXPRESSIONS AND MIND-FUNCTIONS; 1. Introduction; 2. Ontological Requirements; 3. Mind-Functions in Correlation with Linguistic Expressions; 4. Mentalism and Introspectionism; 5. Conclusion; HUSSERL'S ELEMENTARY LOGIC: THE 1896 LECTURES IN THEIR NINETEENTH CENTURY CONTEXT; 1. Introduction; 3. Logic as Theory of Science; 3. Concepts; 4. Propositions
  • 5. Inferences6. Conclusion; MEINONG ON THE OBJECTS OF SENSATION; 1. Introduction; 2. Brentano on Sensory Contents; 3. From Physical Phenomena to Objects of Sensation; 4. Sensory Objects of Higher Order; 5. The Nonexistence of Sensory Objects; 6. A Priori Knowledge about Sensory Objects; 7. Comparison with Stumpf; 8. Comparison with Husserl; 9. Conclusion; STUMPF ON PHENOMENA AND PHENOMENOLOGY; 1. Introduction; 2. Phenomena; 3. Phenomenology; 4. Conclusion; BRENTANO AND MEINONG; 1. Introduction; 2. Points of Divergence; 2.1. Theory of Relations; 2.2. Intensity
  • 2.3. Immediate Evidence of Surmise2.4. Feeling and Desire; 2.5. Content and Object; 2.6. Judgments; 2.7. Presentations; 2.8. Time-Consciousness; 2.9. Assumptions; 2.10. Object Theory; 2.11. Value Theory; 2.12. Phenomena and Consciousness; 3. Philosophical Affinity; HUSSERL AND CORNELIUS: PHENOMENOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGY, AND EPISTEMOLOGY; 1. Introduction; 2. Hans Cornelius (1863-1947); 3. Husserl's Critique of Attempt at a Theory of Existential Judgments; 3.1 Various Types of Problems concerning Judgments; 3.2 Perceiving and Distinguishing; 3.3 Content, Object, and Meaning
  • 3.4 Phantasms and Sensations3.5 Memory Images; 3.6. Negation; 4. Husserl's Critique of Psychology as an Experiential Science; 4.1 The Principle of Thought Economy; 4.2 Abstraction and General Ideas; 4.3 The Experiential Origin of Universally Valid Judgments; 5. Cornelius' Reply and Correspondence with Husserl; 5.1 Psychology and Epistemology; 5.2 Correspondence; 5.3. The Subject Matter of Phenomenology; 6. Conclusion; MEINONG ON PERCEPTION AND OBJECTIVES; AUSTRIAN THEORIES OF JUDGMENT: BOLZANO, BRENTANO, MEINONG, AND HUSSERL; 1. Introduction; 2. Bolzano; 3. Brentano; 4. Meinong; 5. Husserl
Control code
854185678
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 326 pages).
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783110325485
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)854185678
Label
Austrian phenomenology : Brentano, Husserl, Meinong, and others on mind and object, Robin D. Rollinger
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 301-326)
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • INTRODUCTION; 1. The Subject Matter of Austrian Phenomenology; 2. The Method of Austrian Phenomenology; 3. Austrian Phenomenology and Philosophy; 4. Major Figures of Austrian Phenomenology; BRENTANO AND HUSSERL ON IMAGINATION; 1. Introduction; 2. Brentano on Imagination; 3. Husserl on Imagination; 3.1. Methodological Considerations; 3.2. Presentations; 3.3. Sensations and Phantasms; 3.4. The Phantasy Image; 3.5. Phantasy Presentations as Intuitive; 3.6. Critique of the Doctrine of Original Association; 4. Conclusion; NAMES, STATEMENTS, AND MIND-FUNCTIONS IN HUSSERL'S LOGICAL INVESTIGATIONS
  • 1. Introduction2. Manifestation, Meaning, and Reference; 3. Positing Names and Non-Positing Statements; 4. Excursus: Inner Perception in the Logical Investigations; 5. Fulfillment of Names and Statements; 6. Concluding Remarks; MARTY ON LINGUISTIC EXPRESSIONS AND MIND-FUNCTIONS; 1. Introduction; 2. Ontological Requirements; 3. Mind-Functions in Correlation with Linguistic Expressions; 4. Mentalism and Introspectionism; 5. Conclusion; HUSSERL'S ELEMENTARY LOGIC: THE 1896 LECTURES IN THEIR NINETEENTH CENTURY CONTEXT; 1. Introduction; 3. Logic as Theory of Science; 3. Concepts; 4. Propositions
  • 5. Inferences6. Conclusion; MEINONG ON THE OBJECTS OF SENSATION; 1. Introduction; 2. Brentano on Sensory Contents; 3. From Physical Phenomena to Objects of Sensation; 4. Sensory Objects of Higher Order; 5. The Nonexistence of Sensory Objects; 6. A Priori Knowledge about Sensory Objects; 7. Comparison with Stumpf; 8. Comparison with Husserl; 9. Conclusion; STUMPF ON PHENOMENA AND PHENOMENOLOGY; 1. Introduction; 2. Phenomena; 3. Phenomenology; 4. Conclusion; BRENTANO AND MEINONG; 1. Introduction; 2. Points of Divergence; 2.1. Theory of Relations; 2.2. Intensity
  • 2.3. Immediate Evidence of Surmise2.4. Feeling and Desire; 2.5. Content and Object; 2.6. Judgments; 2.7. Presentations; 2.8. Time-Consciousness; 2.9. Assumptions; 2.10. Object Theory; 2.11. Value Theory; 2.12. Phenomena and Consciousness; 3. Philosophical Affinity; HUSSERL AND CORNELIUS: PHENOMENOLOGY, PSYCHOLOGY, AND EPISTEMOLOGY; 1. Introduction; 2. Hans Cornelius (1863-1947); 3. Husserl's Critique of Attempt at a Theory of Existential Judgments; 3.1 Various Types of Problems concerning Judgments; 3.2 Perceiving and Distinguishing; 3.3 Content, Object, and Meaning
  • 3.4 Phantasms and Sensations3.5 Memory Images; 3.6. Negation; 4. Husserl's Critique of Psychology as an Experiential Science; 4.1 The Principle of Thought Economy; 4.2 Abstraction and General Ideas; 4.3 The Experiential Origin of Universally Valid Judgments; 5. Cornelius' Reply and Correspondence with Husserl; 5.1 Psychology and Epistemology; 5.2 Correspondence; 5.3. The Subject Matter of Phenomenology; 6. Conclusion; MEINONG ON PERCEPTION AND OBJECTIVES; AUSTRIAN THEORIES OF JUDGMENT: BOLZANO, BRENTANO, MEINONG, AND HUSSERL; 1. Introduction; 2. Bolzano; 3. Brentano; 4. Meinong; 5. Husserl
Control code
854185678
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 326 pages).
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9783110325485
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)854185678

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