Coverart for item
The Resource Becoming Wordsworthian : A Performative Aesthetic, (electronic resource:)

Becoming Wordsworthian : A Performative Aesthetic, (electronic resource:)

Label
Becoming Wordsworthian : A Performative Aesthetic
Title
Becoming Wordsworthian
Title remainder
A Performative Aesthetic
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • Annotation
  • Annotation
Cataloging source
BIP US
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1957-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Fay, Elizabeth A.
Dewey number
821/.7
Intended audience
College Audience
Intended audience source
University of Massachusetts Press
LC call number
PR5892.A34F39 1995
Summary expansion
  • "This innovative book explores the hypothesis that "Wordsworth the Poet" is an imaginative projection in which both William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy collaborated, developing a persona that the siblings strove to inhabit. Because William was its principal enactor, both publicly and privately, poetically and experientially, his tendency was to sublimate Dorothy into an audible but invisible muse, located just behind him. Dorothy, however, always imagined herself in a collaborative or twinned relation to William, even when he was absent. She experienced the Wordsworthian role as increasingly alienating, more an aesthetic performance to be enacted at will, whereas William found the role ever more natural and inseparable from himself." "This book explores the ways in which the Wordsworths were particularly suited to develop their collaborative persona, the literary fictions they drew on, and the value they derived from such a concerted and utopian effort. The author bases her work on well-known Wordsworthian texts, as well as little-read lyrics and essays of William and the comparatively unknown oeuvre of Dorothy."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
  • "This innovative book explores the hypothesis that "Wordsworth the Poet" is an imaginative projection in which both William Wordsworth and his sister Dorothy collaborated, developing a persona that the siblings strove to inhabit. Because William was its principal enactor, both publicly and privately, poetically and experientially, his tendency was to sublimate Dorothy into an audible but invisible muse, located just behind him. Dorothy, however, always imagined herself in a collaborative or twinned relation to William, even when he was absent. She experienced the Wordsworthian role as increasingly alienating, more an aesthetic performance to be enacted at will, whereas William found the role ever more natural and inseparable from himself." "This book explores the ways in which the Wordsworths were particularly suited to develop their collaborative persona, the literary fictions they drew on, and the value they derived from such a concerted and utopian effort. The author bases her work on well-known Wordsworthian texts, as well as little-read lyrics and essays of William and the comparatively unknown oeuvre of Dorothy."--BOOK JACKET.Title Summary field provided by Blackwell North America, Inc. All Rights Reserved
Label
Becoming Wordsworthian : A Performative Aesthetic, (electronic resource:)
Instantiates
Publication
Control code
OCM1bookssj0000109643
Dimensions
09.290 x 06.240 in.
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
288 p.
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9780870239601
Lccn
94037565
Other control number
9780870239601
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0000109643
Label
Becoming Wordsworthian : A Performative Aesthetic, (electronic resource:)
Publication
Control code
OCM1bookssj0000109643
Dimensions
09.290 x 06.240 in.
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
288 p.
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9780870239601
Lccn
94037565
Other control number
9780870239601
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0000109643

Library Locations

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      38.710138 -90.311107
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