Coverart for item
The Resource Building the Ohio innovation Economy : summary of a symposium, Charles W. Wessner, rapporteur ; Committee on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives, Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, Policy and Global Affairs, National Research Council of the National Academies, (electronic resource)

Building the Ohio innovation Economy : summary of a symposium, Charles W. Wessner, rapporteur ; Committee on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives, Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, Policy and Global Affairs, National Research Council of the National Academies, (electronic resource)

Label
Building the Ohio innovation Economy : summary of a symposium
Title
Building the Ohio innovation Economy
Title remainder
summary of a symposium
Statement of responsibility
Charles W. Wessner, rapporteur ; Committee on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives, Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, Policy and Global Affairs, National Research Council of the National Academies
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • The symposium reported in this volume convened state officials and staff, business leaders, and leading national figures in early-stage finance, technology, engineering, education, and state and federal policies to review challenges, plans, and opportunities for innovation-led growth in Ohio. The symposium also included an assessment of the state's industrial, and human resources; identification of key sectors and issues; and a discussion of how the state might leverage its universities, development organizations, philanthropic foundations, and national programs focused on manufacturing and innovation to support its economic development goals. Given the location of the conference, a number of speakers highlighted regional initiatives in northeast Ohio although initiatives elsewhere in the state were also given prominence. The scope of the conference, as with any single meeting, was necessarily limited. The conference rightly placed great emphasis on a wide variety of initiatives underway in Ohio to spur entrepreneurship and grow new industries rather than on how existing large employers are adapting to global competition. Similarly, little attention was focused on the state's investments in its broadband infrastructure, even though this effort is a key element in the state's future capabilities. The role of large employers and automotive supply chains are arguably understated, but this reflects the conference focus. At the same time, the conference did take up initiatives underway at some of Ohio's "traditional" manufacturing industries. For example, the report captures the key factors leading to the turnaround of Timken, a leading manufacturer of steel bearings, and also addresses the new commercial thrust of the region's well-established medical industry
  • "Since 1991, the National Research Council, under the auspices of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, has undertaken a program of activities to improve policymakers' understandings of the interconnections of science, technology, and economic policy and their importance for the American economy and its international competitive position. The Board's activities have corresponded with increased policy recognition of the importance of knowledge and technology to economic growth. One important element of STEP's analysis concerns the growth and impact of foreign technology programs. U.S. competitors have launched substantial programs to support new technologies, small firm development, and consortia among large and small firms to strengthen national and regional positions in strategic sectors. Some governments overseas have chosen to provide public support to innovation to overcome the market imperfections apparent in their national innovation systems. They believe that the rising costs and risks associated with new potentially high-payoff technologies, and the growing global dispersal of technical expertise, underscore the need for national R&D programs to support new and existing high-technology firms within their borders. Similarly, many state and local governments and regional entities in the United States are undertaking a variety of initiatives to enhance local economic development and employment through investment programs designed to attract knowledge-based industries and grow innovation clusters. These state and regional programs and associated policy measures are of great interest for their potential contributions to growth and U.S. competitiveness and for the "best practice" lessons that they offer for other state and regional programs. STEP's project on State and Regional Innovation Initiatives is intended to generate a better understanding of the challenges associated with the transition of research into products, the practices associated with successful state and regional programs, and their interaction with federal programs and private initiatives. The study seeks to achieve this goal through a series of complementary assessments of state, regional, and federal initiatives; analyses of specific industries and technologies from the perspective of crafting supportive public policy at all three levels; and outreach to multiple stakeholders. Building the Ohio Innovation Economy: Summary of a Symposium explains the of the study, which is to improve the operation of state and regional programs and, collectively, enhance their impact."-- Publisher's description
  • The symposium reported in this volume convened state officials and staff, business leaders, and leading national figures in early-stage finance, technology, engineering, education, and state and federal policies to review challenges, plans, and opportunities for innovation-led growth in Ohio. The symposium also included an assessment of the state's industrial, and human resources; identification of key sectors and issues; and a discussion of how the state might leverage its universities, development organizations, philanthropic foundations, and national programs focused on manufacturing and innovation to support its economic development goals. Given the location of the conference, a number of speakers highlighted regional initiatives in northeast Ohio although initiatives elsewhere in the state were also given prominence. The scope of the conference, as with any single meeting, was necessarily limited. The conference rightly placed great emphasis on a wide variety of initiatives underway in Ohio to spur entrepreneurship and grow new industries rather than on how existing large employers are adapting to global competition. Similarly, little attention was focused on the state's investments in its broadband infrastructure, even though this effort is a key element in the state's future capabilities. The role of large employers and automotive supply chains are arguably understated, but this reflects the conference focus. At the same time, the conference did take up initiatives underway at some of Ohio's "traditional" manufacturing industries. For example, the report captures the key factors leading to the turnaround of Timken, a leading manufacturer of steel bearings, and also addresses the new commercial thrust of the region's well-established medical industry
  • "Since 1991, the National Research Council, under the auspices of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, has undertaken a program of activities to improve policymakers' understandings of the interconnections of science, technology, and economic policy and their importance for the American economy and its international competitive position. The Board's activities have corresponded with increased policy recognition of the importance of knowledge and technology to economic growth. One important element of STEP's analysis concerns the growth and impact of foreign technology programs. U.S. competitors have launched substantial programs to support new technologies, small firm development, and consortia among large and small firms to strengthen national and regional positions in strategic sectors. Some governments overseas have chosen to provide public support to innovation to overcome the market imperfections apparent in their national innovation systems. They believe that the rising costs and risks associated with new potentially high-payoff technologies, and the growing global dispersal of technical expertise, underscore the need for national R&D programs to support new and existing high-technology firms within their borders. Similarly, many state and local governments and regional entities in the United States are undertaking a variety of initiatives to enhance local economic development and employment through investment programs designed to attract knowledge-based industries and grow innovation clusters. These state and regional programs and associated policy measures are of great interest for their potential contributions to growth and U.S. competitiveness and for the "best practice" lessons that they offer for other state and regional programs. STEP's project on State and Regional Innovation Initiatives is intended to generate a better understanding of the challenges associated with the transition of research into products, the practices associated with successful state and regional programs, and their interaction with federal programs and private initiatives. The study seeks to achieve this goal through a series of complementary assessments of state, regional, and federal initiatives; analyses of specific industries and technologies from the perspective of crafting supportive public policy at all three levels; and outreach to multiple stakeholders. Building the Ohio Innovation Economy: Summary of a Symposium explains the of the study, which is to improve the operation of state and regional programs and, collectively, enhance their impact."-- Publisher's description
  • The symposium reported in this volume convened state officials and staff, business leaders, and leading national figures in early-stage finance, technology, engineering, education, and state and federal policies to review challenges, plans, and opportunities for innovation-led growth in Ohio. The symposium also included an assessment of the state's industrial, and human resources; identification of key sectors and issues; and a discussion of how the state might leverage its universities, development organizations, philanthropic foundations, and national programs focused on manufacturing and innovation to support its economic development goals. Given the location of the conference, a number of speakers highlighted regional initiatives in northeast Ohio although initiatives elsewhere in the state were also given prominence. The scope of the conference, as with any single meeting, was necessarily limited. The conference rightly placed great emphasis on a wide variety of initiatives underway in Ohio to spur entrepreneurship and grow new industries rather than on how existing large employers are adapting to global competition. Similarly, little attention was focused on the state's investments in its broadband infrastructure, even though this effort is a key element in the state's future capabilities. The role of large employers and automotive supply chains are arguably understated, but this reflects the conference focus. At the same time, the conference did take up initiatives underway at some of Ohio's "traditional" manufacturing industries. For example, the report captures the key factors leading to the turnaround of Timken, a leading manufacturer of steel bearings, and also addresses the new commercial thrust of the region's well-established medical industry
  • "Since 1991, the National Research Council, under the auspices of the Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, has undertaken a program of activities to improve policymakers' understandings of the interconnections of science, technology, and economic policy and their importance for the American economy and its international competitive position. The Board's activities have corresponded with increased policy recognition of the importance of knowledge and technology to economic growth. One important element of STEP's analysis concerns the growth and impact of foreign technology programs. U.S. competitors have launched substantial programs to support new technologies, small firm development, and consortia among large and small firms to strengthen national and regional positions in strategic sectors. Some governments overseas have chosen to provide public support to innovation to overcome the market imperfections apparent in their national innovation systems. They believe that the rising costs and risks associated with new potentially high-payoff technologies, and the growing global dispersal of technical expertise, underscore the need for national R&D programs to support new and existing high-technology firms within their borders. Similarly, many state and local governments and regional entities in the United States are undertaking a variety of initiatives to enhance local economic development and employment through investment programs designed to attract knowledge-based industries and grow innovation clusters. These state and regional programs and associated policy measures are of great interest for their potential contributions to growth and U.S. competitiveness and for the "best practice" lessons that they offer for other state and regional programs. STEP's project on State and Regional Innovation Initiatives is intended to generate a better understanding of the challenges associated with the transition of research into products, the practices associated with successful state and regional programs, and their interaction with federal programs and private initiatives. The study seeks to achieve this goal through a series of complementary assessments of state, regional, and federal initiatives; analyses of specific industries and technologies from the perspective of crafting supportive public policy at all three levels; and outreach to multiple stakeholders. Building the Ohio Innovation Economy: Summary of a Symposium explains the of the study, which is to improve the operation of state and regional programs and, collectively, enhance their impact."-- Publisher's description
Cataloging source
DNLM
Funding information
This study was supported by: Contract/Grant No. DE-DT0000236, TO #28 (base award DE-AM01-04PI45013), between the National Academy of Sciences and the Department of Energy; and Contract/Grant No. N01-OD-4-2139, TO #250 between the National Academy of Sciences and the National Institutes of Health. This report was prepared by the National Academy of Sciences under award number SB134106Z0011, TO# 4 (68059), from the U.S. Department of Commerce, National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST). This report was prepared by the National Academy of Sciences under award number 99-06-07543-02 from the Economic Development Administration, U.S. Department of Commerce. Additional support was provided by The University of Akron, NorTech, Case Western Reserve University, Morgenthaler, Jones Day, Cleveland Foundation, The George Gund Foundation, Austen BioInnovation Institute in Akron, The Burton D. Morgan Foundation, Cleveland State University, Kent State University, KeyCorp, Lorain County Community College, Medical Mutual of Ohio, the Heinz Endowments, the Association of University Research Parks, Acciona Energy, Dow Corning, IBM, and SkyFuel, Inc.
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/meetingDate
2011
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/meetingName
Building The Ohio Innovation Economy (Symposium)
NLM call number
T 173.8
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Wessner, Charles W
  • National Research Council (U.S.)
  • National Research Council (U.S.)
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Economic Development
  • Inventions
  • Biomedical Research
  • Models, Organizational
  • Organizational Innovation
  • Ohio
Label
Building the Ohio innovation Economy : summary of a symposium, Charles W. Wessner, rapporteur ; Committee on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives, Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, Policy and Global Affairs, National Research Council of the National Academies, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Title from PDF title page
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Contents
  • PROCEEDINGS -- DAY 1 Welcome and Introduction ; Keynote Address -- Panel I: The Ohio Innovation Economy in the Global Context -- Panel II: Stimulating Manufacturing in Ohio -- Panel III: Innovation Clusters and Economic Development -- Keynote Address: Investing in Ohio -- Panel IV: State and Regional Innovation Programs -- Panel V: The New Energy Economy in Ohio -- DAY 2: Welcome and Introduction -- Panel VI: 21st Century Universities: Drivers of Regional Growth & Employment -- Panel VII: Biomedical Growth Opportunities -- Panel VIII: Growing the Ohio Flexible Electronics Industry -- Panel IX: Early-Stage Finance and Entrepreneurship in Ohio -- Appendix A: Agenda -- Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers -- Appendix C: Participants List -- Appendix D: Bibliography
  • PROCEEDINGS -- DAY 1 Welcome and Introduction ; Keynote Address -- Panel I: The Ohio Innovation Economy in the Global Context -- Panel II: Stimulating Manufacturing in Ohio -- Panel III: Innovation Clusters and Economic Development -- Keynote Address: Investing in Ohio -- Panel IV: State and Regional Innovation Programs -- Panel V: The New Energy Economy in Ohio -- DAY 2: Welcome and Introduction -- Panel VI: 21st Century Universities: Drivers of Regional Growth & Employment -- Panel VII: Biomedical Growth Opportunities -- Panel VIII: Growing the Ohio Flexible Electronics Industry -- Panel IX: Early-Stage Finance and Entrepreneurship in Ohio -- Appendix A: Agenda -- Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers -- Appendix C: Participants List -- Appendix D: Bibliography
  • PROCEEDINGS -- DAY 1 Welcome and Introduction ; Keynote Address -- Panel I: The Ohio Innovation Economy in the Global Context -- Panel II: Stimulating Manufacturing in Ohio -- Panel III: Innovation Clusters and Economic Development -- Keynote Address: Investing in Ohio -- Panel IV: State and Regional Innovation Programs -- Panel V: The New Energy Economy in Ohio -- DAY 2: Welcome and Introduction -- Panel VI: 21st Century Universities: Drivers of Regional Growth & Employment -- Panel VII: Biomedical Growth Opportunities -- Panel VIII: Growing the Ohio Flexible Electronics Industry -- Panel IX: Early-Stage Finance and Entrepreneurship in Ohio -- Appendix A: Agenda -- Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers -- Appendix C: Participants List -- Appendix D: Bibliography
Control code
OCM1bookssj0000920049
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9780309266765
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0000920049
Label
Building the Ohio innovation Economy : summary of a symposium, Charles W. Wessner, rapporteur ; Committee on Competing in the 21st Century: Best Practice in State and Regional Innovation Initiatives, Board on Science, Technology, and Economic Policy, Policy and Global Affairs, National Research Council of the National Academies, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
Title from PDF title page
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Contents
  • PROCEEDINGS -- DAY 1 Welcome and Introduction ; Keynote Address -- Panel I: The Ohio Innovation Economy in the Global Context -- Panel II: Stimulating Manufacturing in Ohio -- Panel III: Innovation Clusters and Economic Development -- Keynote Address: Investing in Ohio -- Panel IV: State and Regional Innovation Programs -- Panel V: The New Energy Economy in Ohio -- DAY 2: Welcome and Introduction -- Panel VI: 21st Century Universities: Drivers of Regional Growth & Employment -- Panel VII: Biomedical Growth Opportunities -- Panel VIII: Growing the Ohio Flexible Electronics Industry -- Panel IX: Early-Stage Finance and Entrepreneurship in Ohio -- Appendix A: Agenda -- Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers -- Appendix C: Participants List -- Appendix D: Bibliography
  • PROCEEDINGS -- DAY 1 Welcome and Introduction ; Keynote Address -- Panel I: The Ohio Innovation Economy in the Global Context -- Panel II: Stimulating Manufacturing in Ohio -- Panel III: Innovation Clusters and Economic Development -- Keynote Address: Investing in Ohio -- Panel IV: State and Regional Innovation Programs -- Panel V: The New Energy Economy in Ohio -- DAY 2: Welcome and Introduction -- Panel VI: 21st Century Universities: Drivers of Regional Growth & Employment -- Panel VII: Biomedical Growth Opportunities -- Panel VIII: Growing the Ohio Flexible Electronics Industry -- Panel IX: Early-Stage Finance and Entrepreneurship in Ohio -- Appendix A: Agenda -- Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers -- Appendix C: Participants List -- Appendix D: Bibliography
  • PROCEEDINGS -- DAY 1 Welcome and Introduction ; Keynote Address -- Panel I: The Ohio Innovation Economy in the Global Context -- Panel II: Stimulating Manufacturing in Ohio -- Panel III: Innovation Clusters and Economic Development -- Keynote Address: Investing in Ohio -- Panel IV: State and Regional Innovation Programs -- Panel V: The New Energy Economy in Ohio -- DAY 2: Welcome and Introduction -- Panel VI: 21st Century Universities: Drivers of Regional Growth & Employment -- Panel VII: Biomedical Growth Opportunities -- Panel VIII: Growing the Ohio Flexible Electronics Industry -- Panel IX: Early-Stage Finance and Entrepreneurship in Ohio -- Appendix A: Agenda -- Appendix B: Biographies of Speakers -- Appendix C: Participants List -- Appendix D: Bibliography
Control code
OCM1bookssj0000920049
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9780309266765
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0000920049

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