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The Resource College in prison : reading in an age of mass incarceration, Daniel Karpowitz, (electronic resource)

College in prison : reading in an age of mass incarceration, Daniel Karpowitz, (electronic resource)

Label
College in prison : reading in an age of mass incarceration
Title
College in prison
Title remainder
reading in an age of mass incarceration
Statement of responsibility
Daniel Karpowitz
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • "The nationally renowned Bard Prison Initiative demonstrates how the liberal arts can alter the landscape inside prisons by expanding access to the transformative power of American higher education. American colleges and universities have made various efforts to provide prisoners with access to education. However, few of these outreach programs presume that incarcerated men and women can rise to the challenge of a truly rigorous college curriculum. The Bard Prison Initiative, however, is different. As this compelling new book reveals, BPI has fostered a remarkable transformation in the lives of thousands of prisoners.College in Prison chronicles how, since 2001, Bard College has provided a high-quality liberal arts education--with courses ranging from anthropology to Mandarin to advanced mathematics--to New York State prisoners who, upon release, have gone on to rewarding careers and elite graduate and professional programs. Yet this is more than just a story of exceptional individuals triumphing against the odds. It is a study in how institutions can be reimagined and reformed in order to give people from all walks of life a chance to enrich their minds and expand their opportunities.Drawing upon fifteen years of experience as a director of and teacher within the Bard Prison Initiative, Daniel Karpowitz tells the story of BPI's development from a small pilot project to a nationwide network. At the same time, he recounts the educational histories of individual students, tracking both their intellectual progress and the many obstacles they must face. Analyzing the transformative encounter between two characteristically American institutions--the undergraduate college and the modern penitentiary--he makes a powerful case for why liberal arts education is still vital to the future of democracy in the United States"--
  • "This book tells the story of the Bard Prison Initiative--a unique example of academic excellence unfolding inside high-security prisons across New York. Through the Initiative, hundreds of incarcerated men and women go to Bard College full-time while still in prison, and thrive at the highest academic levels the college has to offer. This remarkable student body is demographically identical to the larger population of people in New York's prisons, and thus quite unlike those students who usually have access to, and succeed in, America's leading liberal arts colleges. Those who have graduated and left prison are thriving in for-private companies, leading service agencies, and completing further study at elite graduate schools for academia and the professions. The rigor and depth of what and how these students learn, and the careers they pursue once home, force us to rethink preconceptions about who is in prison, what American systems of punishment really mean, and the continued relevance of liberal learning"--
  • "The nationally renowned Bard Prison Initiative demonstrates how the liberal arts can alter the landscape inside prisons by expanding access to the transformative power of American higher education. American colleges and universities have made various efforts to provide prisoners with access to education. However, few of these outreach programs presume that incarcerated men and women can rise to the challenge of a truly rigorous college curriculum. The Bard Prison Initiative, however, is different. As this compelling new book reveals, BPI has fostered a remarkable transformation in the lives of thousands of prisoners.College in Prison chronicles how, since 2001, Bard College has provided a high-quality liberal arts education--with courses ranging from anthropology to Mandarin to advanced mathematics--to New York State prisoners who, upon release, have gone on to rewarding careers and elite graduate and professional programs. Yet this is more than just a story of exceptional individuals triumphing against the odds. It is a study in how institutions can be reimagined and reformed in order to give people from all walks of life a chance to enrich their minds and expand their opportunities.Drawing upon fifteen years of experience as a director of and teacher within the Bard Prison Initiative, Daniel Karpowitz tells the story of BPI's development from a small pilot project to a nationwide network. At the same time, he recounts the educational histories of individual students, tracking both their intellectual progress and the many obstacles they must face. Analyzing the transformative encounter between two characteristically American institutions--the undergraduate college and the modern penitentiary--he makes a powerful case for why liberal arts education is still vital to the future of democracy in the United States"--
  • "This book tells the story of the Bard Prison Initiative--a unique example of academic excellence unfolding inside high-security prisons across New York. Through the Initiative, hundreds of incarcerated men and women go to Bard College full-time while still in prison, and thrive at the highest academic levels the college has to offer. This remarkable student body is demographically identical to the larger population of people in New York's prisons, and thus quite unlike those students who usually have access to, and succeed in, America's leading liberal arts colleges. Those who have graduated and left prison are thriving in for-private companies, leading service agencies, and completing further study at elite graduate schools for academia and the professions. The rigor and depth of what and how these students learn, and the careers they pursue once home, force us to rethink preconceptions about who is in prison, what American systems of punishment really mean, and the continued relevance of liberal learning"--
  • "The nationally renowned Bard Prison Initiative demonstrates how the liberal arts can alter the landscape inside prisons by expanding access to the transformative power of American higher education. American colleges and universities have made various efforts to provide prisoners with access to education. However, few of these outreach programs presume that incarcerated men and women can rise to the challenge of a truly rigorous college curriculum. The Bard Prison Initiative, however, is different. As this compelling new book reveals, BPI has fostered a remarkable transformation in the lives of thousands of prisoners.College in Prison chronicles how, since 2001, Bard College has provided a high-quality liberal arts education--with courses ranging from anthropology to Mandarin to advanced mathematics--to New York State prisoners who, upon release, have gone on to rewarding careers and elite graduate and professional programs. Yet this is more than just a story of exceptional individuals triumphing against the odds. It is a study in how institutions can be reimagined and reformed in order to give people from all walks of life a chance to enrich their minds and expand their opportunities.Drawing upon fifteen years of experience as a director of and teacher within the Bard Prison Initiative, Daniel Karpowitz tells the story of BPI's development from a small pilot project to a nationwide network. At the same time, he recounts the educational histories of individual students, tracking both their intellectual progress and the many obstacles they must face. Analyzing the transformative encounter between two characteristically American institutions--the undergraduate college and the modern penitentiary--he makes a powerful case for why liberal arts education is still vital to the future of democracy in the United States"--
  • "This book tells the story of the Bard Prison Initiative--a unique example of academic excellence unfolding inside high-security prisons across New York. Through the Initiative, hundreds of incarcerated men and women go to Bard College full-time while still in prison, and thrive at the highest academic levels the college has to offer. This remarkable student body is demographically identical to the larger population of people in New York's prisons, and thus quite unlike those students who usually have access to, and succeed in, America's leading liberal arts colleges. Those who have graduated and left prison are thriving in for-private companies, leading service agencies, and completing further study at elite graduate schools for academia and the professions. The rigor and depth of what and how these students learn, and the careers they pursue once home, force us to rethink preconceptions about who is in prison, what American systems of punishment really mean, and the continued relevance of liberal learning"--
  • "The nationally renowned Bard Prison Initiative demonstrates how the liberal arts can alter the landscape inside prisons by expanding access to the transformative power of American higher education. American colleges and universities have made various efforts to provide prisoners with access to education. However, few of these outreach programs presume that incarcerated men and women can rise to the challenge of a truly rigorous college curriculum. The Bard Prison Initiative, however, is different. As this compelling new book reveals, BPI has fostered a remarkable transformation in the lives of thousands of prisoners.College in Prison chronicles how, since 2001, Bard College has provided a high-quality liberal arts education--with courses ranging from anthropology to Mandarin to advanced mathematics--to New York State prisoners who, upon release, have gone on to rewarding careers and elite graduate and professional programs. Yet this is more than just a story of exceptional individuals triumphing against the odds. It is a study in how institutions can be reimagined and reformed in order to give people from all walks of life a chance to enrich their minds and expand their opportunities.Drawing upon fifteen years of experience as a director of and teacher within the Bard Prison Initiative, Daniel Karpowitz tells the story of BPI's development from a small pilot project to a nationwide network. At the same time, he recounts the educational histories of individual students, tracking both their intellectual progress and the many obstacles they must face. Analyzing the transformative encounter between two characteristically American institutions--the undergraduate college and the modern penitentiary--he makes a powerful case for why liberal arts education is still vital to the future of democracy in the United States"--
  • "This book tells the story of the Bard Prison Initiative--a unique example of academic excellence unfolding inside high-security prisons across New York. Through the Initiative, hundreds of incarcerated men and women go to Bard College full-time while still in prison, and thrive at the highest academic levels the college has to offer. This remarkable student body is demographically identical to the larger population of people in New York's prisons, and thus quite unlike those students who usually have access to, and succeed in, America's leading liberal arts colleges. Those who have graduated and left prison are thriving in for-private companies, leading service agencies, and completing further study at elite graduate schools for academia and the professions. The rigor and depth of what and how these students learn, and the careers they pursue once home, force us to rethink preconceptions about who is in prison, what American systems of punishment really mean, and the continued relevance of liberal learning"--
  • "The nationally renowned Bard Prison Initiative demonstrates how the liberal arts can alter the landscape inside prisons by expanding access to the transformative power of American higher education. American colleges and universities have made various efforts to provide prisoners with access to education. However, few of these outreach programs presume that incarcerated men and women can rise to the challenge of a truly rigorous college curriculum. The Bard Prison Initiative, however, is different. As this compelling new book reveals, BPI has fostered a remarkable transformation in the lives of thousands of prisoners.College in Prison chronicles how, since 2001, Bard College has provided a high-quality liberal arts education--with courses ranging from anthropology to Mandarin to advanced mathematics--to New York State prisoners who, upon release, have gone on to rewarding careers and elite graduate and professional programs. Yet this is more than just a story of exceptional individuals triumphing against the odds. It is a study in how institutions can be reimagined and reformed in order to give people from all walks of life a chance to enrich their minds and expand their opportunities.Drawing upon fifteen years of experience as a director of and teacher within the Bard Prison Initiative, Daniel Karpowitz tells the story of BPI's development from a small pilot project to a nationwide network. At the same time, he recounts the educational histories of individual students, tracking both their intellectual progress and the many obstacles they must face. Analyzing the transformative encounter between two characteristically American institutions--the undergraduate college and the modern penitentiary--he makes a powerful case for why liberal arts education is still vital to the future of democracy in the United States"--
  • "This book tells the story of the Bard Prison Initiative--a unique example of academic excellence unfolding inside high-security prisons across New York. Through the Initiative, hundreds of incarcerated men and women go to Bard College full-time while still in prison, and thrive at the highest academic levels the college has to offer. This remarkable student body is demographically identical to the larger population of people in New York's prisons, and thus quite unlike those students who usually have access to, and succeed in, America's leading liberal arts colleges. Those who have graduated and left prison are thriving in for-private companies, leading service agencies, and completing further study at elite graduate schools for academia and the professions. The rigor and depth of what and how these students learn, and the careers they pursue once home, force us to rethink preconceptions about who is in prison, what American systems of punishment really mean, and the continued relevance of liberal learning"--
Assigning source
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Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Karpowitz, Daniel
Dewey number
365/.66609747
LC call number
HV8888.3.U62
LC item number
N75 2017
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Bard College
  • Prisoners
  • Education, Higher
  • Prison administration
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE / Penology
  • EDUCATION / Higher
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE / Criminology
  • EDUCATION / Philosophy & Social Aspects
Label
College in prison : reading in an age of mass incarceration, Daniel Karpowitz, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Machine generated contents note: Preface -- Note on Text -- 1Getting In: The Politics of College in Prison -- 2Landscapes: BPI and Mass Incarceration -- 3Going to Class: Reading Crime and Punishment -- 4The First Graduation: Figures of Speech -- 5Replication and Conclusions: Why and How College in Prison -- Index
  • Machine generated contents note: Preface -- Note on Text -- 1Getting In: The Politics of College in Prison -- 2Landscapes: BPI and Mass Incarceration -- 3Going to Class: Reading Crime and Punishment -- 4The First Graduation: Figures of Speech -- 5Replication and Conclusions: Why and How College in Prison -- Index
  • Machine generated contents note: Preface -- Note on Text -- 1Getting In: The Politics of College in Prison -- 2Landscapes: BPI and Mass Incarceration -- 3Going to Class: Reading Crime and Punishment -- 4The First Graduation: Figures of Speech -- 5Replication and Conclusions: Why and How College in Prison -- Index
  • Machine generated contents note: Preface -- Note on Text -- 1Getting In: The Politics of College in Prison -- 2Landscapes: BPI and Mass Incarceration -- 3Going to Class: Reading Crime and Punishment -- 4The First Graduation: Figures of Speech -- 5Replication and Conclusions: Why and How College in Prison -- Index
  • Machine generated contents note: Preface -- Note on Text -- 1Getting In: The Politics of College in Prison -- 2Landscapes: BPI and Mass Incarceration -- 3Going to Class: Reading Crime and Punishment -- 4The First Graduation: Figures of Speech -- 5Replication and Conclusions: Why and How College in Prison -- Index
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001759640
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9780813584126
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2016012331
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001759640
Label
College in prison : reading in an age of mass incarceration, Daniel Karpowitz, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Machine generated contents note: Preface -- Note on Text -- 1Getting In: The Politics of College in Prison -- 2Landscapes: BPI and Mass Incarceration -- 3Going to Class: Reading Crime and Punishment -- 4The First Graduation: Figures of Speech -- 5Replication and Conclusions: Why and How College in Prison -- Index
  • Machine generated contents note: Preface -- Note on Text -- 1Getting In: The Politics of College in Prison -- 2Landscapes: BPI and Mass Incarceration -- 3Going to Class: Reading Crime and Punishment -- 4The First Graduation: Figures of Speech -- 5Replication and Conclusions: Why and How College in Prison -- Index
  • Machine generated contents note: Preface -- Note on Text -- 1Getting In: The Politics of College in Prison -- 2Landscapes: BPI and Mass Incarceration -- 3Going to Class: Reading Crime and Punishment -- 4The First Graduation: Figures of Speech -- 5Replication and Conclusions: Why and How College in Prison -- Index
  • Machine generated contents note: Preface -- Note on Text -- 1Getting In: The Politics of College in Prison -- 2Landscapes: BPI and Mass Incarceration -- 3Going to Class: Reading Crime and Punishment -- 4The First Graduation: Figures of Speech -- 5Replication and Conclusions: Why and How College in Prison -- Index
  • Machine generated contents note: Preface -- Note on Text -- 1Getting In: The Politics of College in Prison -- 2Landscapes: BPI and Mass Incarceration -- 3Going to Class: Reading Crime and Punishment -- 4The First Graduation: Figures of Speech -- 5Replication and Conclusions: Why and How College in Prison -- Index
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001759640
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9780813584126
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2016012331
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001759640

Library Locations

    • Thomas Jefferson LibraryBorrow it
      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
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