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The Resource Cosmopolitanism in the fictive imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois : toward the humanization of a revolutionary art, Samuel O. Doku, (electronic resource)

Cosmopolitanism in the fictive imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois : toward the humanization of a revolutionary art, Samuel O. Doku, (electronic resource)

Label
Cosmopolitanism in the fictive imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois : toward the humanization of a revolutionary art
Title
Cosmopolitanism in the fictive imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois
Title remainder
toward the humanization of a revolutionary art
Statement of responsibility
Samuel O. Doku
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • "This book traces W.E.B. Du Bois's fictionalization of history in his five major works of fiction and in his debut short story The Souls of Black Folk through a thematic framework of cosmopolitanism. In texts like The Negro and Black Folk: Then and Now, Du Bois argues that the human race originated from a single source, a claim authenticated by anthropologists and the Human Genome Project. This book breaks new ground by demonstrating the fashion in which the variants of cosmopolitanism become a profound theme in Du Bois's contribution to fiction. In general, cosmopolitanism claims that people belong to a single community informed by common moral values, function through a shared economic nomenclature, and are part of political systems grounded in mutual respect. This book addresses Du Bois's works as important additions to the academy and makes a significant contribution to literature by first demonstrating the way in which fiction could be utilized in discussing historical accounts in order to reach a global audience. "The Coming of John", The Quest of the Silver Fleece, Dark Princess: A Romance, and The Black Flame, an important trilogy published sequentially as The Ordeal of Mansart, Mansart Builds a School, and Worlds of Color are grounded in historical occurrences and administer as social histories providing commentary on Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, African American leadership, school desegregation, the Pan-African movement, imperialism, and colonialism in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean." --
  • "This book traces W.E.B. Du Bois's fictionalization of history in his five major works of fiction and in his debut short story The Souls of Black Folk through a thematic framework of cosmopolitanism. In texts like The Negro and Black Folk: Then and Now, Du Bois argues that the human race originated from a single source, a claim authenticated by anthropologists and the Human Genome Project. This book breaks new ground by demonstrating the fashion in which the variants of cosmopolitanism become a profound theme in Du Bois's contribution to fiction. In general, cosmopolitanism claims that people belong to a single community informed by common moral values, function through a shared economic nomenclature, and are part of political systems grounded in mutual respect. This book addresses Du Bois's works as important additions to the academy and makes a significant contribution to literature by first demonstrating the way in which fiction could be utilized in discussing historical accounts in order to reach a global audience."The Coming of John", The Quest of the Silver Fleece, Dark Princess: A Romance, and The Black Flame, an important trilogy published sequentially as The Ordeal of Mansart, Mansart Builds a School, and Worlds of Color are grounded in historical occurrences and administer as social histories providing commentary on Reconstruction, Jim Crow segregation, African American leadership, school desegregation, the Pan-African movement, imperialism, and colonialism in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean." --
Member of
Assigning source
  • Publisher's description
  • Publisher's description
Cataloging source
BTCTA
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Doku, Samuel O
Dewey number
813.5/2
LC call number
PS3507.U147
LC item number
Z57 2015
Series statement
Critical Africana studies: African, African American, and Caribbean interdisciplinary and intersectional studies
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Du Bois, W. E. B.
  • Du Bois, W. E. B.
  • American literature
  • Blacks
  • Cosmopolitanism in literature
  • Du Bois, W. E. B.
  • Du Bois, William E. B
  • American literature
  • Blacks
  • Cosmopolitanism in literature
  • Criticism and interpretation
  • Weltbürgertum
  • Ethnische Identität
  • Schwarze
Label
Cosmopolitanism in the fictive imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois : toward the humanization of a revolutionary art, Samuel O. Doku, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 177-182) and index
Contents
  • Africology and Hebraism: tropes of classical humanism in The quest of the silver fleece and the souls of black folk -- Good character challenges hegemony in The quest of the silver fleece -- Heuristic appraisal of avant-garde cosmopolitanism in The quest of the silver fleece -- Discrepant cosmopolitanism in the imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois in Dark princess: a romance -- Universal symbolism of culture in Dark princess: a romance -- Beyond the color line: black cosmopolitanism as thematic design in The black flame -- Genesis of traditional Pan-Africanism and its aftermath -- A botched master plan for continental Pan-Africanism and friends of Du Bois in Africa and the Caribbean -- W.E.B. Du Bois, the inspiration of Gandhi, and the Pan-Asian connection -- Barack Obama epitomizes Du Bois's vision in Dark princess: Nkrumah and Du Bois emerge as unheralded cosmopolitans -- Epilogue: The great redeemer
  • Africology and Hebraism: tropes of classical humanism in The quest of the silver fleece and the souls of black folk -- Good character challenges hegemony in The quest of the silver fleece -- Heuristic appraisal of avant-garde cosmopolitanism in The quest of the silver fleece -- Discrepant cosmopolitanism in the imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois in Dark princess: a romance -- Universal symbolism of culture in Dark princess: a romance -- Beyond the color line: black cosmopolitanism as thematic design in The black flame -- Genesis of traditional Pan-Africanism and its aftermath -- A botched master plan for continental Pan-Africanism and friends of Du Bois in Africa and the Caribbean -- W.E.B. Du Bois, the inspiration of Gandhi, and the Pan-Asian connection -- Barack Obama epitomizes Du Bois's vision in Dark princess: Nkrumah and Du Bois emerge as unheralded cosmopolitans -- Epilogue: The great redeemer
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001756972
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9781498518314
Lccn
2015952386
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001756972
Label
Cosmopolitanism in the fictive imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois : toward the humanization of a revolutionary art, Samuel O. Doku, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 177-182) and index
Contents
  • Africology and Hebraism: tropes of classical humanism in The quest of the silver fleece and the souls of black folk -- Good character challenges hegemony in The quest of the silver fleece -- Heuristic appraisal of avant-garde cosmopolitanism in The quest of the silver fleece -- Discrepant cosmopolitanism in the imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois in Dark princess: a romance -- Universal symbolism of culture in Dark princess: a romance -- Beyond the color line: black cosmopolitanism as thematic design in The black flame -- Genesis of traditional Pan-Africanism and its aftermath -- A botched master plan for continental Pan-Africanism and friends of Du Bois in Africa and the Caribbean -- W.E.B. Du Bois, the inspiration of Gandhi, and the Pan-Asian connection -- Barack Obama epitomizes Du Bois's vision in Dark princess: Nkrumah and Du Bois emerge as unheralded cosmopolitans -- Epilogue: The great redeemer
  • Africology and Hebraism: tropes of classical humanism in The quest of the silver fleece and the souls of black folk -- Good character challenges hegemony in The quest of the silver fleece -- Heuristic appraisal of avant-garde cosmopolitanism in The quest of the silver fleece -- Discrepant cosmopolitanism in the imagination of W.E.B. Du Bois in Dark princess: a romance -- Universal symbolism of culture in Dark princess: a romance -- Beyond the color line: black cosmopolitanism as thematic design in The black flame -- Genesis of traditional Pan-Africanism and its aftermath -- A botched master plan for continental Pan-Africanism and friends of Du Bois in Africa and the Caribbean -- W.E.B. Du Bois, the inspiration of Gandhi, and the Pan-Asian connection -- Barack Obama epitomizes Du Bois's vision in Dark princess: Nkrumah and Du Bois emerge as unheralded cosmopolitans -- Epilogue: The great redeemer
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001756972
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9781498518314
Lccn
2015952386
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001756972

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