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The Resource Divided : the perils of our growing inequality, edited by David Cay Johnston, (electronic resource)

Divided : the perils of our growing inequality, edited by David Cay Johnston, (electronic resource)

Label
Divided : the perils of our growing inequality
Title
Divided
Title remainder
the perils of our growing inequality
Statement of responsibility
edited by David Cay Johnston
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • "The issue of inequality has irrefutably returned to the fore, riding on the anger against Wall Street following the 2008 financial crisis and the concentration of economic and political power in the hands of the super-rich. The Occupy movement made the plight of the 99 percent an indelible part of the public consciousness, and concerns about inequality were a decisive factor in the 2012 presidential elections. How bad is it? According to Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Cay Johnston, most Americans, in inflation-adjusted terms, are now back to the average income of 1966. Shockingly, from 2009 to 2011, the top 1 percent got 121 percent of the income gains while the bottom 99 percent saw their income fall. Yet in this most unequal of developed nations, every aspect of inequality remains hotly contested and poorly understood. Divided collects the writings of leading scholars, activists, and journalists to provide an illuminating, multifaceted look at inequality in America, exploring its devastating implications in areas as diverse as education, justice, health care, social mobility, and political representation. Provocative and eminently readable, here is an essential resource for anyone who cares about the future of America--and compelling evidence that inequality can be ignored only at the nation's peril. "--
  • "The issue of inequality has irrefutably returned to the fore, riding on the anger against Wall Street following the 2008 financial crisis and the concentration of economic and political power in the hands of the super-rich. The Occupy movement made the plight of the 99 percent an indelible part of the public consciousness, and concerns about inequality were a decisive factor in the 2012 presidential elections. How bad is it? According to Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Cay Johnston, most Americans, in inflation-adjusted terms, are now back to the average income of 1966. Shockingly, from 2009 to 2011, the top 1 percent got 121 percent of the income gains while the bottom 99 percent saw their income fall. Yet in this most unequal of developed nations, every aspect of inequality remains hotly contested and poorly understood. Divided collects the writings of leading scholars, activists, and journalists to provide an illuminating, multifaceted look at inequality in America, exploring its devastating implications in areas as diverse as education, justice, health care, social mobility, and political representation. Provocative and eminently readable, here is an essential resource for anyone who cares about the future of America--and compelling evidence that inequality can be ignored only at the nation's peril. "--
  • "The issue of inequality has irrefutably returned to the fore, riding on the anger against Wall Street following the 2008 financial crisis and the concentration of economic and political power in the hands of the super-rich. The Occupy movement made the plight of the 99 percent an indelible part of the public consciousness, and concerns about inequality were a decisive factor in the 2012 presidential elections. How bad is it? According to Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist David Cay Johnston, most Americans, in inflation-adjusted terms, are now back to the average income of 1966. Shockingly, from 2009 to 2011, the top 1 percent got 121 percent of the income gains while the bottom 99 percent saw their income fall. Yet in this most unequal of developed nations, every aspect of inequality remains hotly contested and poorly understood. Divided collects the writings of leading scholars, activists, and journalists to provide an illuminating, multifaceted look at inequality in America, exploring its devastating implications in areas as diverse as education, justice, health care, social mobility, and political representation. Provocative and eminently readable, here is an essential resource for anyone who cares about the future of America--and compelling evidence that inequality can be ignored only at the nation's peril."--
Assigning source
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
305
LC call number
HM821
LC item number
.D585 2014
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1948-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Johnston, David
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Equality
  • Income distribution
  • United States
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE / Public Policy / Economic Policy
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE / Public Policy / Social Policy
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE / Public Policy / Social Services & Welfare
  • SOCIAL SCIENCE / Poverty & Homelessness
Label
Divided : the perils of our growing inequality, edited by David Cay Johnston, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001224237
Dimensions
22 cm
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xxi, 324 pages
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9781595589231
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2013041718
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0001224237
Label
Divided : the perils of our growing inequality, edited by David Cay Johnston, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001224237
Dimensions
22 cm
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xxi, 324 pages
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9781595589231
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2013041718
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0001224237

Library Locations

    • Thomas Jefferson LibraryBorrow it
      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
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