Coverart for item
The Resource Emerging markets in an upside down world : challenging perceptions in asset allocation and investment, Jerome Booth

Emerging markets in an upside down world : challenging perceptions in asset allocation and investment, Jerome Booth

Label
Emerging markets in an upside down world : challenging perceptions in asset allocation and investment
Title
Emerging markets in an upside down world
Title remainder
challenging perceptions in asset allocation and investment
Statement of responsibility
Jerome Booth
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Member of
Cataloging source
YDXCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Booth, Jerome
Dewey number
332.673091724
Index
index present
LC call number
HG5993
LC item number
.B66 2014
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Wiley finance series
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Investments, Foreign
  • Investments, Foreign
  • Developing countries
Label
Emerging markets in an upside down world : challenging perceptions in asset allocation and investment, Jerome Booth
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
Machine generated contents note: 1.1.Upside down: perception vs reality -- 1.2.The structure of the book -- 1.Globalisation and the Current Global Economy -- 1.1.What is globalisation? -- 1.2.Economic history and globalisation -- 1.2.1.The desire to control and its impact on trade -- 1.2.2.The influence of money -- 1.2.3.Trade and commodification -- 1.2.4.Nationalism -- 1.3.Recent globalisation -- 1.3.1.Bretton Woods -- 1.3.2.Ideological shifts -- 1.3.3.Participating in globalisation: living with volatility -- 2.Defining Emerging Markets -- 2.1.The great global rebalancing -- 2.1.1.Financing sovereigns -- 2.1.2.Catching up -- 2.1.3.The poorest can also emerge: aid and debt -- 2.1.4.From debt to transparency and legitimacy -- 2.2.Investing in emerging markets -- 2.3.Emerging market debt in the 20th century -- 2.3.1.Types of external sovereign debt -- 2.3.2.From Mexican crisis to Brady bonds -- 2.3.3.Market discipline -- 2.3.4.Eastern Europe -- 2.3.5.Mexico in crisis again -- 2.3.6.The Asian and Russian crises -- 2.3.7.Emerging markets grow up -- (a).The first change: country and contagion risks fall -- (b).The second change: the investor base -- 2.3.8.Testing robustness: Argentina defaults -- 2.3.9.The end of the self-fulfilling prophecy -- 2.4.The growth of local currency debt -- 2.5.Why invest in emerging markets? -- 3.The 2008 Credit Crunch and Aftermath -- 3.1.Bank regulation failure -- 3.1.1.Sub-prime -- 3.2.The 2008 crisis -- 3.3.Depression risk -- 3.3.1.Reducing the debt -- 3.3.2.Deleveraging is not an emerging market problem -- 3.4.Global central bank imbalances -- 4.Limitations of Economics and Finance Theory -- 4.1.Theoretical thought and limitations -- 4.2.Economics, a vehicle for the ruling ideology -- 4.3.Macroeconomics -- 4.4.Microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics -- 4.4.1.Efficient market hypothesis -- 4.4.2.Modern portfolio theory -- 4.4.3.Investment under uncertainty -- 4.5.Bounded decisions and behavioural finance -- 5.What is Risk? -- 5.1.Specific and systematic risk -- 5.2.Looking backwards -- 5.3.Uncertainty -- 5.4.Risk and volatility -- 5.5.Risk in emerging markets -- 5.6.Rating agencies -- 5.7.Capacity, willingness, trust -- 5.7.1.Rich countries default by other means -- 5.7.2.Two sets of risk in emerging markets -- 5.8.Sovereign risk: a three-layer approach -- 5.9.Prejudice, risk and markets -- 5.9.1.When you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail -- 6.Core/Periphery Disease -- 6.1.The core/periphery paradigm -- 6.1.1.Core breach? -- 6.1.2.Another core/periphery concept: decoupling -- 6.1.3.And another: spreads -- 6.2.Beyond core/periphery -- 6.2.1.Towards a relative theory of risk -- 6.2.2.GDP weighting -- 7.The Structure of Investment -- 7.1.Misaligned incentives -- 7.2.Confused incentives -- 7.3.Evolutionary dynamics, institutional forms -- 7.3.1.History matters -- 7.4.Network theory -- 7.5.Game theory -- 7.6.Investor structure and liquidity -- 7.7.Market segmentation -- 7.7.1.Warning signals -- 7.8.Investor base structure matters -- 8.Asset Allocation -- 8.1.Asset classes -- 8.1.1.Alternatives -- 8.2.How asset allocation occurs today -- 8.2.1.Investor types -- 8.2.2.Asset/liability management -- 8.3.From efficiency frontiers to revealed preferences -- 8.4.Asset allocation vs manager selection; active vs passive -- 8.5.Allocating at sea -- 9.Thinking Strategically in the Investment Process -- 9.1.Thinking strategically -- 9.1.1.Thinking strategically: appropriate discounting -- 9.2.Scenario planning -- 9.3.Global structural shifts ahead? -- 9.3.1.Asset allocation: some proposed new rules -- 9.4.Investment process in emerging debt -- 9.5.Conclusion -- 10.A New Way to Invest -- 10.1.Sense-checking assumptions -- 10.1.1.Risk, uncertainty and information asymmetry assumptions -- 10.1.2.Investor psychology and behaviour assumptions -- 10.1.3.Structure, market efficiency, equilibrium and market dynamics -- 10.1.4.Asset class definitions -- 10.2.Assessing liabilities -- 10.3.Your constraints -- 10.3.1.The decision chain -- 10.3.2.Institutional capabilities -- 10.3.3.Psychological constraints -- 10.4.Consider changing your constraints: agency issues -- 10.5.Building scenarios -- 10.6.Understanding market structure -- 10.7.Asset allocation -- 10.7.1.Route 1: Comprehensive -- 10.7.2.Route 2: Entrepreneurial -- 10.7.3.Asset allocation dynamics -- 10.8.Meta-allocation: toolset choice -- 10.9.Follow the skillset -- 10.10.Portfolio construction and monitoring -- 11.Regulation and Policy Lessons -- 11.1.Regulating financial institutions: new and old lessons -- 11.1.1.Fix the banks -- 11.1.2.Non-banks: who holds what? -- 11.1.3.Reduce agency problems: trustee incentives -- 11.1.4.Honour public service -- 11.1.5.Choice architecture -- 11.2.What to do about systemic risk? -- 11.2.1.Avoid regulation that amplifies risk -- 11.2.2.Beware market segmentation -- 11.2.3.Structure matters -- 11.2.4.Map perceptions of risk -- 11.2.5.Detect and stop asset bubbles -- 11.2.6.Preserve credibility -- 11.3.Wish list for emerging market policymakers -- 11.3.1.Allow markets to work -- 11.3.2.Proclaim and foster greater pricing power -- 11.3.3.Promote EM global banks, south-south linkages -- 11.3.4.Build capital markets -- 11.3.5.Fight core/periphery disease -- 11.4.Reserve management and the international monetary system -- 11.4.1.The dollar is your problem -- 11.4.2.Alternatives to the dollar -- 11.4.3.Too many reserves -- 11.5.What investors can expect from HIDC policymakers -- 11.5.1.Financial repression -- 11.5.2.Consequences of financial repression for banks -- 11.5.3.No early exit from quantitative easing? -- 11.5.4.Bond crash -- 11.5.5.Inflation -- 11.5.6.Appeals to foreign investors -- 11.5.7.Regulatory muddle-through -- 11.5.8.Pension reform -- 11.5.9.Pension regulatory conflict may only abate once EM investors exit -- 11.5.10.Rating agencies -- 11.5.11.Intellectual reassessment -- 11.6.What investors can expect from emerging market policymakers -- 12.Conclusion -- 12.1.A final list... -- 12.2....for an upside down world
Control code
862883065
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xii, 265 pages
Isbn
9781118879672
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)862883065
Label
Emerging markets in an upside down world : challenging perceptions in asset allocation and investment, Jerome Booth
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier.
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent.
Contents
Machine generated contents note: 1.1.Upside down: perception vs reality -- 1.2.The structure of the book -- 1.Globalisation and the Current Global Economy -- 1.1.What is globalisation? -- 1.2.Economic history and globalisation -- 1.2.1.The desire to control and its impact on trade -- 1.2.2.The influence of money -- 1.2.3.Trade and commodification -- 1.2.4.Nationalism -- 1.3.Recent globalisation -- 1.3.1.Bretton Woods -- 1.3.2.Ideological shifts -- 1.3.3.Participating in globalisation: living with volatility -- 2.Defining Emerging Markets -- 2.1.The great global rebalancing -- 2.1.1.Financing sovereigns -- 2.1.2.Catching up -- 2.1.3.The poorest can also emerge: aid and debt -- 2.1.4.From debt to transparency and legitimacy -- 2.2.Investing in emerging markets -- 2.3.Emerging market debt in the 20th century -- 2.3.1.Types of external sovereign debt -- 2.3.2.From Mexican crisis to Brady bonds -- 2.3.3.Market discipline -- 2.3.4.Eastern Europe -- 2.3.5.Mexico in crisis again -- 2.3.6.The Asian and Russian crises -- 2.3.7.Emerging markets grow up -- (a).The first change: country and contagion risks fall -- (b).The second change: the investor base -- 2.3.8.Testing robustness: Argentina defaults -- 2.3.9.The end of the self-fulfilling prophecy -- 2.4.The growth of local currency debt -- 2.5.Why invest in emerging markets? -- 3.The 2008 Credit Crunch and Aftermath -- 3.1.Bank regulation failure -- 3.1.1.Sub-prime -- 3.2.The 2008 crisis -- 3.3.Depression risk -- 3.3.1.Reducing the debt -- 3.3.2.Deleveraging is not an emerging market problem -- 3.4.Global central bank imbalances -- 4.Limitations of Economics and Finance Theory -- 4.1.Theoretical thought and limitations -- 4.2.Economics, a vehicle for the ruling ideology -- 4.3.Macroeconomics -- 4.4.Microeconomic foundations of macroeconomics -- 4.4.1.Efficient market hypothesis -- 4.4.2.Modern portfolio theory -- 4.4.3.Investment under uncertainty -- 4.5.Bounded decisions and behavioural finance -- 5.What is Risk? -- 5.1.Specific and systematic risk -- 5.2.Looking backwards -- 5.3.Uncertainty -- 5.4.Risk and volatility -- 5.5.Risk in emerging markets -- 5.6.Rating agencies -- 5.7.Capacity, willingness, trust -- 5.7.1.Rich countries default by other means -- 5.7.2.Two sets of risk in emerging markets -- 5.8.Sovereign risk: a three-layer approach -- 5.9.Prejudice, risk and markets -- 5.9.1.When you have a hammer, everything looks like a nail -- 6.Core/Periphery Disease -- 6.1.The core/periphery paradigm -- 6.1.1.Core breach? -- 6.1.2.Another core/periphery concept: decoupling -- 6.1.3.And another: spreads -- 6.2.Beyond core/periphery -- 6.2.1.Towards a relative theory of risk -- 6.2.2.GDP weighting -- 7.The Structure of Investment -- 7.1.Misaligned incentives -- 7.2.Confused incentives -- 7.3.Evolutionary dynamics, institutional forms -- 7.3.1.History matters -- 7.4.Network theory -- 7.5.Game theory -- 7.6.Investor structure and liquidity -- 7.7.Market segmentation -- 7.7.1.Warning signals -- 7.8.Investor base structure matters -- 8.Asset Allocation -- 8.1.Asset classes -- 8.1.1.Alternatives -- 8.2.How asset allocation occurs today -- 8.2.1.Investor types -- 8.2.2.Asset/liability management -- 8.3.From efficiency frontiers to revealed preferences -- 8.4.Asset allocation vs manager selection; active vs passive -- 8.5.Allocating at sea -- 9.Thinking Strategically in the Investment Process -- 9.1.Thinking strategically -- 9.1.1.Thinking strategically: appropriate discounting -- 9.2.Scenario planning -- 9.3.Global structural shifts ahead? -- 9.3.1.Asset allocation: some proposed new rules -- 9.4.Investment process in emerging debt -- 9.5.Conclusion -- 10.A New Way to Invest -- 10.1.Sense-checking assumptions -- 10.1.1.Risk, uncertainty and information asymmetry assumptions -- 10.1.2.Investor psychology and behaviour assumptions -- 10.1.3.Structure, market efficiency, equilibrium and market dynamics -- 10.1.4.Asset class definitions -- 10.2.Assessing liabilities -- 10.3.Your constraints -- 10.3.1.The decision chain -- 10.3.2.Institutional capabilities -- 10.3.3.Psychological constraints -- 10.4.Consider changing your constraints: agency issues -- 10.5.Building scenarios -- 10.6.Understanding market structure -- 10.7.Asset allocation -- 10.7.1.Route 1: Comprehensive -- 10.7.2.Route 2: Entrepreneurial -- 10.7.3.Asset allocation dynamics -- 10.8.Meta-allocation: toolset choice -- 10.9.Follow the skillset -- 10.10.Portfolio construction and monitoring -- 11.Regulation and Policy Lessons -- 11.1.Regulating financial institutions: new and old lessons -- 11.1.1.Fix the banks -- 11.1.2.Non-banks: who holds what? -- 11.1.3.Reduce agency problems: trustee incentives -- 11.1.4.Honour public service -- 11.1.5.Choice architecture -- 11.2.What to do about systemic risk? -- 11.2.1.Avoid regulation that amplifies risk -- 11.2.2.Beware market segmentation -- 11.2.3.Structure matters -- 11.2.4.Map perceptions of risk -- 11.2.5.Detect and stop asset bubbles -- 11.2.6.Preserve credibility -- 11.3.Wish list for emerging market policymakers -- 11.3.1.Allow markets to work -- 11.3.2.Proclaim and foster greater pricing power -- 11.3.3.Promote EM global banks, south-south linkages -- 11.3.4.Build capital markets -- 11.3.5.Fight core/periphery disease -- 11.4.Reserve management and the international monetary system -- 11.4.1.The dollar is your problem -- 11.4.2.Alternatives to the dollar -- 11.4.3.Too many reserves -- 11.5.What investors can expect from HIDC policymakers -- 11.5.1.Financial repression -- 11.5.2.Consequences of financial repression for banks -- 11.5.3.No early exit from quantitative easing? -- 11.5.4.Bond crash -- 11.5.5.Inflation -- 11.5.6.Appeals to foreign investors -- 11.5.7.Regulatory muddle-through -- 11.5.8.Pension reform -- 11.5.9.Pension regulatory conflict may only abate once EM investors exit -- 11.5.10.Rating agencies -- 11.5.11.Intellectual reassessment -- 11.6.What investors can expect from emerging market policymakers -- 12.Conclusion -- 12.1.A final list... -- 12.2....for an upside down world
Control code
862883065
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
xii, 265 pages
Isbn
9781118879672
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia.
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)862883065

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