Coverart for item
The Resource Energy harvesting for autonomous systems, Stephen Beeby, Neil White, editors

Energy harvesting for autonomous systems, Stephen Beeby, Neil White, editors

Label
Energy harvesting for autonomous systems
Title
Energy harvesting for autonomous systems
Statement of responsibility
Stephen Beeby, Neil White, editors
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
This unique resource provides a detailed understanding of the options for harvesting energy from localized, renewable sources to supply power to autonomous wireless systems. You are introduced to a variety of types of autonomous system and wireless networks and discover the capabilities of existing battery-based solutions, RF solutions, and fuel cells. The book focuses on the most promising harvesting techniques, including solar, kinetic, and thermal energy. You also learn the implications of the energy harvesting techniques on the design of the power management electronics in a system. This i
Member of
Cataloging source
N$T
Dewey number
621.312
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
TK1005
LC item number
.E54 2010eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Beeby, Stephen
  • White, Neil
Series statement
Artech House series smart materials, structures, and systems
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Energy harvesting
  • Energy storage
  • Energy storage
  • TECHNOLOGY & ENGINEERING
  • Energy harvesting
  • Energy storage
  • Energy storage
Label
Energy harvesting for autonomous systems, Stephen Beeby, Neil White, editors
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Energy Harvesting for Autonomous Systems; Contents; Chapter 1 Introduction; 1.1 Background and Motivation; 1.2 Typical System Architecture; 1.3 Intended Readership for This Book; Reference; Chapter 2 Wireless Devices and Sensor Networks; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Energy Requirements of Autonomous Devices; 2.2.1 From Mobile Phones to MP3 Players; 2.2.2 Radio Frequency Identification (RFID); 2.2.3 Wireless Sensor Networks; 2.3 Enabling Technologies: Devices and Peripherals; 2.3.1 Low-Power Microcontrollers and Transceivers; 2.3.2 Sensors, Peripherals, and Interfaces; 2.4 Wireless Communication
  • 2.4.1 Communication Protocols and Power Requirements2.4.2 Energy-Aware Communication Protocols; 2.5 Energy-Awareness in Embedded Software; 2.5.1 Operating Systems and Software Architectures; 2.6 Alternative Nonrenewable Power Sources; 2.6.1 Direct Transmission; 2.7 Discussion; References; Chapter 3 Photovoltaic Energy Harvesting; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Background; 3.2.1 Semiconductor Basics; 3.3 Solar Cell Characteristics; 3.4 Module Characteristics; 3.5 Irradiance Standards; 3.5.1 Outdoor Operation; 3.5.2 Indoor Operation; 3.6 Efficiency Losses; 3.6.1 Intrinsic Losses; 3.6.2 Extrinsic Losses
  • 3.6.3 Module Losses3.7 Device Technologies; 3.7.1 Silicon Wafers; 3.7.2 Single Crystal and Multicrystalline Devices; 3.7.3 Amorphous Silicon; 3.7.4 Thin Film Polycrystalline Silicon; 3.7.5 Multijunction Silicon; 3.7.6 Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulphide; 3.7.7 Copper Indium (Gallium) Disselenide; 3.7.8 Single and Multijunction III-V Cells; 3.7.9 Emergent Technologies; 3.8 Photovoltaic Systems; 3.8.1 Basic System; 3.8.2 Charge Controllers; 3.8.3 DC-DC Converters and Maximum Power Point Tracking; 3.8.4 Miniaturization and Low-Power Systems; 3.8.5 Device Technology; 3.8.6 Systems Considerations
  • 3.9 SummaryReferences; Chapter 4 Kinetic Energy Harvesting; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Kinetic Energy-Harvesting Applications; 4.2.1 Human; 4.2.2 Industrial; 4.2.3 Transport; 4.2.4 Structural; 4.3 Inertial Generators; 4.4 Transduction Mechanisms; 4.4.1 Piezoelectric Generators; 4.4.2 Electromagnetic Transduction; 4.4.3 Electrostatic Generators; 4.4.4 Transduction Damping Coefficients; 4.4.5 Microscale Implementations; 4.5 Operating Frequency Range; 4.5.1 Frequency Tuning; 4.5.2 Strategies to Broaden the Bandwidth; 4.6 Rotary Generators; 4.7 Example Devices; 4.7.1 Human-Powered Harvesters
  • 4.7.2 Conventional Generators for Industrial and Transport Applications4.7.3 Microscale Generators; 4.7.4 Tuneable Generators; 4.8 Conclusions and Future Possibilities; 4.8.1 Piezoelectric Generators; 4.8.1 Piezoelectric Generators; 4.8.2 Electromagnetic Generators; 4.8.3 Electrostatic Generators; 4.8.4 Summary; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter 5 Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Principles of Thermoelectric Devices; 5.2.1 Thermoelectric Effects; 5.2.2 Thermoelectric Devices; 5.3 Infl uence of Materials, Contacts, and Geometry
Control code
670429841
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 292 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781523117130
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)670429841
Label
Energy harvesting for autonomous systems, Stephen Beeby, Neil White, editors
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Energy Harvesting for Autonomous Systems; Contents; Chapter 1 Introduction; 1.1 Background and Motivation; 1.2 Typical System Architecture; 1.3 Intended Readership for This Book; Reference; Chapter 2 Wireless Devices and Sensor Networks; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 Energy Requirements of Autonomous Devices; 2.2.1 From Mobile Phones to MP3 Players; 2.2.2 Radio Frequency Identification (RFID); 2.2.3 Wireless Sensor Networks; 2.3 Enabling Technologies: Devices and Peripherals; 2.3.1 Low-Power Microcontrollers and Transceivers; 2.3.2 Sensors, Peripherals, and Interfaces; 2.4 Wireless Communication
  • 2.4.1 Communication Protocols and Power Requirements2.4.2 Energy-Aware Communication Protocols; 2.5 Energy-Awareness in Embedded Software; 2.5.1 Operating Systems and Software Architectures; 2.6 Alternative Nonrenewable Power Sources; 2.6.1 Direct Transmission; 2.7 Discussion; References; Chapter 3 Photovoltaic Energy Harvesting; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Background; 3.2.1 Semiconductor Basics; 3.3 Solar Cell Characteristics; 3.4 Module Characteristics; 3.5 Irradiance Standards; 3.5.1 Outdoor Operation; 3.5.2 Indoor Operation; 3.6 Efficiency Losses; 3.6.1 Intrinsic Losses; 3.6.2 Extrinsic Losses
  • 3.6.3 Module Losses3.7 Device Technologies; 3.7.1 Silicon Wafers; 3.7.2 Single Crystal and Multicrystalline Devices; 3.7.3 Amorphous Silicon; 3.7.4 Thin Film Polycrystalline Silicon; 3.7.5 Multijunction Silicon; 3.7.6 Cadmium Telluride/Cadmium Sulphide; 3.7.7 Copper Indium (Gallium) Disselenide; 3.7.8 Single and Multijunction III-V Cells; 3.7.9 Emergent Technologies; 3.8 Photovoltaic Systems; 3.8.1 Basic System; 3.8.2 Charge Controllers; 3.8.3 DC-DC Converters and Maximum Power Point Tracking; 3.8.4 Miniaturization and Low-Power Systems; 3.8.5 Device Technology; 3.8.6 Systems Considerations
  • 3.9 SummaryReferences; Chapter 4 Kinetic Energy Harvesting; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 Kinetic Energy-Harvesting Applications; 4.2.1 Human; 4.2.2 Industrial; 4.2.3 Transport; 4.2.4 Structural; 4.3 Inertial Generators; 4.4 Transduction Mechanisms; 4.4.1 Piezoelectric Generators; 4.4.2 Electromagnetic Transduction; 4.4.3 Electrostatic Generators; 4.4.4 Transduction Damping Coefficients; 4.4.5 Microscale Implementations; 4.5 Operating Frequency Range; 4.5.1 Frequency Tuning; 4.5.2 Strategies to Broaden the Bandwidth; 4.6 Rotary Generators; 4.7 Example Devices; 4.7.1 Human-Powered Harvesters
  • 4.7.2 Conventional Generators for Industrial and Transport Applications4.7.3 Microscale Generators; 4.7.4 Tuneable Generators; 4.8 Conclusions and Future Possibilities; 4.8.1 Piezoelectric Generators; 4.8.1 Piezoelectric Generators; 4.8.2 Electromagnetic Generators; 4.8.3 Electrostatic Generators; 4.8.4 Summary; Acknowledgments; References; Chapter 5 Thermoelectric Energy Harvesting; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Principles of Thermoelectric Devices; 5.2.1 Thermoelectric Effects; 5.2.2 Thermoelectric Devices; 5.3 Infl uence of Materials, Contacts, and Geometry
Control code
670429841
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (ix, 292 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781523117130
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)670429841

Library Locations

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      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
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