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The Resource Fate, time, and language : an essay on free will : David Foster Wallace, edited by Steven M. Cahn and Maureen Eckert ; introduction by James Ryerson ; epilogue by Jay Garfield, (electronic resource)

Fate, time, and language : an essay on free will : David Foster Wallace, edited by Steven M. Cahn and Maureen Eckert ; introduction by James Ryerson ; epilogue by Jay Garfield, (electronic resource)

Label
Fate, time, and language : an essay on free will : David Foster Wallace
Title
Fate, time, and language
Title remainder
an essay on free will : David Foster Wallace
Statement of responsibility
edited by Steven M. Cahn and Maureen Eckert ; introduction by James Ryerson ; epilogue by Jay Garfield
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Annotation:
Cataloging source
DLC
Dewey number
123
LC call number
BJ1461.T293
LC item number
F38 2011
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
1966-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Cahn, Steven M
  • Eckert, Maureen
  • Wallace, David Foster
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Taylor, Richard
  • Fate and fatalism
  • Semantics
Summary expansion
In 1962, the philosopher Richard Taylor used six commonly accepted presuppositions to imply that human beings have no control over the future. David Foster Wallace not only took issue with Taylor's method, which, according to him, scrambled the relations of logic, language, and the physical world, but also noted a semantic trick at the heart of Taylor's argument. Fate, Time, and Language presents Wallace's brilliant critique of Taylor's work. Written long before the publication of his fiction and essays, Wallace's thesis reveals his great skepticism of abstract thinking made to function as a negation of something more genuine and real. He was especially suspicious of certain paradigms of thought-the cerebral aestheticism of modernism, the clever gimmickry of postmodernism-that abandoned "the very old traditional human verities that have to do with spirituality and emotion and community." As Wallace rises to meet the challenge to free will presented by Taylor, we witness the developing perspective of this major novelist, along with his struggle to establish solid logical ground for his convictions. This volume, edited by Steven M. Cahn and Maureen Eckert, reproduces Taylor's original article and other works on fatalism cited by Wallace. James Ryerson's introduction connects Wallace's early philosophical work to the themes and explorations of his later fiction, and Jay Garfield supplies a critical biographical epilogue
Label
Fate, time, and language : an essay on free will : David Foster Wallace, edited by Steven M. Cahn and Maureen Eckert ; introduction by James Ryerson ; epilogue by Jay Garfield, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"Richard Taylor's 'Fatalism' and the semantics of physical modality"--T.p. verso
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Control code
OCM1bookssj0000436447
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9780231527071
Isbn Type
(e-book)
Lccn
2010022971
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0000436447
Label
Fate, time, and language : an essay on free will : David Foster Wallace, edited by Steven M. Cahn and Maureen Eckert ; introduction by James Ryerson ; epilogue by Jay Garfield, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
"Richard Taylor's 'Fatalism' and the semantics of physical modality"--T.p. verso
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Control code
OCM1bookssj0000436447
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9780231527071
Isbn Type
(e-book)
Lccn
2010022971
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0000436447

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