Coverart for item
The Resource Imaginary betrayals : subjectivity and the discourses of treason in early modern England, Karen Cunningham

Imaginary betrayals : subjectivity and the discourses of treason in early modern England, Karen Cunningham

Label
Imaginary betrayals : subjectivity and the discourses of treason in early modern England
Title
Imaginary betrayals
Title remainder
subjectivity and the discourses of treason in early modern England
Statement of responsibility
Karen Cunningham
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
"Referring to the extensive early modern literature on the subject of treason, Imaginary Betrayals reveals how and to what extent ideas of proof and grounds for conviction were subject to prosecutorial construction during the Tudor period. Karen Cunningham looks at contemporary records of three prominent cases in order to demonstrate the degree to which the imagination was used to prove treason: the 1542 attainder of Katherine Howard, fifth wife of Heavy VIII, charged with having had sexual relations with two men before her marriage; the 1586 case of Anthony Babington and twelve confederates, accused of plotting with the Spanish to invade England and assassinate Elizabeth; and the prosecution in the same year of Mary, Queen of Scots, indicted for conspiring with Babington to engineer her own accession to the throne." "Linking the inventiveness of the accusations and decisions in these cases to the production of contemporary playtexts by Udall, Shakespeare, Marlowe, and Kyd, Imaginary Betrayals demonstrates how the emerging, flexible discourses of treason participate in defining both individual subjectivity and the legitimate Tudor state. Concerned with competing representations of self and nationhood, Imaginary Betrayals explores the implications of legal and literary representations in which female sexuality, male friendship, or private letters are converted into the signs of treacherous imaginations."--Jacket
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cunningham, Karen
Dewey number
822/.309358
Index
index present
LC call number
PR658.T77
LC item number
C86 2002
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English drama
  • Treason in literature
  • English drama
  • Trials (Treason)
  • Law and literature
  • Subjectivity in literature
  • Sex role in literature
  • Betrayal in literature
  • Law in literature
  • Trials (Treason)
Label
Imaginary betrayals : subjectivity and the discourses of treason in early modern England, Karen Cunningham
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [187]-201) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. "Fugitive Forms": Imagining the Realm -- 2. Female Fidelities on Trial -- 3. Masculinity, Affiliation, and Rootlessness -- 4. Secrecy and the Epistolary Self
Control code
47650829
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
216 pages
Isbn
9780812236408
Isbn Type
(cloth : alk. paper)
Lccn
2001041541
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Label
Imaginary betrayals : subjectivity and the discourses of treason in early modern England, Karen Cunningham
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [187]-201) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. "Fugitive Forms": Imagining the Realm -- 2. Female Fidelities on Trial -- 3. Masculinity, Affiliation, and Rootlessness -- 4. Secrecy and the Epistolary Self
Control code
47650829
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
216 pages
Isbn
9780812236408
Isbn Type
(cloth : alk. paper)
Lccn
2001041541
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n

Library Locations

    • Thomas Jefferson LibraryBorrow it
      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
Processing Feedback ...