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The Resource Insect molecular genetics : an introduction to principles and applications, Marjorie A. Hoy

Insect molecular genetics : an introduction to principles and applications, Marjorie A. Hoy

Label
Insect molecular genetics : an introduction to principles and applications
Title
Insect molecular genetics
Title remainder
an introduction to principles and applications
Statement of responsibility
Marjorie A. Hoy
Creator
Author
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book summarizes and synthesizes two rather disparate disciplines-entomology and molecular genetics. It provides an introduction to the techniques and literature of molecular genetics; defines terminology; and reviews concepts, principles, and applications of these powerful tools
Member of
Cataloging source
GZM
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Hoy, Marjorie A
Dewey number
595.7
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QL493
LC item number
.H69 2013
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Insects
  • Arthropods
  • Chemical Phenomena
  • Phenomena and Processes
  • Biochemical Phenomena
  • Invertebrates
  • Animals
  • Eukaryota
  • Organisms
  • Insecta
  • Molecular Structure
  • Genetic Phenomena
  • SCIENCE
  • Insects
  • Zoology
  • Health & Biological Sciences
  • Invertebrates & Protozoa
Label
Insect molecular genetics : an introduction to principles and applications, Marjorie A. Hoy
Instantiates
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Note continued: 9.3.P Elements and Hybrid Dysgenesis -- 9.4.P-Element Structure Varies -- 9.5. Transposition Method of P Elements -- 9.6. Origin of P Elements in D. melanogaster -- 9.7.P Vectors and Germ-Line Transformation -- 9.7.1. Protocols -- 9.7.2. Characterizing Transformants -- 9.8. Using P-Element Vectors -- 9.8.1. Transposon Tagging -- 9.8.2. Expressing Exogenous Genes -- 9.8.3. Evaluating Position Effects -- 9.8.4. Targeted Gene Transfer -- 9.9. Transformation of Other Insects with P Vectors -- 9.10. Evolution of Resistance to P Elements -- 9.11. Using P to Drive Genes into Populations -- 9.12. Relationship of P to Other Transposable Elements (TEs) -- 9.13. Other TEs Can Transform D. melanogaster -- 9.14. Improved Transformation Tools for Drosophila -- 9.15. TE Vectors to Transform Insects other than Drosophila -- 9.15.1.piggyBac -- 9.15.2. Hermes and Herves -- 9.15.3. Minos -- 9.15.4.mariner -- 9.15.5.hobo -- 9.16. Cross Mobilization of TE Vectors -- 9.17. Conversion of Inactive TE Vectors to Activity -- 9.18. Suppression of Transgene Expression -- 9.19. Other Transformation Methods -- 9.19.1. JcDNV Gene Vectors for Somatic Transformations v -- 9.19.2. RNAi for Drosophila -- 9.19.3. Zinc-Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) -- 9.19.4. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) -- 9.19.5. Meganucleases (or Homing Endonucleases) -- 9.19.6. Cell-Penetrating Peptides -- 9.19.7. Nanotechnology Approaches -- 9.20. Conclusions -- General References -- References Cited -- pt. III APPLICATIONS IN ENTOMOLOGY -- ch. 10 Sex Determination in Insects -- 10.1. Overview -- 10.2. Introduction -- 10.3. Costs and Benefits of Sexual Reproduction -- 10.3.1. Sexual Reproduction Has Costs -- 10.3.2. Advantages of Sex Must Be Large -- 10.3.3. Origin of Sex -- 10.4. Sex Determination Involves Soma and Germ-Line Tissues -- 10.5. Sex Determination in Drosophila melanogaster -- 10.5.1. Dosage Compensation of X Chromosomes -- 10.5.2. Somatic-Sex Determination -- 10.5.3. Germ-Line Determination -- 10.6. Are Sex-Determination Mechanisms Diverse? -- 10.6.1. Intraspecific Variability -- 10.6.2. Environmental Effects -- 10.6.3. Postzygotic Sex Determination -- 10.7.A Single Model? -- 10.8. Meiotic Drive Can Distort Sex Ratios -- 10.8.1. Segregation Distorter (SD) -- 10.8.2. Distorter in Mosquitoes -- 10.8.3. Female-Biased Sex Ratios in Stalk-Eyed Flies -- 10.8.4. Meiotic Drive as a Pest-Management Tool? -- 10.9. Hybrid Sterility -- 10.10. Medea in Tribolium -- 10.11. Cytoplasmic Agents Distort Normal Sex Ratios -- 10.11.1. Spiroplasma Strains -- 10.11.2.L-Form Bacteria -- 10.11.3. Rickettsia -- 10.11.4. Wolbachia -- 10.11.5. Cardinium -- 10.12. Paternal Sex-Ratio Chromosomes and Cytoplasmic Incompatibility in Nasonia -- 10.13. Male Killing in the Coccinellidae -- 10.14. Sex and the Sorted Insects -- 10.14.1. Genetic Control -- 10.14.2. Genetic Improvement of Parasitoids -- 10.15. Conclusion -- References Cited -- ch. 11 Molecular Genetics of Insect Behavior -- 11.1. Overview -- 11.2. Introduction -- 11.3. The Insect Nervous System -- 11.4. Traditional Genetic Analyses of Behavior -- 11.4.1. Crossing Experiments -- 11.4.2. Selection Experiments -- 11.4.3. Some Polygenically Determined Behaviors -- 11.5. Molecular-Genetic Analyses of Insect Behavior -- 11.5.1. The Photoperiodic Clock -- 11.5.2. Learning in Drosophila -- 11.5.3. Functional Genomics of Odor Behavior in Drosophila -- 11.5.4. Behavior of Apis mellifera -- 11.5.5. Pheromones in Insects -- 11.5.6. Neurobiochemistry of Drosophila -- 11.5.7. Divergent Functions of Est-6 and Est-5 in Two Drosophila Species: A Cautionary Tale of Homologs -- 11.5.8. Courtship Behavior in Drosophila -- 11.5.9. Speciation Genes in Drosophila and Other Insects -- 11.5.10. Personality in Insects: Tribolium confusum, Apis mellifera, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and Pyrrhocoris apterus -- 11.6. Symbionts and Insect Behavior -- 11.7. Human Neurodegenerative Diseases and Addictions in Drosophila -- 11.8. High-Throughput Ethomics -- 11.9. Systems Genetics of Complex Traits in Drosophila -- 11.10. Social Behavior in Bees and Ants -- 11.11. Conclusions -- References Cited -- ch. 12 Molecular Systematics and the Evolution of Arthropods -- 12.1. Overview -- 12.2. Introduction -- 12.3. Controversies in Molecular Systematics and Evolution -- 12.3.1. Molecular versus Morphological Traits -- 12.3.2. The Molecular Clock -- 12.3.3. The Neutral (or Nearly Neutral) Theory of Evolution -- 12.3.4. Homology and Similarity -- 12.4. Molecular Methods for Molecular Systematics and Evolution -- 12.4.1. Protein Electrophoresis -- 12.4.2. Molecular Cytology -- 12.4.3. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) Analysis -- 12.4.4. DNA and Genome Sequencing -- 12.4.5. Fragment Analyses of Genomic DNA -- 12.5. Targets of DNA Analysis -- 12.5.1. Mitochondria -- 12.5.2. Ribosomal RNA -- 12.5.3. Satellite DNA -- 12.5.4. Introns -- 12.5.5. Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes -- 12.5.6. Rare Genomic Changes -- 12.5.7. MicroRNAs -- 12.6. Steps in Phylogenetic Analysis of DNA Sequence Data -- 12.6.1. Gene Trees or Species Trees -- 12.6.2. Rooted or Unrooted Trees -- 12.6.3. Tree Types -- 12.6.4. Project Goals and Appropriate DNA Sequences -- 12.6.5. Sequence Comparisons with BLAST -- 12.6.6. Aligning Sequences -- 12.6.7. Constructing Phylogenies -- 12.6.8. Artifacts -- 12.6.9. Software Packages -- 12.7. The Universal Tree of Life -- 12.7.1. Two Domains -- 12.7.2. Three Domains -- 12.7.3. Origin of Eukaryota -- 12.8. The Fossil Record of Arthropods -- 12.9. Molecular Analyses of Arthropod Phylogeny -- 12.9.1. Evolution of the Ecdysozoa -- 12.9.2. Relationships among the Arthropoda -- 12.9.3. The Phylogeny of the Holometabola -- 12.9.4. Congruence Between Morphology- and Molecular-Based Trees -- 12.9.5. Genomes and Arthropod Phylogenies -- 12.10. Molecular Evolution and Speciation -- 12.10.1. Species Concepts -- 12.10.2. How Many Genes are Involved in Speciation? -- 12.10.3. Detecting Cryptic Species -- 12.11. Some Conclusions -- Relevant Journals -- References Cited -- ch. 13 Insect Population Ecology and Molecular Genetics -- 13.1. Overview -- 13.2. Introduction -- 13.3. What is Molecular Ecology? -- 13.4. Collecting Arthropods in the Field for Analysis -- 13.5. Molecular Ecological Methods -- 13.5.1. Allele-Specific PCR -- 13.5.2. Allozymes (Protein Electrophoresis) -- 13.5.3. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP-PCR) -- 13.5.4. Double-Strand Conformation Polymorphism (DSCP) -- 13.5.5. Heteroduplex Analysis (HDA) -- 13.5.6. Microarrays -- 13.5.7. Microsatellites -- 13.5.8. RFLP Analysis -- 13.5.9. PCR-RFLP -- 13.5.10. RAPD-PCR -- 13.5.11. Sequencing -- 13.5.12. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Markers -- 13.6. Analysis of Molecular Data -- 13.6.1. Allozymes -- 13.6.2. Microsatellites -- 13.6.3. RAPD-PCR -- 13.6.4. RFLPs -- 13.6.5. Sequencing -- 13.7. Case Studies in Molecular Ecology and Population Biology -- 13.7.1. Genetic Variability in the Fall Army worm: Incipient Species or Multiple Species? -- 13.7.2. Analyses of Natural Enemies -- 13.7.3. Population Isolation and Introgression in Periodical Cicadas -- 13.7.4. Eradicating Medflies in California? -- 13.7.5. Plant Defenses to Insect Herbivory -- 13.7.6. Origins of Insect Populations -- 13.8. Applied Pest Management -- 13.8.1. Monitoring Biotypes, Species, and Cryptic Species -- 13.8.2. Monitoring Vectors of Disease -- 13.8.3. Pesticide Resistances and Pest Management -- 13.8.4. Monitoring Pest-Population Biology -- 13.8.5. The "So What?" Test -- Relevant Journals -- References Cited -- ch. 14 Genetic Modification of Pest and Beneficial Insects for Pest-Management Programs -- 14.1. Overview -- 14.2. Introduction -- 14.3. Why Genetically Modify Insects? -- 14.3.1. Beneficial Insects -- 14.3.2. Pest Insects -- 14.4. Why Use Molecular-Genetic Methods? -- 14.5. What Genetic Modification Methods are Available? -- 14.5.1. Transposable-Element (TE) Vectors and Transgenesis -- 14.5.2
  • Paratransgenesis (Genetic Modification of Symbionts) -- 14.5.3. Viral Vectors -- 14.5.4. Transfer of Wolbachia from Another Arthropod -- 14.5.5. Site-Specific Modifications -- 14.5.6. No Vectors -- 14.5.7. RNAi to Control Pests -- 14.6. Methods to Deliver Exogenous Nucleic Acids into Arthropod Tissues -- 14.7. What Genes are Available? -- 14.8. Why are Regulatory Signals Important? -- 14.9. How are Modified Arthropods Identified? -- 14.10. How to Deploy Genetically Modified Pest and Beneficial Arthropods -- 14.11. Potential Risks Associated with Releases of Genetically Modified Arthropods -- 14.11.1. Could Gene Silencing Reduce Program Effectiveness? -- 14.11.2. Relative Risks -- 14.11.3. General Risk Issues -- 14.11.4. Horizontal Transfer (HT) -- 14.12. Permanent Releases of Genetically Modified Arthropods into the Environment -- 14.12.1. Models to Predict? -- 14.13. Regulatory Issues: Releases of Genetically Modified Arthropods -- 14.14. Conclusions -- References Cited
Control code
839882342
Edition
Third edition.
Extent
1 online resource (xxvii, 808 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780240821313
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)839882342
Label
Insect molecular genetics : an introduction to principles and applications, Marjorie A. Hoy
Publication
Copyright
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Note continued: 9.3.P Elements and Hybrid Dysgenesis -- 9.4.P-Element Structure Varies -- 9.5. Transposition Method of P Elements -- 9.6. Origin of P Elements in D. melanogaster -- 9.7.P Vectors and Germ-Line Transformation -- 9.7.1. Protocols -- 9.7.2. Characterizing Transformants -- 9.8. Using P-Element Vectors -- 9.8.1. Transposon Tagging -- 9.8.2. Expressing Exogenous Genes -- 9.8.3. Evaluating Position Effects -- 9.8.4. Targeted Gene Transfer -- 9.9. Transformation of Other Insects with P Vectors -- 9.10. Evolution of Resistance to P Elements -- 9.11. Using P to Drive Genes into Populations -- 9.12. Relationship of P to Other Transposable Elements (TEs) -- 9.13. Other TEs Can Transform D. melanogaster -- 9.14. Improved Transformation Tools for Drosophila -- 9.15. TE Vectors to Transform Insects other than Drosophila -- 9.15.1.piggyBac -- 9.15.2. Hermes and Herves -- 9.15.3. Minos -- 9.15.4.mariner -- 9.15.5.hobo -- 9.16. Cross Mobilization of TE Vectors -- 9.17. Conversion of Inactive TE Vectors to Activity -- 9.18. Suppression of Transgene Expression -- 9.19. Other Transformation Methods -- 9.19.1. JcDNV Gene Vectors for Somatic Transformations v -- 9.19.2. RNAi for Drosophila -- 9.19.3. Zinc-Finger Nucleases (ZFNs) -- 9.19.4. Transcription Activator-Like Effector Nucleases (TALENs) -- 9.19.5. Meganucleases (or Homing Endonucleases) -- 9.19.6. Cell-Penetrating Peptides -- 9.19.7. Nanotechnology Approaches -- 9.20. Conclusions -- General References -- References Cited -- pt. III APPLICATIONS IN ENTOMOLOGY -- ch. 10 Sex Determination in Insects -- 10.1. Overview -- 10.2. Introduction -- 10.3. Costs and Benefits of Sexual Reproduction -- 10.3.1. Sexual Reproduction Has Costs -- 10.3.2. Advantages of Sex Must Be Large -- 10.3.3. Origin of Sex -- 10.4. Sex Determination Involves Soma and Germ-Line Tissues -- 10.5. Sex Determination in Drosophila melanogaster -- 10.5.1. Dosage Compensation of X Chromosomes -- 10.5.2. Somatic-Sex Determination -- 10.5.3. Germ-Line Determination -- 10.6. Are Sex-Determination Mechanisms Diverse? -- 10.6.1. Intraspecific Variability -- 10.6.2. Environmental Effects -- 10.6.3. Postzygotic Sex Determination -- 10.7.A Single Model? -- 10.8. Meiotic Drive Can Distort Sex Ratios -- 10.8.1. Segregation Distorter (SD) -- 10.8.2. Distorter in Mosquitoes -- 10.8.3. Female-Biased Sex Ratios in Stalk-Eyed Flies -- 10.8.4. Meiotic Drive as a Pest-Management Tool? -- 10.9. Hybrid Sterility -- 10.10. Medea in Tribolium -- 10.11. Cytoplasmic Agents Distort Normal Sex Ratios -- 10.11.1. Spiroplasma Strains -- 10.11.2.L-Form Bacteria -- 10.11.3. Rickettsia -- 10.11.4. Wolbachia -- 10.11.5. Cardinium -- 10.12. Paternal Sex-Ratio Chromosomes and Cytoplasmic Incompatibility in Nasonia -- 10.13. Male Killing in the Coccinellidae -- 10.14. Sex and the Sorted Insects -- 10.14.1. Genetic Control -- 10.14.2. Genetic Improvement of Parasitoids -- 10.15. Conclusion -- References Cited -- ch. 11 Molecular Genetics of Insect Behavior -- 11.1. Overview -- 11.2. Introduction -- 11.3. The Insect Nervous System -- 11.4. Traditional Genetic Analyses of Behavior -- 11.4.1. Crossing Experiments -- 11.4.2. Selection Experiments -- 11.4.3. Some Polygenically Determined Behaviors -- 11.5. Molecular-Genetic Analyses of Insect Behavior -- 11.5.1. The Photoperiodic Clock -- 11.5.2. Learning in Drosophila -- 11.5.3. Functional Genomics of Odor Behavior in Drosophila -- 11.5.4. Behavior of Apis mellifera -- 11.5.5. Pheromones in Insects -- 11.5.6. Neurobiochemistry of Drosophila -- 11.5.7. Divergent Functions of Est-6 and Est-5 in Two Drosophila Species: A Cautionary Tale of Homologs -- 11.5.8. Courtship Behavior in Drosophila -- 11.5.9. Speciation Genes in Drosophila and Other Insects -- 11.5.10. Personality in Insects: Tribolium confusum, Apis mellifera, Acyrthosiphon pisum, and Pyrrhocoris apterus -- 11.6. Symbionts and Insect Behavior -- 11.7. Human Neurodegenerative Diseases and Addictions in Drosophila -- 11.8. High-Throughput Ethomics -- 11.9. Systems Genetics of Complex Traits in Drosophila -- 11.10. Social Behavior in Bees and Ants -- 11.11. Conclusions -- References Cited -- ch. 12 Molecular Systematics and the Evolution of Arthropods -- 12.1. Overview -- 12.2. Introduction -- 12.3. Controversies in Molecular Systematics and Evolution -- 12.3.1. Molecular versus Morphological Traits -- 12.3.2. The Molecular Clock -- 12.3.3. The Neutral (or Nearly Neutral) Theory of Evolution -- 12.3.4. Homology and Similarity -- 12.4. Molecular Methods for Molecular Systematics and Evolution -- 12.4.1. Protein Electrophoresis -- 12.4.2. Molecular Cytology -- 12.4.3. Restriction Fragment Length Polymorphism (RFLP) Analysis -- 12.4.4. DNA and Genome Sequencing -- 12.4.5. Fragment Analyses of Genomic DNA -- 12.5. Targets of DNA Analysis -- 12.5.1. Mitochondria -- 12.5.2. Ribosomal RNA -- 12.5.3. Satellite DNA -- 12.5.4. Introns -- 12.5.5. Nuclear Protein-Coding Genes -- 12.5.6. Rare Genomic Changes -- 12.5.7. MicroRNAs -- 12.6. Steps in Phylogenetic Analysis of DNA Sequence Data -- 12.6.1. Gene Trees or Species Trees -- 12.6.2. Rooted or Unrooted Trees -- 12.6.3. Tree Types -- 12.6.4. Project Goals and Appropriate DNA Sequences -- 12.6.5. Sequence Comparisons with BLAST -- 12.6.6. Aligning Sequences -- 12.6.7. Constructing Phylogenies -- 12.6.8. Artifacts -- 12.6.9. Software Packages -- 12.7. The Universal Tree of Life -- 12.7.1. Two Domains -- 12.7.2. Three Domains -- 12.7.3. Origin of Eukaryota -- 12.8. The Fossil Record of Arthropods -- 12.9. Molecular Analyses of Arthropod Phylogeny -- 12.9.1. Evolution of the Ecdysozoa -- 12.9.2. Relationships among the Arthropoda -- 12.9.3. The Phylogeny of the Holometabola -- 12.9.4. Congruence Between Morphology- and Molecular-Based Trees -- 12.9.5. Genomes and Arthropod Phylogenies -- 12.10. Molecular Evolution and Speciation -- 12.10.1. Species Concepts -- 12.10.2. How Many Genes are Involved in Speciation? -- 12.10.3. Detecting Cryptic Species -- 12.11. Some Conclusions -- Relevant Journals -- References Cited -- ch. 13 Insect Population Ecology and Molecular Genetics -- 13.1. Overview -- 13.2. Introduction -- 13.3. What is Molecular Ecology? -- 13.4. Collecting Arthropods in the Field for Analysis -- 13.5. Molecular Ecological Methods -- 13.5.1. Allele-Specific PCR -- 13.5.2. Allozymes (Protein Electrophoresis) -- 13.5.3. Amplified Fragment Length Polymorphisms (AFLP-PCR) -- 13.5.4. Double-Strand Conformation Polymorphism (DSCP) -- 13.5.5. Heteroduplex Analysis (HDA) -- 13.5.6. Microarrays -- 13.5.7. Microsatellites -- 13.5.8. RFLP Analysis -- 13.5.9. PCR-RFLP -- 13.5.10. RAPD-PCR -- 13.5.11. Sequencing -- 13.5.12. Single Nucleotide Polymorphism (SNP) Markers -- 13.6. Analysis of Molecular Data -- 13.6.1. Allozymes -- 13.6.2. Microsatellites -- 13.6.3. RAPD-PCR -- 13.6.4. RFLPs -- 13.6.5. Sequencing -- 13.7. Case Studies in Molecular Ecology and Population Biology -- 13.7.1. Genetic Variability in the Fall Army worm: Incipient Species or Multiple Species? -- 13.7.2. Analyses of Natural Enemies -- 13.7.3. Population Isolation and Introgression in Periodical Cicadas -- 13.7.4. Eradicating Medflies in California? -- 13.7.5. Plant Defenses to Insect Herbivory -- 13.7.6. Origins of Insect Populations -- 13.8. Applied Pest Management -- 13.8.1. Monitoring Biotypes, Species, and Cryptic Species -- 13.8.2. Monitoring Vectors of Disease -- 13.8.3. Pesticide Resistances and Pest Management -- 13.8.4. Monitoring Pest-Population Biology -- 13.8.5. The "So What?" Test -- Relevant Journals -- References Cited -- ch. 14 Genetic Modification of Pest and Beneficial Insects for Pest-Management Programs -- 14.1. Overview -- 14.2. Introduction -- 14.3. Why Genetically Modify Insects? -- 14.3.1. Beneficial Insects -- 14.3.2. Pest Insects -- 14.4. Why Use Molecular-Genetic Methods? -- 14.5. What Genetic Modification Methods are Available? -- 14.5.1. Transposable-Element (TE) Vectors and Transgenesis -- 14.5.2
  • Paratransgenesis (Genetic Modification of Symbionts) -- 14.5.3. Viral Vectors -- 14.5.4. Transfer of Wolbachia from Another Arthropod -- 14.5.5. Site-Specific Modifications -- 14.5.6. No Vectors -- 14.5.7. RNAi to Control Pests -- 14.6. Methods to Deliver Exogenous Nucleic Acids into Arthropod Tissues -- 14.7. What Genes are Available? -- 14.8. Why are Regulatory Signals Important? -- 14.9. How are Modified Arthropods Identified? -- 14.10. How to Deploy Genetically Modified Pest and Beneficial Arthropods -- 14.11. Potential Risks Associated with Releases of Genetically Modified Arthropods -- 14.11.1. Could Gene Silencing Reduce Program Effectiveness? -- 14.11.2. Relative Risks -- 14.11.3. General Risk Issues -- 14.11.4. Horizontal Transfer (HT) -- 14.12. Permanent Releases of Genetically Modified Arthropods into the Environment -- 14.12.1. Models to Predict? -- 14.13. Regulatory Issues: Releases of Genetically Modified Arthropods -- 14.14. Conclusions -- References Cited
Control code
839882342
Edition
Third edition.
Extent
1 online resource (xxvii, 808 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780240821313
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)839882342

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