Coverart for item
The Resource Kipling's America : travel letters, 1889-1895, D.H. Stewart, editor

Kipling's America : travel letters, 1889-1895, D.H. Stewart, editor

Label
Kipling's America : travel letters, 1889-1895
Title
Kipling's America
Title remainder
travel letters, 1889-1895
Statement of responsibility
D.H. Stewart, editor
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Kipling was just twenty-three years old when he reached San Francisco in May 1889; he immediately began recording the sights and sounds of boom-town America. For four months he toured the United States, publishing accounts of his journey in the Pioneer, a major newspaper in western India. A few years later, when he lived in Vermont, Kipling wrote several syndicated articles published in both England and the U.S. Then in 1899 he revised and abridged the Pioneer versions and published them in From Sea to Sea. The second series of syndicated articles he collected in Letters of Travel (1920). Most of these travel writings are now out of print. In Kipling's America, Professor D.H. Stewart brings all of these articles together and reproduces the original printed versions
  • Readers are provided with the opportunity to hear again Kipling at his cocky and often opinionated best. From Kipling's perspective, America unleashed the chaotic energy latent in human beings, and he was uncertain whether this energy inevitably would be productive or destructive." "That some of his impressions were one-dimensional is undeniable, but equally undeniable is his gift of language - his access to a ready lexicon often composed of what he termed a "perpetual Pentecost" to describe the "talking in tongues" heard in British Overseas Clubs throughout the Empire. This hodgepodge of European languages (counter-pointed with pidgin English, Chinese, Hindi, American) produced a symphony (or cacophony) of bountiful word play."--Jacket
Member of
Cataloging source
COO
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1865-1936
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kipling, Rudyard
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
PR4856
LC item number
.K577 2003
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Stewart, D. H
Series statement
1880-1920 British authors series
Series volume
no. 17
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Kipling, Rudyard
  • United States
Label
Kipling's America : travel letters, 1889-1895, D.H. Stewart, editor
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
I: From sea to sea (1889) -- 1: Shows how I came to America before my time and was much shaken in body and soul by what I felt and heard -- 2: How I got to San Francisco and took tea with the natives there -- 3: Shows how through folly I assisted at a murder and was proportionally afraid, the rule of the democracy and the despotism of the alien -- 4: (untitled) -- 5: Tells how I dropped into politics and the tenderer sentiments, contains a moral treatise on American maidens and an ethnological one on the Hubshi. Ends with a banquet and a type-writer -- 6: Takes me through Bret Harte's country, and to Portland with "old man California." Explains how two vagabonds became homesick through looking at other people's houses -- 7: Shows how I caught salmon in the Clackamas and clothed myself in purple and triumph -- 8: Discusses the shortcomings of Tacoma-on-the-boom and Seattle-after-the-fire. Introduces a heretic -- 9: Takes me from Vancouver to the Yellowstone National Park-with a mean opinion of myself and a meaner of rayments's tourists -- 10: Shows how Yankee Jim introduced me to Diana of the crossways on the banks of the Yellowstone, and how a German Jew said I was no true citizen. Ends with the celebration of the 4th of July and a few lessons therefrom -- 11: Shows how I entered Mazanderan of the Persians and saw devils of every colour, and some troopers. Hell and the old lady from Chicago. The captain and the lieutenant -- 12: Ends with the canyon of the Yellowstone, the maiden from New Hampshire, Larry, "wrap-up-his-tail" Tom, the old lady from Chicago, and a few natural phenomena, including one Briton -- 13: Of the American army and the city of the saints. The temple, the book of Mormon, and the girl from Dorset. An Oriental consideration of polygamy -- 14: How I met certain people of importance between Salt Lake and Omaha -- 15: Across the great divide, and how the man Gring showed me the garments of the Ellewomen -- 16: How I struck Chicago, and how Chicago struck me. Of religion, politics, and pig-sticking, -- and the incarnation of the city among shambles -- 17. How I found peace at Musquash on the Monongahela -- 18. Tells how the professor and I found the precious rediculouses and how they Chautauquacked at us. Puts into print some sentiments better left unrecorded, and proves that a neglected theory will blossom in congenial soil. Contains fragments of three lectures and a confession -- 19: Kipling's view of out defenceless coasts -- 20: Rudyard Kipling on Mark Twain -- II: From tideway to Tideway (1892-1895) -- 1: In sight of Monadnock -- 2: Across the continent (excerpt) -- 3: What Rudyard Kipling saw on his way back from Japan (excerpt) -- 4: On one side only -- 5: From a winter note-book (1895)
Control code
53875156
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xlii, 282 pages
Isbn
9780944318171
Lccn
2003108463
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations
Label
Kipling's America : travel letters, 1889-1895, D.H. Stewart, editor
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
I: From sea to sea (1889) -- 1: Shows how I came to America before my time and was much shaken in body and soul by what I felt and heard -- 2: How I got to San Francisco and took tea with the natives there -- 3: Shows how through folly I assisted at a murder and was proportionally afraid, the rule of the democracy and the despotism of the alien -- 4: (untitled) -- 5: Tells how I dropped into politics and the tenderer sentiments, contains a moral treatise on American maidens and an ethnological one on the Hubshi. Ends with a banquet and a type-writer -- 6: Takes me through Bret Harte's country, and to Portland with "old man California." Explains how two vagabonds became homesick through looking at other people's houses -- 7: Shows how I caught salmon in the Clackamas and clothed myself in purple and triumph -- 8: Discusses the shortcomings of Tacoma-on-the-boom and Seattle-after-the-fire. Introduces a heretic -- 9: Takes me from Vancouver to the Yellowstone National Park-with a mean opinion of myself and a meaner of rayments's tourists -- 10: Shows how Yankee Jim introduced me to Diana of the crossways on the banks of the Yellowstone, and how a German Jew said I was no true citizen. Ends with the celebration of the 4th of July and a few lessons therefrom -- 11: Shows how I entered Mazanderan of the Persians and saw devils of every colour, and some troopers. Hell and the old lady from Chicago. The captain and the lieutenant -- 12: Ends with the canyon of the Yellowstone, the maiden from New Hampshire, Larry, "wrap-up-his-tail" Tom, the old lady from Chicago, and a few natural phenomena, including one Briton -- 13: Of the American army and the city of the saints. The temple, the book of Mormon, and the girl from Dorset. An Oriental consideration of polygamy -- 14: How I met certain people of importance between Salt Lake and Omaha -- 15: Across the great divide, and how the man Gring showed me the garments of the Ellewomen -- 16: How I struck Chicago, and how Chicago struck me. Of religion, politics, and pig-sticking, -- and the incarnation of the city among shambles -- 17. How I found peace at Musquash on the Monongahela -- 18. Tells how the professor and I found the precious rediculouses and how they Chautauquacked at us. Puts into print some sentiments better left unrecorded, and proves that a neglected theory will blossom in congenial soil. Contains fragments of three lectures and a confession -- 19: Kipling's view of out defenceless coasts -- 20: Rudyard Kipling on Mark Twain -- II: From tideway to Tideway (1892-1895) -- 1: In sight of Monadnock -- 2: Across the continent (excerpt) -- 3: What Rudyard Kipling saw on his way back from Japan (excerpt) -- 4: On one side only -- 5: From a winter note-book (1895)
Control code
53875156
Dimensions
23 cm
Extent
xlii, 282 pages
Isbn
9780944318171
Lccn
2003108463
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations

Library Locations

    • Thomas Jefferson LibraryBorrow it
      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
Processing Feedback ...