Coverart for item
The Resource Lying at the semantics-pragmatics interface, Jörg Meibauer

Lying at the semantics-pragmatics interface, Jörg Meibauer

Label
Lying at the semantics-pragmatics interface
Title
Lying at the semantics-pragmatics interface
Statement of responsibility
Jörg Meibauer
Creator
Author
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
<!Doctype html public ""-//w3c//dtd html 4.0 transitional//en""> <html><head> <meta content=""text/html; charset=iso-8859-1"" http-equiv=content-type> <meta name=generator content=""mshtml 8.00.6001.23580""></head> <body> While lying has been a topic in the philosophy of language, there has been a lack of genuine linguistic analysis of lying. Exploring lying at the semantics-pragmatics interface, this book takes a contextualist stand by arguing that untruthful implicatures and presuppositions are part of the total signification of the act of lying. </body></html>
Member of
Cataloging source
CN3GA
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Meibauer, Jörg
Dewey number
401/.45
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
Language note
English
LC call number
P99.4.P72
LC item number
M45 2014
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Mouton series in pragmatics
Series volume
volume 14
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Pragmatics
  • Mythomania
  • Semantics (Philosophy)
  • Linguistics
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • Linguistics
  • Mythomania
  • Pragmatics
  • Semantics (Philosophy)
  • Semantik
  • Pseudologie
  • Assertion
  • Lüge
  • Absicht
  • Eigentlichkeit
Label
Lying at the semantics-pragmatics interface, Jörg Meibauer
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface; 1 Perspectives on lying; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Lying in the private sphere, on the Internet, and in politics; 1.2.1 Lying in the private sphere; 1.2.2 Lying on the Internet; 1.2.3 Lying in politics; 1.3 Ethical versus linguistic perspectives; 1.4 The acquisition of lying; 1.5 Psychological and neurological findings; 1.6 Universality of lying; 1.7 Lying and deceiving; 2 Approaching a linguistic concept of lying; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 The semantics-pragmatics distinction; 2.3 Lexical semantics: The meaning of to lie; 2.4 Interface approach: Lying and sentence types
  • 2.5 The case of relative clauses2.6 Conclusions; 3 Assertion and lying; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Assertion and statement; 3.3 The sincerity condition; 3.4 Perlocution; 3.5 The maxim of Quality; 3.6 Assertoric commitment; 3.7 Truth, truth conditions, and truthfulness; 3.8 Assertion, common ground, and presupposition; 3.9 Indirect assertions and explicit performatives; 3.10 Expressive meaning; 3.11 A simple definition of assertion; 4 Defining lying; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 A definition of lying; 4.3 Intention to deceive; 4.4 Bald-faced lies and self-deception; 4.4.1 Bald-faced lies
  • 4.4.2 Self-deception4.5 Lying and falsely implicating; 4.5.1 Normativity and cancellability; 4.5.2 A definition of conversational implicature; 4.5.3 "Lying while saying the truth": Extended definition of lying; 4.6 Falsely presupposing and falsely conventionally implicating; 4.7 Underdeterminacy and explicature/impliciture; 4.8 Vagueness and imprecision; 4.9 Prosocial lies; 4.10 Conclusions; 5 Interface Problems; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Aspect-sensitivity, or: Did Clinton lie?; 5.3 Fiction; 5.4 Irony and tautology; 5.5 Understatement and overstatement (hyperbole); 5.6 Lying and bullshitting
  • 5.7 Conclusions6 Lying and quotation; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Lying, direct/indirect quotation, and the verbatim assumption; 6.3 Lying and mixed quotation; 6.4 Lying and scare quotation; 6.5 Fairness and transparency; 6.6 The case of the German quotative wollen; 6.7 Conclusions; 7 Relative lies; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Accuracy and disagreement; 7.3 Verum focus; 7.4 The assertion of clarity; 7.5 The assertion of certainty; 7.6 Reliability and selfless assertion; 7.7 Conclusions; Epilogue; References; Index
Control code
905528426
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781614518204
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
366644311163236620
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)905528426
Label
Lying at the semantics-pragmatics interface, Jörg Meibauer
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Preface; 1 Perspectives on lying; 1.1 Introduction; 1.2 Lying in the private sphere, on the Internet, and in politics; 1.2.1 Lying in the private sphere; 1.2.2 Lying on the Internet; 1.2.3 Lying in politics; 1.3 Ethical versus linguistic perspectives; 1.4 The acquisition of lying; 1.5 Psychological and neurological findings; 1.6 Universality of lying; 1.7 Lying and deceiving; 2 Approaching a linguistic concept of lying; 2.1 Introduction; 2.2 The semantics-pragmatics distinction; 2.3 Lexical semantics: The meaning of to lie; 2.4 Interface approach: Lying and sentence types
  • 2.5 The case of relative clauses2.6 Conclusions; 3 Assertion and lying; 3.1 Introduction; 3.2 Assertion and statement; 3.3 The sincerity condition; 3.4 Perlocution; 3.5 The maxim of Quality; 3.6 Assertoric commitment; 3.7 Truth, truth conditions, and truthfulness; 3.8 Assertion, common ground, and presupposition; 3.9 Indirect assertions and explicit performatives; 3.10 Expressive meaning; 3.11 A simple definition of assertion; 4 Defining lying; 4.1 Introduction; 4.2 A definition of lying; 4.3 Intention to deceive; 4.4 Bald-faced lies and self-deception; 4.4.1 Bald-faced lies
  • 4.4.2 Self-deception4.5 Lying and falsely implicating; 4.5.1 Normativity and cancellability; 4.5.2 A definition of conversational implicature; 4.5.3 "Lying while saying the truth": Extended definition of lying; 4.6 Falsely presupposing and falsely conventionally implicating; 4.7 Underdeterminacy and explicature/impliciture; 4.8 Vagueness and imprecision; 4.9 Prosocial lies; 4.10 Conclusions; 5 Interface Problems; 5.1 Introduction; 5.2 Aspect-sensitivity, or: Did Clinton lie?; 5.3 Fiction; 5.4 Irony and tautology; 5.5 Understatement and overstatement (hyperbole); 5.6 Lying and bullshitting
  • 5.7 Conclusions6 Lying and quotation; 6.1 Introduction; 6.2 Lying, direct/indirect quotation, and the verbatim assumption; 6.3 Lying and mixed quotation; 6.4 Lying and scare quotation; 6.5 Fairness and transparency; 6.6 The case of the German quotative wollen; 6.7 Conclusions; 7 Relative lies; 7.1 Introduction; 7.2 Accuracy and disagreement; 7.3 Verum focus; 7.4 The assertion of clarity; 7.5 The assertion of certainty; 7.6 Reliability and selfless assertion; 7.7 Conclusions; Epilogue; References; Index
Control code
905528426
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781614518204
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
366644311163236620
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)905528426

Library Locations

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      38.710138 -90.311107
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