Coverart for item
The Resource Microbiomes of the built environment : a research agenda for indoor microbiology, human health, and buildings, Committee on Microbiomes of the Built Environment: From Research to Application, Board on Life Sciences, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Health and Medicine Division, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, (electronic resource)

Microbiomes of the built environment : a research agenda for indoor microbiology, human health, and buildings, Committee on Microbiomes of the Built Environment: From Research to Application, Board on Life Sciences, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Health and Medicine Division, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, (electronic resource)

Label
Microbiomes of the built environment : a research agenda for indoor microbiology, human health, and buildings
Title
Microbiomes of the built environment
Title remainder
a research agenda for indoor microbiology, human health, and buildings
Statement of responsibility
Committee on Microbiomes of the Built Environment: From Research to Application, Board on Life Sciences, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Health and Medicine Division, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, National Academy of Engineering
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • People's desire to understand the environments in which they live is a natural one. People spend most of their time in spaces and structures designed, built, and managed by humans, and it is estimated that people in developed countries now spend 90 percent of their lives indoors. As people move from homes to workplaces, traveling in cars and on transit systems, microorganisms are continually with and around them. The human-associated microbes that are shed, along with the human behaviors that affect their transport and removal, make significant contributions to the diversity of the indoor microbiome. The characteristics of "healthy" indoor environments cannot yet be defined, nor do microbial, clinical, and building researchers yet understand how to modify features of indoor environments--such as building ventilation systems and the chemistry of building materials--in ways that would have predictable impacts on microbial communities to promote health and prevent disease. The factors that affect the environments within buildings, the ways in which building characteristics influence the composition and function of indoor microbial communities, and the ways in which these microbial communities relate to human health and well-being are extraordinarily complex and can be explored only as a dynamic, interconnected ecosystem by engaging the fields of microbial biology and ecology, chemistry, building science, and human physiology. This report reviews what is known about the intersection of these disciplines, and how new tools may facilitate advances in understanding the ecosystem of built environments, indoor microbiomes, and effects on human health and well-being. It offers a research agenda to generate the information needed so that stakeholders with an interest in understanding the impacts of built environments will be able to make more informed decisions
  • "People's desire to understand the environments in which they live is a natural one. People spend most of their time in spaces and structures designed, built, and managed by humans, and it is estimated that people in developed countries now spend 90 percent of their lives indoors. As people move from homes to workplaces, traveling in cars and on transit systems, microorganisms are continually with and around them. The human-associated microbes that are shed, along with the human behaviors that affect their transport and removal, make significant contributions to the diversity of the indoor microbiome. The characteristics of "healthy" indoor environments cannot yet be defined, nor do microbial, clinical, and building researchers yet understand how to modify features of indoor environments--such as building ventilation systems and the chemistry of building materials--in ways that would have predictable impacts on microbial communities to promote health and prevent disease. The factors that affect the environments within buildings, the ways in which building characteristics influence the composition and function of indoor microbial communities, and the ways in which these microbial communities relate to human health and well-being are extraordinarily complex and can be explored only as a dynamic, interconnected ecosystem by engaging the fields of microbial biology and ecology, chemistry, building science, and human physiology. This report reviews what is known about the intersection of these disciplines, and how new tools may facilitate advances in understanding the ecosystem of built environments, indoor microbiomes, and effects on human health and well-being. It offers a research agenda to generate the information needed so that stakeholders with an interest in understanding the impacts of built environments will be able to make more informed decisions"--
  • "People's desire to understand the environments in which they live is a natural one. People spend most of their time in spaces and structures designed, built, and managed by humans, and it is estimated that people in developed countries now spend 90 percent of their lives indoors. As people move from homes to workplaces, traveling in cars and on transit systems, microorganisms are continually with and around them. The human-associated microbes that are shed, along with the human behaviors that affect their transport and removal, make significant contributions to the diversity of the indoor microbiome. The characteristics of "healthy" indoor environments cannot yet be defined, nor do microbial, clinical, and building researchers yet understand how to modify features of indoor environments--such as building ventilation systems and the chemistry of building materials--in ways that would have predictable impacts on microbial communities to promote health and prevent disease. The factors that affect the environments within buildings, the ways in which building characteristics influence the composition and function of indoor microbial communities, and the ways in which these microbial communities relate to human health and well-being are extraordinarily complex and can be explored only as a dynamic, interconnected ecosystem by engaging the fields of microbial biology and ecology, chemistry, building science, and human physiology. This report reviews what is known about the intersection of these disciplines, and how new tools may facilitate advances in understanding the ecosystem of built environments, indoor microbiomes, and effects on human health and well-being. It offers a research agenda to generate the information needed so that stakeholders with an interest in understanding the impacts of built environments will be able to make more informed decisions"--
Assigning source
  • Publisher's description
  • Publisher's description
Cataloging source
DNLM
Funding information
This activity was supported by Grant No. 2014-13628 from the Alfred P. Sloan Foundation, a grant from the Gordon and Betty Moore Foundation, Grant No. NNX16AC85G from the National Aeronautics and Space Administration, Contract No. HHSN263201200074I with the National Institutes of Health, Contract No. EP-C-14-005/0007 with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and with additional support from the National Academy of Sciences Cecil and Ida Green Fund. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of any organization or agency that provided support for the project.
NLM call number
QW 55
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/organizationName
National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine (U.S.)
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Environmental Microbiology
  • Environment Design
  • Microbiota
  • Ecosystem
Label
Microbiomes of the built environment : a research agenda for indoor microbiology, human health, and buildings, Committee on Microbiomes of the Built Environment: From Research to Application, Board on Life Sciences, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Health and Medicine Division, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001959959
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9780309449809
Lccn
2017952589
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001959959
Label
Microbiomes of the built environment : a research agenda for indoor microbiology, human health, and buildings, Committee on Microbiomes of the Built Environment: From Research to Application, Board on Life Sciences, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Board on Infrastructure and the Constructed Environment, Division on Earth and Life Studies, Health and Medicine Division, Division on Engineering and Physical Sciences, National Academy of Engineering, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001959959
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9780309449809
Lccn
2017952589
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0001959959

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