Coverart for item
The Resource Muslims and Christians in Norman Sicily : Arabic-Speakers and the End of Islam

Muslims and Christians in Norman Sicily : Arabic-Speakers and the End of Islam

Label
Muslims and Christians in Norman Sicily : Arabic-Speakers and the End of Islam
Title
Muslims and Christians in Norman Sicily
Title remainder
Arabic-Speakers and the End of Islam
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
The social and linguistic history of medieval Sicily is both intriguing and complex. Before the Muslim invasion of 827, the islanders spoke dialects of either Greek or Latin or both. On the arrival of the Normans around 1060 Arabic was the dominant language, but by 1250 Sicily was an almost exclusively Christian island, with Romance dialects in evidence everywhere. Of particular importance to the development of Sicily was the formative period of Norman rule (1061 1194), when most of the key transitions from an Arabic-speaking Muslim island to a 'Latin'-speaking Christian one were made. This wo
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Metcalfe, Dr Alexander
Dewey number
945.803
Index
no index present
LC call number
DG867.21
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
dictionaries
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Metcalfe, A.
Series statement
Culture and Civilization in the Middle East
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Muslims
  • Islam
  • Church history
  • Christianity and other religions
  • Sicily (Italy)
  • HISTORY
  • Christianity
  • Church history
  • Interfaith relations
  • Islam
  • Muslims
  • Italy
Label
Muslims and Christians in Norman Sicily : Arabic-Speakers and the End of Islam
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Re-animating the tradition? The reputed language interests of Frederick II
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Half Title; Culture and Civilization in the Middle East; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Transliteration schemes; Map of Sicily; Introduction; 1 Sicily before 1100; Popular perceptions and issues; Early invasions and settlement; Romanization and the 'Siculi trilingues'; The situation at the end of the Byzantine period; The Islamic period (827-1061); The Sicilian 'thema' and responses to raids; Phases of the Islamic conquest of Sicily; Demographic patterns: the Christian exodus?; Conversion, assimilation and degrees of Christian-ness
  • The Islamicization of SicilyRometta; The social and linguistic situation at the end of the Islamic period; The 'Norman conquest' of Sicily?; Events of the conquest; The 'Greeks' and Muslims of Troina; The Sicilian Muslim communities around 1090; 2 The Muslim Community: Language, Religion and Status; Introduction to the issues; Messina and Agrigento: Christians and Muslims; The new rulers and the status quo; Life under 'indirect rule': the fiscal, legal and religious status of Sicilian Muslims; Ibn Ǧubayr's 'Rihḷa' as a historical source; Muslim administrators and Arab-Islamic traditions
  • The Muslims, the Sicilian kings and the Trinacria toposThe 'palace Saracens' and religious ambiguity; The trial and execution of Philip of Mahdiyya; Arabic, Islam and taqiya; The convert Ibn Zur'a; 3 'Normans', 'Lombards', 'Greeks', 'Arabs', 'Berbers' and Jews; Introduction; Twelfth-century terms of reference; The 'ethnicity' question; North African contingents; The Berber question; A model for Berber settlement and dialects?; Introduction to the Sicilian 'Greeks' and Jewish communities; 4 At the margins of the Arabic-speaking communities
  • Defining the margins of the Arabic-speaking communitiesDemographic mobility: the villeins around Cefalù; Naming and identity; Signs of social integration among villeins: Catania and Aci in 1095; Arabic and Greek names from Nicótera in 1093; Patti: 'Saracens', 'Greeks', and 'men of the Latin tongue'; The extent of local variation: an early register from western Sicily; Onomastic data as evidence for social change; Abandoning Arabic names: the Christians of Collesano; Assessing names of mixed origin; Non-Arabic names from the Monreale villeins in 1178; The Christians of Corleone
  • Distinguishing between Muslims and Arabic-speaking Christians5 Communication around the royal palaces and Arabic as a language of the ruling elite; The Sicilian kings through the eyes of Muslim authors; The collapse of Arab-Muslim intellectual activity; The Sicilian kings, their languages and education; The Sicilian translation movement: from Greek and Arabic into Latin; Arabic-speakers among the ruling elite: the 'palace Saracens'; The Mustakhlif in the royal palace; Arabic-speaking ancillary staff in the royal palaces
Control code
869095813
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (619 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781317829249
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)869095813
Label
Muslims and Christians in Norman Sicily : Arabic-Speakers and the End of Islam
Publication
Note
Re-animating the tradition? The reputed language interests of Frederick II
Antecedent source
unknown
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover; Half Title; Culture and Civilization in the Middle East; Title Page; Copyright Page; Table of Contents; Acknowledgements; Abbreviations; Transliteration schemes; Map of Sicily; Introduction; 1 Sicily before 1100; Popular perceptions and issues; Early invasions and settlement; Romanization and the 'Siculi trilingues'; The situation at the end of the Byzantine period; The Islamic period (827-1061); The Sicilian 'thema' and responses to raids; Phases of the Islamic conquest of Sicily; Demographic patterns: the Christian exodus?; Conversion, assimilation and degrees of Christian-ness
  • The Islamicization of SicilyRometta; The social and linguistic situation at the end of the Islamic period; The 'Norman conquest' of Sicily?; Events of the conquest; The 'Greeks' and Muslims of Troina; The Sicilian Muslim communities around 1090; 2 The Muslim Community: Language, Religion and Status; Introduction to the issues; Messina and Agrigento: Christians and Muslims; The new rulers and the status quo; Life under 'indirect rule': the fiscal, legal and religious status of Sicilian Muslims; Ibn Ǧubayr's 'Rihḷa' as a historical source; Muslim administrators and Arab-Islamic traditions
  • The Muslims, the Sicilian kings and the Trinacria toposThe 'palace Saracens' and religious ambiguity; The trial and execution of Philip of Mahdiyya; Arabic, Islam and taqiya; The convert Ibn Zur'a; 3 'Normans', 'Lombards', 'Greeks', 'Arabs', 'Berbers' and Jews; Introduction; Twelfth-century terms of reference; The 'ethnicity' question; North African contingents; The Berber question; A model for Berber settlement and dialects?; Introduction to the Sicilian 'Greeks' and Jewish communities; 4 At the margins of the Arabic-speaking communities
  • Defining the margins of the Arabic-speaking communitiesDemographic mobility: the villeins around Cefalù; Naming and identity; Signs of social integration among villeins: Catania and Aci in 1095; Arabic and Greek names from Nicótera in 1093; Patti: 'Saracens', 'Greeks', and 'men of the Latin tongue'; The extent of local variation: an early register from western Sicily; Onomastic data as evidence for social change; Abandoning Arabic names: the Christians of Collesano; Assessing names of mixed origin; Non-Arabic names from the Monreale villeins in 1178; The Christians of Corleone
  • Distinguishing between Muslims and Arabic-speaking Christians5 Communication around the royal palaces and Arabic as a language of the ruling elite; The Sicilian kings through the eyes of Muslim authors; The collapse of Arab-Muslim intellectual activity; The Sicilian kings, their languages and education; The Sicilian translation movement: from Greek and Arabic into Latin; Arabic-speakers among the ruling elite: the 'palace Saracens'; The Mustakhlif in the royal palace; Arabic-speaking ancillary staff in the royal palaces
Control code
869095813
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (619 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781317829249
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)869095813

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      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
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