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The Resource Photography and September 11th : spectacle, memory, trauma, Jennifer Good, (electronic resource)

Photography and September 11th : spectacle, memory, trauma, Jennifer Good, (electronic resource)

Label
Photography and September 11th : spectacle, memory, trauma
Title
Photography and September 11th
Title remainder
spectacle, memory, trauma
Statement of responsibility
Jennifer Good
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "It is all but impossible to think of September 11th 2001 and not, at the same time, recall an image. The overwhelmingly visual coverage in the world's media pictured a spectacle of terror, from images of the collapsing towers, to injured victims and fatigued firefighters. In the days, weeks and months that followed, this vast collection of photographs continued to circulate relentlessly. This book investigates the psychological impact of those photographs on a stunned American audience. Drawing on trauma theory, this book asks whether the prolonged exposure of audience to photographs was cathartic or damaging. It explores how first the collective memory of the event was established in the American psyche and then argues that through repetitive use of the most powerful pictures, the culture industry created a dangerously simple 9/11 metanarrative. At the same time, people began to reclaim and use photography to process their own feelings, most significantly in 'communities' of photographic memorial websites. Such exercises were widely perceived as democratic and an aid to recovery. This book interrogates that assumption, providing a new understanding of how audiences see and process news photography in times of crisis"--
  • "It is all but impossible to think of September 11th 2001 and not, at the same time, recall an image. The overwhelmingly visual coverage in the world's media pictured a spectacle of terror, from images of the collapsing towers, to injured victims and fatigued firefighters. In the days, weeks and months that followed, this vast collection of images continued to circulate relentlessly. This book investigates the psychological impact of those images on a stunned American audience. Drawing on trauma theory, this book asks whether the prolonged exposure of audience to images was cathartic or damaging. It explores how first the collective memory of the event was established in the American psyche and then argues that through repetitive use of the most powerful pictures, the culture industry created a dangerously simple 9/11 metanarrative. At the same time, people began to reclaim and use photography to process their own feelings, most significantly in 'communities' of photographic memorial websites. Such exercises were widely perceived as democratic and an aid to recovery. This book interrogates that assumption, providing a new understanding of how audiences see and process news photography in times of crisis"--
  • "It is all but impossible to think of September 11th 2001 and not, at the same time, recall an image. The overwhelmingly visual coverage in the world's media pictured a spectacle of terror, from images of the collapsing towers, to injured victims and fatigued firefighters. In the days, weeks and months that followed, this vast collection of photographs continued to circulate relentlessly. This book investigates the psychological impact of those photographs on a stunned American audience. Drawing on trauma theory, this book asks whether the prolonged exposure of audience to photographs was cathartic or damaging. It explores how first the collective memory of the event was established in the American psyche and then argues that through repetitive use of the most powerful pictures, the culture industry created a dangerously simple 9/11 metanarrative. At the same time, people began to reclaim and use photography to process their own feelings, most significantly in 'communities' of photographic memorial websites. Such exercises were widely perceived as democratic and an aid to recovery. This book interrogates that assumption, providing a new understanding of how audiences see and process news photography in times of crisis"--
  • "It is all but impossible to think of September 11th 2001 and not, at the same time, recall an image. The overwhelmingly visual coverage in the world's media pictured a spectacle of terror, from images of the collapsing towers, to injured victims and fatigued firefighters. In the days, weeks and months that followed, this vast collection of images continued to circulate relentlessly. This book investigates the psychological impact of those images on a stunned American audience. Drawing on trauma theory, this book asks whether the prolonged exposure of audience to images was cathartic or damaging. It explores how first the collective memory of the event was established in the American psyche and then argues that through repetitive use of the most powerful pictures, the culture industry created a dangerously simple 9/11 metanarrative. At the same time, people began to reclaim and use photography to process their own feelings, most significantly in 'communities' of photographic memorial websites. Such exercises were widely perceived as democratic and an aid to recovery. This book interrogates that assumption, providing a new understanding of how audiences see and process news photography in times of crisis"--
  • "It is all but impossible to think of September 11th 2001 and not, at the same time, recall an image. The overwhelmingly visual coverage in the world's media pictured a spectacle of terror, from images of the collapsing towers, to injured victims and fatigued firefighters. In the days, weeks and months that followed, this vast collection of photographs continued to circulate relentlessly. This book investigates the psychological impact of those photographs on a stunned American audience. Drawing on trauma theory, this book asks whether the prolonged exposure of audience to photographs was cathartic or damaging. It explores how first the collective memory of the event was established in the American psyche and then argues that through repetitive use of the most powerful pictures, the culture industry created a dangerously simple 9/11 metanarrative. At the same time, people began to reclaim and use photography to process their own feelings, most significantly in 'communities' of photographic memorial websites. Such exercises were widely perceived as democratic and an aid to recovery. This book interrogates that assumption, providing a new understanding of how audiences see and process news photography in times of crisis"--
  • "It is all but impossible to think of September 11th 2001 and not, at the same time, recall an image. The overwhelmingly visual coverage in the world's media pictured a spectacle of terror, from images of the collapsing towers, to injured victims and fatigued firefighters. In the days, weeks and months that followed, this vast collection of images continued to circulate relentlessly. This book investigates the psychological impact of those images on a stunned American audience. Drawing on trauma theory, this book asks whether the prolonged exposure of audience to images was cathartic or damaging. It explores how first the collective memory of the event was established in the American psyche and then argues that through repetitive use of the most powerful pictures, the culture industry created a dangerously simple 9/11 metanarrative. At the same time, people began to reclaim and use photography to process their own feelings, most significantly in 'communities' of photographic memorial websites. Such exercises were widely perceived as democratic and an aid to recovery. This book interrogates that assumption, providing a new understanding of how audiences see and process news photography in times of crisis"--
Assigning source
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
  • Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Good, Jennifer
Dewey number
974.7/1044
LC call number
HV6432.7
LC item number
.G657 2015
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • September 11 Terrorist Attacks, 2001
  • World Trade Center (New York, N.Y.)
  • Terrorism
  • New York (N.Y.)
  • PHOTOGRAPHY / General
  • PHOTOGRAPHY / Photojournalism
  • HISTORY / United States / 21st Century
  • PSYCHOLOGY / Movements / Psychoanalysis
Label
Photography and September 11th : spectacle, memory, trauma, Jennifer Good, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001459637
Dimensions
24 cm
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xiii, 181 pages
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9781472533319
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2014043583
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0001459637
Label
Photography and September 11th : spectacle, memory, trauma, Jennifer Good, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001459637
Dimensions
24 cm
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xiii, 181 pages
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9781472533319
Isbn Type
(hardback)
Lccn
2014043583
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0001459637

Library Locations

    • Thomas Jefferson LibraryBorrow it
      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
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