Coverart for item
The Resource Progressives, patterns, pedagogy : a corpus-driven approach to English progressive forms, functions, contexts, and didactics, Ute R?omer

Progressives, patterns, pedagogy : a corpus-driven approach to English progressive forms, functions, contexts, and didactics, Ute R?omer

Label
Progressives, patterns, pedagogy : a corpus-driven approach to English progressive forms, functions, contexts, and didactics
Title
Progressives, patterns, pedagogy
Title remainder
a corpus-driven approach to English progressive forms, functions, contexts, and didactics
Statement of responsibility
Ute R?omer
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
This book presents a large-scale corpus-driven study of progressives in 'real' English and 'school' English, combining an analysis of general linguistic interest with a pedagogically motivated one. A systematic comparative analysis of more than 10,000 progressive forms taken from the largest existing corpora of spoken British English and from a small corpus of EFL textbook texts highlights numerous differences between actual language use and textbook language concerning the distribution of progressives, their preferred contexts, favoured functions, and typical lexical-grammatical patterns. On
Member of
Cataloging source
CaPaEBR
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Römer, Ute
Dewey number
425/.62
Index
index present
LC call number
PE1301
LC item number
.R66 2005eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Studies in corpus linguistics,
Series volume
v. 18
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • LANGUAGE ARTS & DISCIPLINES
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
  • English language
  • Great Britain
Label
Progressives, patterns, pedagogy : a corpus-driven approach to English progressive forms, functions, contexts, and didactics, Ute R?omer
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Dedication -- Table of contents -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1.1. Scope and aims of the study -- 1.2. Method of analysis -- 1.3. Structure of the book -- The theoretical basis of the study -- 2.1. Corpus-driven linguistics (CDL) -- 2.1.1. CDL -- a new theory emerging from corpus work -- 2.1.2. Corpus-based vs. corpus-driven approaches -- 2.2. Contextual approaches to the study of language -- 2.2.1. John R. Firth -- 2.2.2. John McH. Sinclair -- 2.3. Pedagogic and didactic grammar -- 2.3.1. Definitions -- 2.3.2. The Mindtian approach -- empirical grammars -- 2.3.3. The present approach -- Progressives in theoretical studies and grammars of English -- 3.1. Problems of definition and terminology -- 3.2. The diachronic dimension: Progressives on the rise -- 3.3. The English progressive in two influential theoretical studies -- 3.3.1. Comrie 1976 -- 3.3.2. Williams 2002 -- 3.4. The progressive in recent linguistic and empirical grammars -- 3.4.1. Quirk, Greenbaum, Leech, Svartvik 1985 -- 3.4.2. Biber, Johansson, Leech, Conrad, Finegan 1999 -- 3.4.3. Mindt 2000 -- 3.4.4. Huddleston, Pullum 2002 -- 3.5. Previous empirical findings on the use of the progressive -- 3.5.1. Frequencies -- 3.5.2. Functions -- 3.5.3. Contexts -- Progressives in spoken British English -- 4.1. Corpus selection -- 4.1.1. Why spoken British native-speaker English (BrNSE)? -- 4.1.2. Availability of spoken British native-speaker English corpora -- 4.1.3. Corpus size and representativeness -- 4.1.4. Corpora used in this study -- 4.2. The empirical method: BNC and BoE data collection, processing, and evaluation -- 4.2.1. Verbs under analysis -- 4.2.2. The collection of corpus data: Query strategies -- 4.2.3. Data filtering -- 4.2.4. Data processing and encoding: The construction of an Access database -- 4.2.5. Data evaluation -- 4.3. The use of progressives in spoken English (I) -- contexts -- 4.3.1. Distribution of different tense forms -- 4.3.2. Tense form contractions -- 4.3.3. Progressives and subjects -- 4.3.4. Progressives and objects -- 4.3.5. Progressives and prepositions -- 4.3.6. Progressives and negation -- 4.3.7. Progressives and other lexical-grammatical phenomena -- 4.3.8. Adverbial specification -- 4.3.9. Summary of the findings [spoken English -- contexts] -- 4.4. The use of progressives in spoken English (II) -- functions -- 4.4.1. Time reference -- 4.4.2. Two central function features: Continuousness and repeatedness -- 4.4.3. One central function or several central functions? -- 4.4.4. Central functions and time reference -- 4.4.5. Additional functions of the progressive -- 4.4.6. Additional functions and time reference -- 4.4.7. Summary of the findings [spoken English -- functions] -- 4.5. Verbs and progressives -- How lexical is grammar? -- 4.5.1. Distribution and restrictions: 100 verbs and 9,468 concordance lines [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.2. Verbs and tense form distributions [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.3. Verbs and subjects [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.4. Verbs and objects [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.5. Verbs and prepositions [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.6. Verbs and negation [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.7. Verbs and other lexical-grammatical phenomena [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.8. Verbs and adverbial specification [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.9. Verbs and time reference [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.10. Verbs and central functions of the progressive [BNC/BoE]
  • 1. Introduction: A need to take stock of progressives -- 2. The theoretical basis of the study: Corpora, contexts, didactics -- 3. Progressives in theoretical studies and grammars of English -- 4. Progressives in spoken British English -- 5. Progressive teaching : Progressives in the German EFL classroom -- 6. Progressives in real spoken English and in "school" English: A -- comparison -- 7. Pedagogical implications: True facts, textbooks, teaching -- 8. Conclusions: Corpus, practice, theory
Control code
84684036
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 327 pages).
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027222893
Lccn
2005050253
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)84684036
Label
Progressives, patterns, pedagogy : a corpus-driven approach to English progressive forms, functions, contexts, and didactics, Ute R?omer
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Cover -- Editorial page -- Title page -- LCC data -- Dedication -- Table of contents -- Acknowledgements -- Introduction -- 1.1. Scope and aims of the study -- 1.2. Method of analysis -- 1.3. Structure of the book -- The theoretical basis of the study -- 2.1. Corpus-driven linguistics (CDL) -- 2.1.1. CDL -- a new theory emerging from corpus work -- 2.1.2. Corpus-based vs. corpus-driven approaches -- 2.2. Contextual approaches to the study of language -- 2.2.1. John R. Firth -- 2.2.2. John McH. Sinclair -- 2.3. Pedagogic and didactic grammar -- 2.3.1. Definitions -- 2.3.2. The Mindtian approach -- empirical grammars -- 2.3.3. The present approach -- Progressives in theoretical studies and grammars of English -- 3.1. Problems of definition and terminology -- 3.2. The diachronic dimension: Progressives on the rise -- 3.3. The English progressive in two influential theoretical studies -- 3.3.1. Comrie 1976 -- 3.3.2. Williams 2002 -- 3.4. The progressive in recent linguistic and empirical grammars -- 3.4.1. Quirk, Greenbaum, Leech, Svartvik 1985 -- 3.4.2. Biber, Johansson, Leech, Conrad, Finegan 1999 -- 3.4.3. Mindt 2000 -- 3.4.4. Huddleston, Pullum 2002 -- 3.5. Previous empirical findings on the use of the progressive -- 3.5.1. Frequencies -- 3.5.2. Functions -- 3.5.3. Contexts -- Progressives in spoken British English -- 4.1. Corpus selection -- 4.1.1. Why spoken British native-speaker English (BrNSE)? -- 4.1.2. Availability of spoken British native-speaker English corpora -- 4.1.3. Corpus size and representativeness -- 4.1.4. Corpora used in this study -- 4.2. The empirical method: BNC and BoE data collection, processing, and evaluation -- 4.2.1. Verbs under analysis -- 4.2.2. The collection of corpus data: Query strategies -- 4.2.3. Data filtering -- 4.2.4. Data processing and encoding: The construction of an Access database -- 4.2.5. Data evaluation -- 4.3. The use of progressives in spoken English (I) -- contexts -- 4.3.1. Distribution of different tense forms -- 4.3.2. Tense form contractions -- 4.3.3. Progressives and subjects -- 4.3.4. Progressives and objects -- 4.3.5. Progressives and prepositions -- 4.3.6. Progressives and negation -- 4.3.7. Progressives and other lexical-grammatical phenomena -- 4.3.8. Adverbial specification -- 4.3.9. Summary of the findings [spoken English -- contexts] -- 4.4. The use of progressives in spoken English (II) -- functions -- 4.4.1. Time reference -- 4.4.2. Two central function features: Continuousness and repeatedness -- 4.4.3. One central function or several central functions? -- 4.4.4. Central functions and time reference -- 4.4.5. Additional functions of the progressive -- 4.4.6. Additional functions and time reference -- 4.4.7. Summary of the findings [spoken English -- functions] -- 4.5. Verbs and progressives -- How lexical is grammar? -- 4.5.1. Distribution and restrictions: 100 verbs and 9,468 concordance lines [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.2. Verbs and tense form distributions [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.3. Verbs and subjects [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.4. Verbs and objects [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.5. Verbs and prepositions [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.6. Verbs and negation [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.7. Verbs and other lexical-grammatical phenomena [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.8. Verbs and adverbial specification [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.9. Verbs and time reference [BNC/BoE] -- 4.5.10. Verbs and central functions of the progressive [BNC/BoE]
  • 1. Introduction: A need to take stock of progressives -- 2. The theoretical basis of the study: Corpora, contexts, didactics -- 3. Progressives in theoretical studies and grammars of English -- 4. Progressives in spoken British English -- 5. Progressive teaching : Progressives in the German EFL classroom -- 6. Progressives in real spoken English and in "school" English: A -- comparison -- 7. Pedagogical implications: True facts, textbooks, teaching -- 8. Conclusions: Corpus, practice, theory
Control code
84684036
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 327 pages).
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789027222893
Lccn
2005050253
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)84684036

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