Coverart for item
The Resource Reparations and victim support in the International Criminal Court, Conor McCarthy

Reparations and victim support in the International Criminal Court, Conor McCarthy

Label
Reparations and victim support in the International Criminal Court
Title
Reparations and victim support in the International Criminal Court
Statement of responsibility
Conor McCarthy
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Explores the ICC's regime of victim redress, including both its reparations regime and the work of the ICC Trust Fund
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
McCarthy, Conor
Dewey number
  • 341.6
  • 341.66
Index
index present
LC call number
KZ7464
LC item number
.M38 2012
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Cambridge studies in international and comparative law
Series volume
88
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • International Criminal Court
  • Reparation (Criminal justice)
  • Victims of crimes
  • Reparation (Criminal justice)
  • International Criminal Court
  • LAW
  • Reparation (Criminal justice)
  • Victims of crimes
  • Herstelbetalingen
  • Slachtoffers
  • Hulpverlening
  • Internationaal strafhof
Label
Reparations and victim support in the International Criminal Court, Conor McCarthy
Instantiates
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages xxi-xl, 361-372) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Introduction. A. Introduction -- B. The book in outline
  • 2. The wider legal framework of victim redress. A. Introduction -- B. The invocation of responsibility -- C. The law relating to the treatment of aliens -- D. International human rights law -- E. International humanitarian law. 1 International armed conflicts; 2 non-international armed conflicts -- F. National law and procedures -- G. Conclusion
  • 3. Victim redress and international criminal justice: an overview. A. Introduction -- B. Individual punishment and the traditional conception of international criminal justice. 1. The position of victims within the classical framework of international law; 2. Victims and the genesis of international criminal law; 3. The conventional position of victims in international criminal law -- C. The development of the Rome Statute's scheme of victim redress -- D.A principled role for victim redress as part of the system of international criminal justice? 1. The conceptual role of victim redress in international criminal law as a form of criminal justice; 2. Victim redress and the prosecution and punishment of individuals: competing or compatible paradigms? -- E. Between ideals and reality: the potential disjuncture between the theory and practice of victim redress -- F. Conclusion
  • 4. The concepts of reparations and victim support under the Rome Statute. A. Introduction -- B. The concept of reparations under the Rome Statute -- C. The concept of victim support under the Rome Statute. 1. The distinction between 'reparations' awarded under Article 75 and victim support provided pursuant to Rule 98(5); 2. The key features of the concept of victim support under the Statute -- D. Conclusion
  • 5. The concept of harm under the Rome Statute. A. Introduction -- B. Prefatory clarification -- C. An Autonomous Concept of harm under the Rome Statute -- D. The forms of recoverable harm under the Rome Statute. 1. Pecuniary loss; 2. Non-pecuniary loss; 3. Communal harm -- E. Conclusion
  • 6. Reparations principles. A. Introduction -- B. The scope and parameters of the Court's power to establish reparations principles -- C. The task of the Court in establishing reparations principles -- D. Determining the scope and extent of damage, loss and injury to victims. 1. Causation; 2. Determining the extent of a perpetrator's liability where a state is concurrently responsible; 3. Reparations awards where a perpetrator lacks the resources necessary to redress the harm he or she is found to have caused -- E. Modalities of reparations under the Rome Statute. 1. Restitution; 2. Compensation; 3. Satisfaction -- F. Conclusion
  • 7. Proceedings and Court orders relevant to reparations. A. Introduction -- B. The relationship between reparations and trial proceedings before the ICC -- C. Proceedings relating to reparations. 1. The role of reparations hearings; 2. The procedure for conducting reparations hearings -- D. Punitive orders. 1. Fines under Article 77(2)(a); 2. Forfeiture of proceeds, property and assets pursuant to Article 77(2)(b) -- E. Reparations orders. 1. Restitution; 2. Compensation; 3. Rehabilitation; 4. Other forms of order -- F. Powers of the Court in cases of contumacy -- G. Protective measures -- H. The burden and standard of proof in reparations and sentencing proceedings. 1. Burden of proof; 2. Standard of proof -- I. Conclusion
  • 8. The provision of reparations and victim support through the Trust Fund. A. Introduction -- B. The organisation and management of the Trust Fund. 1. Relationship with the Assembly of States Parties; 2. The Board of Directors; 3. The Secretariat; 4. The resources of the Trust Fund -- C. The prioritisation of resources by the Trust Fund. 1. Prioritisation of resources by the Trust Fund in respect of Court-ordered reparations; 2. Prioritisation of resources by the Trust Fund in respect of support to victims pursuant to Rule 98(5); 3. Criteria according to which resources for redress may be prioritised -- D. Court-ordered reparations provided 'through' the Trust Fund. 1. The extent of the Court's role in directing and supervising the activities of the Trust Fund; 2. Rule 98(2): The provision of reparations awards to individuals through the Trust Fund; 3. Rule 98(3): The provision of collective reparations awards through the Trust Fund; 4. The determination of claims for reparations by the Trust Fund; 5. Rule 98(4): The implementation of reparations awards by an intergovernmental, international or national organisation -- E. Victim support provided by the Trust Fund pursuant to Rule 98(5). 1. The power of the Trust Fund to use 'other resources' for the benefit of victims; 2. The activities of the Trust Fund undertaken pursuant to Rule 98(5) -- F. Conclusion
  • 9. Victim redress and the Rome Statute's cooperation and enforcement regimes: possibilities and limitations. A. Introduction -- B. The scope of the cooperation regime. 1. The general powers of the Court and the office of the Prosecutor; 2. Reparations proceedings; 3. The work of the Trust Fund in providing victim support -- C. States Parties and the cooperation regime. 1. The scope of the general obligation to cooperate; 2. Particularised forms of assistance the Court may request; 3. Other forms of assistance the Court may request of States Parties -- D Cooperation and third states. 1. Cooperation pursuant to the Statute; 2. Cooperation pursuant to a Security Council resolution -- E. Intergovernmental organisations. 1. The United nations; 2. Other organisations -- F. Cooperation in respect of individuals, armed groups and other non-state entities -- G. The enforcement of fines, punitive forfeiture and reparations orders -- H. Conclusion
  • 10. Conclusions. A. Introduction -- B. The role of victim redress as part of a system of international criminal justice -- C. The distinct role that the Rome Statute's regime for victim redress can play alongside other international regimes -- D. The potential role of the Rome Statute's regime of victim redress alongside national systems and processes -- E. opportunities provided by the Rome Statute as an institutional framework within which to deal with questions of victim redress -- F. Between ideals and reality: challenges confronting the Rome Statute's regime of victim redress. 1. The limited resources available for victim redress; 2. The selectivity of prosecutions under the Rome Statute; 3. The risk of a fragmented and inappropriately individualised response to the harm suffered by victims; 4. Difficulties associated with matters of victim redress being dealt with by an institution at the international level -- G. Conclusion
Control code
794327662
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xliv, 384 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781139012782
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)794327662
Label
Reparations and victim support in the International Criminal Court, Conor McCarthy
Publication
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages xxi-xl, 361-372) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Introduction. A. Introduction -- B. The book in outline
  • 2. The wider legal framework of victim redress. A. Introduction -- B. The invocation of responsibility -- C. The law relating to the treatment of aliens -- D. International human rights law -- E. International humanitarian law. 1 International armed conflicts; 2 non-international armed conflicts -- F. National law and procedures -- G. Conclusion
  • 3. Victim redress and international criminal justice: an overview. A. Introduction -- B. Individual punishment and the traditional conception of international criminal justice. 1. The position of victims within the classical framework of international law; 2. Victims and the genesis of international criminal law; 3. The conventional position of victims in international criminal law -- C. The development of the Rome Statute's scheme of victim redress -- D.A principled role for victim redress as part of the system of international criminal justice? 1. The conceptual role of victim redress in international criminal law as a form of criminal justice; 2. Victim redress and the prosecution and punishment of individuals: competing or compatible paradigms? -- E. Between ideals and reality: the potential disjuncture between the theory and practice of victim redress -- F. Conclusion
  • 4. The concepts of reparations and victim support under the Rome Statute. A. Introduction -- B. The concept of reparations under the Rome Statute -- C. The concept of victim support under the Rome Statute. 1. The distinction between 'reparations' awarded under Article 75 and victim support provided pursuant to Rule 98(5); 2. The key features of the concept of victim support under the Statute -- D. Conclusion
  • 5. The concept of harm under the Rome Statute. A. Introduction -- B. Prefatory clarification -- C. An Autonomous Concept of harm under the Rome Statute -- D. The forms of recoverable harm under the Rome Statute. 1. Pecuniary loss; 2. Non-pecuniary loss; 3. Communal harm -- E. Conclusion
  • 6. Reparations principles. A. Introduction -- B. The scope and parameters of the Court's power to establish reparations principles -- C. The task of the Court in establishing reparations principles -- D. Determining the scope and extent of damage, loss and injury to victims. 1. Causation; 2. Determining the extent of a perpetrator's liability where a state is concurrently responsible; 3. Reparations awards where a perpetrator lacks the resources necessary to redress the harm he or she is found to have caused -- E. Modalities of reparations under the Rome Statute. 1. Restitution; 2. Compensation; 3. Satisfaction -- F. Conclusion
  • 7. Proceedings and Court orders relevant to reparations. A. Introduction -- B. The relationship between reparations and trial proceedings before the ICC -- C. Proceedings relating to reparations. 1. The role of reparations hearings; 2. The procedure for conducting reparations hearings -- D. Punitive orders. 1. Fines under Article 77(2)(a); 2. Forfeiture of proceeds, property and assets pursuant to Article 77(2)(b) -- E. Reparations orders. 1. Restitution; 2. Compensation; 3. Rehabilitation; 4. Other forms of order -- F. Powers of the Court in cases of contumacy -- G. Protective measures -- H. The burden and standard of proof in reparations and sentencing proceedings. 1. Burden of proof; 2. Standard of proof -- I. Conclusion
  • 8. The provision of reparations and victim support through the Trust Fund. A. Introduction -- B. The organisation and management of the Trust Fund. 1. Relationship with the Assembly of States Parties; 2. The Board of Directors; 3. The Secretariat; 4. The resources of the Trust Fund -- C. The prioritisation of resources by the Trust Fund. 1. Prioritisation of resources by the Trust Fund in respect of Court-ordered reparations; 2. Prioritisation of resources by the Trust Fund in respect of support to victims pursuant to Rule 98(5); 3. Criteria according to which resources for redress may be prioritised -- D. Court-ordered reparations provided 'through' the Trust Fund. 1. The extent of the Court's role in directing and supervising the activities of the Trust Fund; 2. Rule 98(2): The provision of reparations awards to individuals through the Trust Fund; 3. Rule 98(3): The provision of collective reparations awards through the Trust Fund; 4. The determination of claims for reparations by the Trust Fund; 5. Rule 98(4): The implementation of reparations awards by an intergovernmental, international or national organisation -- E. Victim support provided by the Trust Fund pursuant to Rule 98(5). 1. The power of the Trust Fund to use 'other resources' for the benefit of victims; 2. The activities of the Trust Fund undertaken pursuant to Rule 98(5) -- F. Conclusion
  • 9. Victim redress and the Rome Statute's cooperation and enforcement regimes: possibilities and limitations. A. Introduction -- B. The scope of the cooperation regime. 1. The general powers of the Court and the office of the Prosecutor; 2. Reparations proceedings; 3. The work of the Trust Fund in providing victim support -- C. States Parties and the cooperation regime. 1. The scope of the general obligation to cooperate; 2. Particularised forms of assistance the Court may request; 3. Other forms of assistance the Court may request of States Parties -- D Cooperation and third states. 1. Cooperation pursuant to the Statute; 2. Cooperation pursuant to a Security Council resolution -- E. Intergovernmental organisations. 1. The United nations; 2. Other organisations -- F. Cooperation in respect of individuals, armed groups and other non-state entities -- G. The enforcement of fines, punitive forfeiture and reparations orders -- H. Conclusion
  • 10. Conclusions. A. Introduction -- B. The role of victim redress as part of a system of international criminal justice -- C. The distinct role that the Rome Statute's regime for victim redress can play alongside other international regimes -- D. The potential role of the Rome Statute's regime of victim redress alongside national systems and processes -- E. opportunities provided by the Rome Statute as an institutional framework within which to deal with questions of victim redress -- F. Between ideals and reality: challenges confronting the Rome Statute's regime of victim redress. 1. The limited resources available for victim redress; 2. The selectivity of prosecutions under the Rome Statute; 3. The risk of a fragmented and inappropriately individualised response to the harm suffered by victims; 4. Difficulties associated with matters of victim redress being dealt with by an institution at the international level -- G. Conclusion
Control code
794327662
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xliv, 384 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9781139012782
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)794327662

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