Coverart for item
The Resource Should we change how we vote? : evaluating Canada's electoral system, edited by Andrew Potter, Daniel Weinstock, and Peter Loewen

Should we change how we vote? : evaluating Canada's electoral system, edited by Andrew Potter, Daniel Weinstock, and Peter Loewen

Label
Should we change how we vote? : evaluating Canada's electoral system
Title
Should we change how we vote?
Title remainder
evaluating Canada's electoral system
Statement of responsibility
edited by Andrew Potter, Daniel Weinstock, and Peter Loewen
Contributor
Editor
Issuing body
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
"During the 2015 federal election, the Liberal Party pledged that, if elected, they would end the "first past the post" electoral system, where whichever candidate receives the most votes wins a riding even if they have not received a majority of all votes cast. After the Liberals assumed power, Minister of Democratic Institutions Maryam Monsef followed up on their campaign promise by announcing a parliamentary committee to evaluate alternative electoral systems and to report their findings before the end of 2016. Challenging the idea that first past the post is obsolete, Should We Change How We Vote? urges Canadians to make sure they understand their electoral system before making drastic changes to it. The contributors to this volume assert that there is perhaps no institution more misunderstood and misrepresented than the Canadian electoral system - it is praised by some for ensuring broad regional representation in Ottawa, but criticized by others for allowing political parties with less than half the popular vote to assume more than half the seats in Parliament. They consider not only how the system works, but also its flaws and its advantages, and whether or not electoral reform is legitimate without a referendum. An essential guide to a crucial debate about the country's future, Should We Change How We Vote? asks if there are alternative reforms that would be easier to implement than a complete overhaul of the electoral system."--
Assigning source
Provided by publisher
Cataloging source
NLC
Dewey number
324.6/30971
Index
no index present
LC call number
JL193
LC item number
.S5 2017
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1963-
  • 1979-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Potter, Andrew
  • Weinstock, Daniel
  • Loewen, Peter John
  • McGill Institute for the Study of Canada
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Canada
  • Voting
  • Elections
  • Proportional representation
  • Representative government and representation
  • Election law
  • Canada
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE
  • Election law
  • Elections
  • Proportional representation
  • Representative government and representation
  • Voting
  • Canada
Label
Should we change how we vote? : evaluating Canada's electoral system, edited by Andrew Potter, Daniel Weinstock, and Peter Loewen
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Published for the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Daniel Weinstock
  • 3.
  • Democratic Stability, Representation, and Accountability: A Case for Single-Member Plurality Elections in Canada
  • Peter Loewen
  • 4.
  • Electoral Reform Is Not a Rights Issue
  • Emmett Macfarlane
  • 5.
  • Imaginary Worlds of Electoral System Reform
  • Christopher Cochrane
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • pt. TWO
  • EVIDENCE AND EXPERIENCE
  • 6.
  • Voter Choice and Accountability: A Case for Caution about Electoral Reform
  • Elizabeth Goodyear-Grant
  • 7.
  • Electoral System Reform: Implications for Internal Party Democracy
  • William Cross
  • 8.
  • Democratic Deliberation and Electoral Reform
  • pt. ONE
  • Colin M. Macleod
  • 9.
  • Can Proportional Representation Lead to Better Political System Performance?
  • Mark E. Warren
  • 10.
  • What Is the Problem that Electoral Reform Will Solve?
  • Lydia Miljan
  • pt. THREE
  • ISSUES AND ALTERNATIVES
  • 11.
  • GUIDING PRINCIPLES
  • Electoral System and Parliament's Diversity Problem: In Defense of the Wrongfully Accused
  • Erin Tolley
  • 12.
  • Indigenous Representation, Self-Determination, and Electoral Reform
  • Melissa S. Williams
  • 13.
  • Addressing Representational Deficits in Canadian Legislatures
  • Elisabeth Gidengil
  • pt. FOUR
  • HOW SHOULD WE DECIDE?
  • 1.
  • 14.
  • Public Consultation on Electoral Reform Through Referenda or Plebiscite: Recent Experience in British Columbia
  • Keith Archer
  • 15.
  • Should We Have a Referendum?
  • Dominique Leydet
  • 16.
  • Modest Case for Constitutional Limits on Electoral Reform in Canada
  • Hoi L. Kong
  • 17.
  • Evaluating How We Vote -- Again
  • Which Procedure for Deciding Election Procedures?
  • Arash Abizadeh
  • Ken Carty
  • 2.
  • Complex Normative Landscape of Electoral Systems
Control code
969538353
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780773550827
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
39eb59c0-d0bb-43da-8269-3983054c642b
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)969538353
Label
Should we change how we vote? : evaluating Canada's electoral system, edited by Andrew Potter, Daniel Weinstock, and Peter Loewen
Publication
Note
Published for the McGill Institute for the Study of Canada
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Daniel Weinstock
  • 3.
  • Democratic Stability, Representation, and Accountability: A Case for Single-Member Plurality Elections in Canada
  • Peter Loewen
  • 4.
  • Electoral Reform Is Not a Rights Issue
  • Emmett Macfarlane
  • 5.
  • Imaginary Worlds of Electoral System Reform
  • Christopher Cochrane
  • Machine generated contents note:
  • pt. TWO
  • EVIDENCE AND EXPERIENCE
  • 6.
  • Voter Choice and Accountability: A Case for Caution about Electoral Reform
  • Elizabeth Goodyear-Grant
  • 7.
  • Electoral System Reform: Implications for Internal Party Democracy
  • William Cross
  • 8.
  • Democratic Deliberation and Electoral Reform
  • pt. ONE
  • Colin M. Macleod
  • 9.
  • Can Proportional Representation Lead to Better Political System Performance?
  • Mark E. Warren
  • 10.
  • What Is the Problem that Electoral Reform Will Solve?
  • Lydia Miljan
  • pt. THREE
  • ISSUES AND ALTERNATIVES
  • 11.
  • GUIDING PRINCIPLES
  • Electoral System and Parliament's Diversity Problem: In Defense of the Wrongfully Accused
  • Erin Tolley
  • 12.
  • Indigenous Representation, Self-Determination, and Electoral Reform
  • Melissa S. Williams
  • 13.
  • Addressing Representational Deficits in Canadian Legislatures
  • Elisabeth Gidengil
  • pt. FOUR
  • HOW SHOULD WE DECIDE?
  • 1.
  • 14.
  • Public Consultation on Electoral Reform Through Referenda or Plebiscite: Recent Experience in British Columbia
  • Keith Archer
  • 15.
  • Should We Have a Referendum?
  • Dominique Leydet
  • 16.
  • Modest Case for Constitutional Limits on Electoral Reform in Canada
  • Hoi L. Kong
  • 17.
  • Evaluating How We Vote -- Again
  • Which Procedure for Deciding Election Procedures?
  • Arash Abizadeh
  • Ken Carty
  • 2.
  • Complex Normative Landscape of Electoral Systems
Control code
969538353
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780773550827
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
http://library.link/vocab/ext/overdrive/overdriveId
39eb59c0-d0bb-43da-8269-3983054c642b
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)969538353

Library Locations

    • Thomas Jefferson LibraryBorrow it
      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
Processing Feedback ...