Coverart for item
The Resource Something of a peasant paradise? : comparing rural societies in Acadie and the Loudunais, 1604-1755, Gregory M.W. Kennedy, (electronic resource)

Something of a peasant paradise? : comparing rural societies in Acadie and the Loudunais, 1604-1755, Gregory M.W. Kennedy, (electronic resource)

Label
Something of a peasant paradise? : comparing rural societies in Acadie and the Loudunais, 1604-1755
Title
Something of a peasant paradise?
Title remainder
comparing rural societies in Acadie and the Loudunais, 1604-1755
Statement of responsibility
Gregory M.W. Kennedy
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Were Acadians better off than their rural counterparts in old regime France? Did they enjoy a Golden Age? To what degree did a distinct Acadian identity emerge before the wars and deportations of the mid-eighteenth century? In Something of a Peasant Paradise?, Gregory Kennedy compares Acadie in North America with a region of western France, the Loudunais, from which a number of the colonists originated. Kennedy considers the natural environment, the role of the state, the economy, the seigneury, and local governance in each place to show that similarities between the two societies have been greatly underestimated or ignored. The Acadian colonists and the people of the Loudunais were frontier peoples, with dispersed settlement patterns based on kin groups, who sought to make the best use of the land and to profit from trade opportunities. Both societies were hierarchical, demonstrated a high degree of political agency, and employed the same institutions of local governance to organize their affairs and negotiate state demands. Neither group was inherently more prosperous, egalitarian, or independent-minded than the other. Rather, the emergence of a distinct Acadian identity can be traced to the gradual adaptation of traditional methods, institutions, and ideas to their new environmental and political situations. A compelling comparative analysis based on archival evidence on both sides of the Atlantic, Something of a Peasant Paradise? challenges the traditional historiography and demonstrates that Acadian society shared many of its characteristics with other French rural societies of the period."--Back cover
  • "Were Acadians better off than their rural counterparts in old regime France? Did they enjoy a Golden Age? To what degree did a distinct Acadian identity emerge before the wars and deportations of the mid-eighteenth century? In Something of a Peasant Paradise?, Gregory Kennedy compares Acadie in North America with a region of western France, the Loudunais, from which a number of the colonists originated. Kennedy considers the natural environment, the role of the state, the economy, the seigneury, and local governance in each place to show that similarities between the two societies have been greatly underestimated or ignored. The Acadian colonists and the people of the Loudunais were frontier peoples, with dispersed settlement patterns based on kin groups, who sought to make the best use of the land and to profit from trade opportunities. Both societies were hierarchical, demonstrated a high degree of political agency, and employed the same institutions of local governance to organize their affairs and negotiate state demands. Neither group was inherently more prosperous, egalitarian, or independent-minded than the other. Rather, the emergence of a distinct Acadian identity can be traced to the gradual adaptation of traditional methods, institutions, and ideas to their new environmental and political situations. A compelling comparative analysis based on archival evidence on both sides of the Atlantic, Something of a Peasant Paradise? challenges the traditional historiography and demonstrates that Acadian society shared many of its characteristics with other French rural societies of the period."--Back cover
  • "Were Acadians better off than their rural counterparts in old regime France? Did they enjoy a Golden Age? To what degree did a distinct Acadian identity emerge before the wars and deportations of the mid-eighteenth century? In Something of a Peasant Paradise?, Gregory Kennedy compares Acadie in North America with a region of western France, the Loudunais, from which a number of the colonists originated. Kennedy considers the natural environment, the role of the state, the economy, the seigneury, and local governance in each place to show that similarities between the two societies have been greatly underestimated or ignored. The Acadian colonists and the people of the Loudunais were frontier peoples, with dispersed settlement patterns based on kin groups, who sought to make the best use of the land and to profit from trade opportunities. Both societies were hierarchical, demonstrated a high degree of political agency, and employed the same institutions of local governance to organize their affairs and negotiate state demands. Neither group was inherently more prosperous, egalitarian, or independent-minded than the other. Rather, the emergence of a distinct Acadian identity can be traced to the gradual adaptation of traditional methods, institutions, and ideas to their new environmental and political situations. A compelling comparative analysis based on archival evidence on both sides of the Atlantic, Something of a Peasant Paradise? challenges the traditional historiography and demonstrates that Acadian society shared many of its characteristics with other French rural societies of the period."--Back cover
Cataloging source
NLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1978-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Kennedy, Gregory M. W.
Dewey number
971.5/017
LC call number
F1038
LC item number
.K46 2014
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Peasants
  • Peasants
  • Acadians
  • Acadia
  • Loudun (France)
  • Paysannerie
  • Paysannerie
  • Acadiens
  • Acadie
  • Loudun (France)
Label
Something of a peasant paradise? : comparing rural societies in Acadie and the Loudunais, 1604-1755, Gregory M.W. Kennedy, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Introduction -- The Natural Environment -- The Political and Military Environment -- The Rural Economy -- The Seigneury -- Institutions of Local Governance -- Conclusion
  • Introduction -- The Natural Environment -- The Political and Military Environment -- The Rural Economy -- The Seigneury -- Institutions of Local Governance -- Conclusion
  • Introduction -- The Natural Environment -- The Political and Military Environment -- The Rural Economy -- The Seigneury -- Institutions of Local Governance -- Conclusion
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001217258
Dimensions
24 cm.
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xiii, 272 pages
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9780773590557
Isbn Type
(epub)
Lccn
2014431042
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0001217258
Label
Something of a peasant paradise? : comparing rural societies in Acadie and the Loudunais, 1604-1755, Gregory M.W. Kennedy, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Contents
  • Introduction -- The Natural Environment -- The Political and Military Environment -- The Rural Economy -- The Seigneury -- Institutions of Local Governance -- Conclusion
  • Introduction -- The Natural Environment -- The Political and Military Environment -- The Rural Economy -- The Seigneury -- Institutions of Local Governance -- Conclusion
  • Introduction -- The Natural Environment -- The Political and Military Environment -- The Rural Economy -- The Seigneury -- Institutions of Local Governance -- Conclusion
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001217258
Dimensions
24 cm.
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xiii, 272 pages
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9780773590557
Isbn Type
(epub)
Lccn
2014431042
Other physical details
illustrations, maps
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0001217258

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