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The Resource Spin control : the White House Office of Communications and the management of presidential news, John Anthony Maltese

Spin control : the White House Office of Communications and the management of presidential news, John Anthony Maltese

Label
Spin control : the White House Office of Communications and the management of presidential news
Title
Spin control
Title remainder
the White House Office of Communications and the management of presidential news
Statement of responsibility
John Anthony Maltese
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • "Determined not to let the press shape the public's view of his presidency, Richard Nixon established the White House Office of Communications soon after his inauguration in 1969. The media's grim portrayals of Vietnam, coupled with Nixon's own personal grievances against the press, led him to charge the new office with the task of controlling the information flow from the executive branch. Although the composition and jurisdiction of this sophisticated public relations agency have fluctuated with each administration, every president since Nixon--Democratic and Republican--has used the Office of Communications to put a favorable "spin" on presidential news. In Spin Control, John Maltese chronicles the development of this powerful White House office and its pivotal role in molding our perception of the modern presidency. The Office of Communications manages the news, ensuring consistency from the executive branch by determining a "line-of-the-day" to be followed by members of the administration, clearing the appearance of public officials on talk shows, and staging presidential appearances to create "photo opportunities" and "sound-bites." Using up-to-the-minute polling data, the office also targets messages to particular constituencies. For instance, it provides local television stations with satellite interviews of administration officials and distributes op-ed columns, press releases, and camera-ready graphics to specialized media markets. In so doing, the office has become an effective vehicle for building presidential power. Maltese concludes that the history of the Office of Communications illustrates how the public side of the presidency has become increasingly stage-managed. Presidents can now subtly orchestrate the symbolic spectacle of politics, set the terms of political debate, and more rapidly adjust their policies to changes in public sentiment. Drawing upon thousands of revealing archival documents and candid interviews with a wide range of White House officials including Gerald Ford, Dick Cheney, Larry Speakes, Ron Ziegler, and Charles Colson, Maltese exposes a distinctly modern form of presidential control."--Jacket
  • "Determined not to let the press shape the public's view of his presidency, Richard Nixon established the White House Office of Communications soon after his inauguration in 1969. The media's grim portrayals of Vietnam, coupled with Nixon's own personal grievances against the press, led him to charge the new office with the task of controlling the information flow from the executive branch. Although the composition and jurisdiction of this sophisticated public relations agency have fluctuated with each administration, every president since Nixon--Democratic and Republican--has used the Office of Communications to put a favorable "spin" on presidential news. In Spin Control, John Maltese chronicles the development of this powerful White House office and its pivotal role in molding our perception of the modern presidency. The Office of Communications manages the news, ensuring consistency from the executive branch by determining a "line-of-the-day" to be followed by members of the administration, clearing the appearance of public officials on talk shows, and staging presidential appearances to create "photo opportunities" and "sound-bites." Using up-to-the-minute polling data, the office also targets messages to particular constituencies. For instance, it provides local television stations with satellite interviews of administration officials and distributes op-ed columns, press releases, and camera-ready graphics to specialized media markets. In so doing, the office has become an effective vehicle for building presidential power. Maltese concludes that the history of the Office of Communications illustrates how the public side of the presidency has become increasingly stage-managed. Presidents can now subtly orchestrate the symbolic spectacle of politics, set the terms of political debate, and more rapidly adjust their policies to changes in public sentiment. Drawing upon thousands of revealing archival documents and candid interviews with a wide range of White House officials including Gerald Ford, Dick Cheney, Larry Speakes, Ron Ziegler, and Charles Colson, Maltese exposes a distinctly modern form of presidential control." -- Jacket
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Maltese, John Anthony
Dewey number
353.03/5
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
JK518
LC item number
.M35 1992
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Presidents
  • Government and the press
Label
Spin control : the White House Office of Communications and the management of presidential news, John Anthony Maltese
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [267]-279) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction -- Origins of the Office of Communications -- The Nixon years : beginnings and evolution -- The Nixon years : a house divided -- The Ford years : decline and resurgence -- The Carter years : getting control -- The Reagan years : perfecting the art of communication -- The Bush years : postscript -- Appendix -- Notes
Control code
24668892
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xi, 297 pages
Isbn
9780807820346
Isbn Type
(cloth : alk. paper)
Lccn
91050788
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(WaOLN)1431762
Label
Spin control : the White House Office of Communications and the management of presidential news, John Anthony Maltese
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [267]-279) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
Introduction -- Origins of the Office of Communications -- The Nixon years : beginnings and evolution -- The Nixon years : a house divided -- The Ford years : decline and resurgence -- The Carter years : getting control -- The Reagan years : perfecting the art of communication -- The Bush years : postscript -- Appendix -- Notes
Control code
24668892
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
xi, 297 pages
Isbn
9780807820346
Isbn Type
(cloth : alk. paper)
Lccn
91050788
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
System control number
(WaOLN)1431762

Library Locations

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      38.710138 -90.311107
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