Coverart for item
The Resource Studies on Early Modern Aristotelianism

Studies on Early Modern Aristotelianism

Label
Studies on Early Modern Aristotelianism
Title
Studies on Early Modern Aristotelianism
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
In Studies in Early Modern Aristotelianism Paul Richard Blum shows the Aristotelian profile of modern philosophy. Philosophy, sciences mathematics, metaphysics and theology under Jesuit leadership mark the difference of subject-centered modernity from 'teachable' school philosophy
Member of
Cataloging source
EBLCP
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Blum, Paul Richard
Dewey number
149.91
Index
index present
LC call number
BX1795.P47 .S58 2012
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
Series statement
Scientific and Learned Cultures and Their Institutions
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Catholic Church and philosophy
  • Catholic learning and scholarship
  • Philosophy, Renaissance
  • Philosophy, Medieval
  • Philosophy, Modern
  • PHILOSOPHY
  • Catholic Church and philosophy
  • Catholic learning and scholarship
  • Philosophy, Medieval
  • Philosophy, Modern
  • Philosophy, Renaissance
  • Aristotelism
  • Jesuiter
Label
Studies on Early Modern Aristotelianism
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Chapter Twelve Rodrigo de Arriaga on Immortality as a Response to Platonism
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • List of Illustrations; Preface; Philosophy at Early Modern Schools; Chapter One Philosophers' Philosophy and School Philosophy; 1.1 Philosophy is as Philosophers Do; 1.2 Individual and Universal in Italian National Philosophy; 1.3 Neo-Scholasticism and Transcendental Truth; 1.4 Jesuit School Philosophy; 1.5 School Philosophy vs. Philosophers' Philosophy; Chapter Two Apostolato dei Collegi: On the Integration of Humanism in the Educational Program of the Jesuits; 2.1 Jacobus Pontanus on the Usefulness of the Humanities; 2.2 Organizing Public Education; 2.3 Studia humanitatis
  • 2.4 Scholastic HumanismChapter Three Philosophy at Early Modern Universities; 3.1 Structure and Heritage of Catholic Universities; 3.2 Teaching Metaphysics at the Jesuit Colleges in Germany in the Seventeenth Century; 3.3 The Ratio studiorum on Philosophy; Chapter Four Péter Pázmány: The Cardinal's Philosophy; 4.1 Pázmány as Professor of Philosophy; 4.2 Manuscripts; 4.3 Some Philosophical Themes; 4.4 The Plan of a Philosophical Textbook; Chapter Five Philosophy in Hungarian: Pál Bertalanffi SJ, Bernard Sartori OFM, and the Scholastic Philosophy of theEighteenth Century; 5.1 János Apáczai Csere
  • 5.2 Pál Bertalanffi SJ5.3 Bernard Sartori OFM; Science From The Renaissance Through The Enlightenment; Chapter Six Jesuits between Religion and Science; 6.1 God in Natural Philosophy; 6.2 Natural Theology; 6.3 Piety and Science; Chapter Seven Principles and Powers: How to Interpret Renaissance Philosophy of Nature Philosophically?; 7.1 Cusanus and Ficino: Reasonable Questions behind Obscure Answers; 7.2 Telesio: Is there any Order in Nature?; 7.3 Cardano: The Unity of Nature and of its Explanation; 7.4 Strategical Uniformity in Creating Theories; 7.5 From Universality to Specialization
  • Chapter Eight The Jesuits and the Janus-Faced History of Natural Sciences8.1 Father Clavius's Complaints: Mathematics in the Jesuit Curriculum; 8.2 The Unity of Human Episteme; 8.3 Experiments with the Philosophy Course: Melchior Cornaeus S.J.; 8.4 The Story of Science; Chapter Nine Benedictus Pererius:Renaissance Culture at the Origins of Jesuit Science; 9.1 Pererius and Averroes; 9.2 Pererius and Renaissance Philosophy; 9.3 The Role of Metaphysics within Philosophy; 9.4 Concessions to Platonism; 9.5 History of Philosophy against the Myth of Ancient Wisdom; 9.6 Against Alchemy and Kabbalah
  • 9.7 Dreams and Clairvoyance9.8 Astrology; Chapter Ten "Ubi natura facit circulos in essendo, nos facimus in cognoscendo." The Demonstrative Regressus and the Beginning of Modern Science in Catholic Scholastics; 10.1 Scholastic and Cartesian Logic; 10.2 Franciscus Toletus; 10.3 French Contexts; 10.4 Franciscans; Chapter Eleven Aristotelianism More Geometrico: Honoré Fabri; 11.1 A Key to Aristotelianism; 11.2 Space: A Universal Concept; 11.3 Excursus on Natural Theology; 11.4 Hypothesis--Founded or Fictitious?; Metaphysics and Theology
Control code
798535802
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (389 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789004232181
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)798535802
Label
Studies on Early Modern Aristotelianism
Publication
Note
Chapter Twelve Rodrigo de Arriaga on Immortality as a Response to Platonism
Antecedent source
unknown
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • List of Illustrations; Preface; Philosophy at Early Modern Schools; Chapter One Philosophers' Philosophy and School Philosophy; 1.1 Philosophy is as Philosophers Do; 1.2 Individual and Universal in Italian National Philosophy; 1.3 Neo-Scholasticism and Transcendental Truth; 1.4 Jesuit School Philosophy; 1.5 School Philosophy vs. Philosophers' Philosophy; Chapter Two Apostolato dei Collegi: On the Integration of Humanism in the Educational Program of the Jesuits; 2.1 Jacobus Pontanus on the Usefulness of the Humanities; 2.2 Organizing Public Education; 2.3 Studia humanitatis
  • 2.4 Scholastic HumanismChapter Three Philosophy at Early Modern Universities; 3.1 Structure and Heritage of Catholic Universities; 3.2 Teaching Metaphysics at the Jesuit Colleges in Germany in the Seventeenth Century; 3.3 The Ratio studiorum on Philosophy; Chapter Four Péter Pázmány: The Cardinal's Philosophy; 4.1 Pázmány as Professor of Philosophy; 4.2 Manuscripts; 4.3 Some Philosophical Themes; 4.4 The Plan of a Philosophical Textbook; Chapter Five Philosophy in Hungarian: Pál Bertalanffi SJ, Bernard Sartori OFM, and the Scholastic Philosophy of theEighteenth Century; 5.1 János Apáczai Csere
  • 5.2 Pál Bertalanffi SJ5.3 Bernard Sartori OFM; Science From The Renaissance Through The Enlightenment; Chapter Six Jesuits between Religion and Science; 6.1 God in Natural Philosophy; 6.2 Natural Theology; 6.3 Piety and Science; Chapter Seven Principles and Powers: How to Interpret Renaissance Philosophy of Nature Philosophically?; 7.1 Cusanus and Ficino: Reasonable Questions behind Obscure Answers; 7.2 Telesio: Is there any Order in Nature?; 7.3 Cardano: The Unity of Nature and of its Explanation; 7.4 Strategical Uniformity in Creating Theories; 7.5 From Universality to Specialization
  • Chapter Eight The Jesuits and the Janus-Faced History of Natural Sciences8.1 Father Clavius's Complaints: Mathematics in the Jesuit Curriculum; 8.2 The Unity of Human Episteme; 8.3 Experiments with the Philosophy Course: Melchior Cornaeus S.J.; 8.4 The Story of Science; Chapter Nine Benedictus Pererius:Renaissance Culture at the Origins of Jesuit Science; 9.1 Pererius and Averroes; 9.2 Pererius and Renaissance Philosophy; 9.3 The Role of Metaphysics within Philosophy; 9.4 Concessions to Platonism; 9.5 History of Philosophy against the Myth of Ancient Wisdom; 9.6 Against Alchemy and Kabbalah
  • 9.7 Dreams and Clairvoyance9.8 Astrology; Chapter Ten "Ubi natura facit circulos in essendo, nos facimus in cognoscendo." The Demonstrative Regressus and the Beginning of Modern Science in Catholic Scholastics; 10.1 Scholastic and Cartesian Logic; 10.2 Franciscus Toletus; 10.3 French Contexts; 10.4 Franciscans; Chapter Eleven Aristotelianism More Geometrico: Honoré Fabri; 11.1 A Key to Aristotelianism; 11.2 Space: A Universal Concept; 11.3 Excursus on Natural Theology; 11.4 Hypothesis--Founded or Fictitious?; Metaphysics and Theology
Control code
798535802
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (389 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789004232181
Level of compression
unknown
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Quality assurance targets
not applicable
Reformatting quality
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)798535802

Library Locations

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      38.710138 -90.311107
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