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The Resource The band played Dixie : race and the liberal conscience at Ole Miss, Nadine Cohodas

The band played Dixie : race and the liberal conscience at Ole Miss, Nadine Cohodas

Label
The band played Dixie : race and the liberal conscience at Ole Miss
Title
The band played Dixie
Title remainder
race and the liberal conscience at Ole Miss
Statement of responsibility
Nadine Cohodas
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • Mississippi, with its rich and dramatic history, holds a special place in the civil rights movement. Perhaps no other institution in that state, or in the South as a whole, has been more of a battleground for race relations or a barometer for progress than the University of Mississippi. Even the school's affectionate nickname - Ole Miss - bespeaks its place in the legacy of the South: now used as short for Old Mississippi, "Ole Miss" was once a term of respect used by
  • Slaves for the wife of a plantation owner. Throughout the first part of this century, the state's "Boll Weevil" legislators presented the most implacable hostility to black enrollment. The campus itself - with its stately white columns and field of Confederate flags at sporting events - seemed almost frozen in time. With the civil rights movement and the arrival of the first black student in 1962, the quietly determined James Meredith, violence and hatred erupted with
  • Regularity on the verdant campus. Even following years of progress, when a young black man and young white woman were elected "Colonel Rebel" and "Miss Ole Miss," the highest campus honors, the pair appeared in the traditional yearbook photograph separated by a picket fence, still suggesting old taboos. Once an unrepentant enclave of educational separatism in the South, the history of Ole Miss has paralleled the nation's own in race relations: the rocky beginnings of
  • Integration following Meredith's admission; the discord of the sixties and seventies, when activist black students eschewed crew cuts and varsity sweaters for Afros and clenched fists; to the delicate reconciliation of recent years. A drastically changed campus today, Ole Miss continues to wrestle with its controversial mascot, "Colonel Rebel," and questions of whether the emotional chords of "Dixie" should still be heard at its football games. The history of Ole Miss
  • Offers a detailed portrait of the uneasy yet cautiously optimistic ways in which American society continues to come to terms with its racial divisions. In The Band Played Dixie, Nadine Cohodas brings to life the people, issues, emotions, disputes, and symbols that transformed Ole Miss into a successfully integrated school, wed in principal to the notion of racial harmony
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Cohodas, Nadine
Dewey number
378.762/83
Illustrations
  • illustrations
  • plates
Index
index present
LC call number
LD3413
LC item number
.C65 1997
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • College integration
  • University of Mississippi
Label
The band played Dixie : race and the liberal conscience at Ole Miss, Nadine Cohodas
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 281-[288]) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
36330873
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
vii, 309 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9780684827216
Lccn
97003685
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
Label
The band played Dixie : race and the liberal conscience at Ole Miss, Nadine Cohodas
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 281-[288]) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Control code
36330873
Dimensions
25 cm
Extent
vii, 309 pages, 16 unnumbered pages of plates
Isbn
9780684827216
Lccn
97003685
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations

Library Locations

    • Thomas Jefferson LibraryBorrow it
      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
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