Coverart for item
The Resource The enormous vogue of things Mexican : cultural relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935, Helen Delpar

The enormous vogue of things Mexican : cultural relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935, Helen Delpar

Label
The enormous vogue of things Mexican : cultural relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935
Title
The enormous vogue of things Mexican
Title remainder
cultural relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935
Statement of responsibility
Helen Delpar
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
The histories of Mexico and the United States have been intertwined since the beginning of their existence as independent nations. Diplomatic relations were established in 1822 and were maintained despite occasional ruptures, and economic links were forged early in the 19th century and became increasingly important with the passage of time. Beginning about 1900 the expanded international role of the United States brought increased attention to the cultures of other peoples, and an important aspect of this international awareness was a growth of interest in Latin America. By 1910, Spanish language classes were offered in American secondary schools, and because of substantial economic investments the American community in Mexico consisted of nearly 21,000 residents. Reviewing two books with Mexican themes in 1929, Waldo Frank saw them as heralds of "a campaign of esthetic, emotional, intellectual infiltration" of the United States by Mexico. Frank was referring to a flowering of cultural relations between the United States and Mexico that began in the 1920s and matured in the mid-1930s. The term "cultural relations" is used here to designate connections, both personal and institutional, that exposed artists and intellectuals in each country to developments in art, music, literature, and archaeology in the other. One result of these relationships was unprecedented exposure to all facets of Mexican culture in the United States, either in original form or as filtered through the consciousness of U.S. interpreters. Delpar describes the development of cultural relations as well as the conditions in both countries that made it possible. These include the early enthusiasm of American liberals and leftists for the Mexican Revolution of 1910, the rise of cultural nationalism in Mexico and the United States, and the admiration of American neoromantics for "authentic" peoples and cultures such as might be found in Mexico. The Enormous Vogue of Things Mexican is the first full-length study of this fascinating chapter in the history of U.S.-Mexican relations. By drawing attention to the cultural link between the neighboring republics at a time of creative ferment in both, it complements studies of diplomatic and economic relations
Action
digitized
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Delpar, Helen
Dewey number
303.48/273072
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
E183.8.M6
LC item number
D45 1992eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • United States
  • Mexico
  • POLITICAL SCIENCE
  • Estados Unidos
  • México
  • International relations
  • Mexico
  • United States
  • Culturele betrekkingen
  • Kulturbeziehungen
  • Mexiko
  • USA
Label
The enormous vogue of things Mexican : cultural relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935, Helen Delpar
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 255-265) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. Political Pilgrims in the "New Mexico": Cultural Relations, 1920-1927 -- 2. The Mexican Vogue at Its Peak: Cultural Relations, 1927-1935 -- 3. Native Americans in the Spotlight -- 4. The Mexican Art Invasion -- 5. Cultural Exchange in Literature, Music, and the Performing Arts
Control code
47009826
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 274 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780817389192
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)47009826
System details
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.
Label
The enormous vogue of things Mexican : cultural relations between the United States and Mexico, 1920-1935, Helen Delpar
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 255-265) and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
multicolored
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. Political Pilgrims in the "New Mexico": Cultural Relations, 1920-1927 -- 2. The Mexican Vogue at Its Peak: Cultural Relations, 1927-1935 -- 3. Native Americans in the Spotlight -- 4. The Mexican Art Invasion -- 5. Cultural Exchange in Literature, Music, and the Performing Arts
Control code
47009826
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
1 online resource (xi, 274 pages)
Form of item
online
Isbn
9780817389192
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations
Reproduction note
Electronic reproduction.
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)47009826
System details
Master and use copy. Digital master created according to Benchmark for Faithful Digital Reproductions of Monographs and Serials, Version 1. Digital Library Federation, December 2002.

Library Locations

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      38.710138 -90.311107
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