Coverart for item
The Resource The holographic anthropic multiverse : formalizing the complex geometry of reality, Richard L. Amoroso, Elizabeth A. Rauscher

The holographic anthropic multiverse : formalizing the complex geometry of reality, Richard L. Amoroso, Elizabeth A. Rauscher

Label
The holographic anthropic multiverse : formalizing the complex geometry of reality
Title
The holographic anthropic multiverse
Title remainder
formalizing the complex geometry of reality
Statement of responsibility
Richard L. Amoroso, Elizabeth A. Rauscher
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Every hundred years or so, a unique groundbreaking Copernican class volume arises unexpectedly. From ashes long thought cold of Einstein's static universe model, for the first time technically viable alternative interpretations to all pillars of Big Bang cosmology are presented in the context of a profound new "continuous-state" cosmological paradigm able to elucidate many contemporary problems plaguing the standard model of particle physics. The cosmology provides an alternative derivation of the string/brane tension formalism derived from large-scale additional dimensions that leads to a putative unique background-independent string vacuum without requiring the Higgs mechanism or SUSY superpartners. Breakthroughs presented, arising from the broad spectrum of explanatory power, include an empirical protocol for violation of the quantum uncertainty principle that provides a viable model for the implementation of universal bulk quantum computing. Other developments naturally arising from utility of the new regime include a design for constructing de Broglie-type matter-wave projectile defense shields with far-reaching consequences
Member of
Cataloging source
LLB
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Amoroso, Richard L
Dewey number
523.1
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
QB991.Q36
LC item number
A46 2009eb
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
  • dictionaries
  • bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Rauscher, Elizabeth A
  • World Scientific (Firm)
Series statement
K & E series on knots and everything
Series volume
v. 43
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Quantum cosmology
  • Anthropic principle
  • Supersymmetry
  • SCIENCE
  • Anthropic principle
  • Quantum cosmology
  • Supersymmetry
Label
The holographic anthropic multiverse : formalizing the complex geometry of reality, Richard L. Amoroso, Elizabeth A. Rauscher
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Demise of the big bang -- a philosophical conundrum. 1.1. Philosophical overview. 1.2. A new cosmological horizon -- 2. Extending the standard model : towards the ultimate evolution of string theory. 2.1. Pre-ambulatory hoopla. 2.2. Ultimate evolution of M-theory. 2.3. String/Brane dynamics. 2.4. New horizons beyond the standard model -- 3. Fundamental parameters for a continuous-state holographic anthropic multiverse. 3.1. Introduction to the cosmological issues. 3.2. Clarification of pertinent cosmological nomenclature. 3.3. Parallel interpretations of cosmological data. 3.4. Euclidean/Minkowski geometry as basis for observed reality. 3.5. Philosophy of space in HAM cosmology -- origin of structure. 3.6. Space : relational versus absolute. 3.7. Physical cosmology of fundamental least cosmological unit. 3.8. Holographic Anthropic Multiverse Cosmology (HAM). 3.9. Overview of the formalism for noetic cosmology. 3.10. Transformation of space into time. 3.11. Energy dependent spacetime metric. 3.12. The Wheeler Geon concept extended to noetic superspace. 3.13. The Hyper-Geon domain of HAM noetic field theory. 3.14. Conclusions -- 4. An alternative derivation of string tension determining a unique background independent string vacuum. 4.1. Introductory prolegomena. 4.2. Scaling in cosmology and the continuous-state postulate. 4.3. Fine tuning implied by astrophysical observation. 4.4. Numerical relations coupled to the concept of scaling. 4.5. Physical cosmology of the close-packed fundamental least unit for an energy dependent spacetime metric. 4.6. The formalism for noetic HAM cosmology. 4.7. Transformation of space into time and string tension. 4.8. Alternative derivation of string tension in HAM cosmology. 4.9. Parameters of the spacetime Incursive Oscillator (IO). 4.10. Emergence of 2-Branes from inherent spacetime oscillations. 4.11. Summary of noetic spacetime parameters. 4.12. Simplistic computer simulated production of the 2-Brane. 4.13. Conclusions -- 5. Formalizing the ultimate geometry of reality : dimensionality, awareness and arrow of time. 5.1. Introduction. 5.2. Current philosophy of temporal science. 5.3. Complementarity of physical time and observer time. 5.4. The vacuum origin of thermodynamics and entropy. 5.5. Peripheral physical properties related to the observer. 5.6. Introduction to spin exchange compactification dynamics and the permutation of dimensions in the noetic transformation. 5.7. Dirac spherical rotation inherent to the transformation of the fundamental least-unit. 5.8. Preparing the noetic spacetime transformation. 5.9. Developing the line element for noetic superspace. 5.10. Formalizing the noetic group of transformations. 5.11. Final remarks -- 6. Integration of gravity & electromagnetism in terms of a Dirac polarized vacuum. 6.1. Introduction to fixing the G/EM framework. 6.2. Flat spacetime and a real physical aether. 6.3. General relativity represented as a polarizable vacuum. 6.4. Maxwell's equations extended. 6.5. Possible new consequences of the model. 6.6. Extending Newton's model with inertia and vacuum drag. 6.7. Relativistic Maxwell's equations in complex form. 6.8. Summation and conclusions -- 7. Redshift/CMBR as intrinsic blackbody cavity-QED absorption/emission equilibrium dynamics. 7.1. Introductory cosmological parameters. 7.2. Origin of redshift in nonzero restmass photon anisotropy in photon propagation and the vigier tired-light hypothesis. 7.3. Weak-field gravitational approach of a finite light-pencil and derivation of the gravitational field of radiation. 7.4. Gravitational action of a light pencil. 7.5. Internal motion structure of the photon. 7.6. Introduction to spin exchange compactification dynamics. 7.7. Blackbody exciplex radiation-cosmological constraints. 7.8. Blackbody microcavity-QED constraints. 7.9. CMBR energy damping by vacuum conductivity. 7.10. Possible black hole considerations for discussion. 7.11. Size temperature relationship of Kerr black holes. 7.12. Temperature relationship of Dirac QED cavity 'black holes'. 7.13. Spin exchange parameters of spacetime-photon coupling. 7.14. Spontaneous CMBR emission by spacetime cavity-QED. 7.15. Possibility of blackbody emission from continuous spacetime compactification. 7.16. New background conditions of the Dirac vacuum. 7.17. Deriving the topological action principle for CMBR emission. 7.18. A putative model of exciplex proton nucleosynthesis. 7.19. Summary and conclusions -- 8. Implications of multidimensional geometries and measurement. 8.1. Introduction. 8.2. Complexified EM fields in local and nonlocal Minkowski space. 8.3. Complex Minkowski space : implications for physics. 8.4. Complex vector and advanced potentials and Bell's inequality. 8.5. Superluminal vector and scalar potential transformation laws. 8.6. Insights into Dirac and Penrose spinor calculus. 8.7. Conclusions -- 9. Probability [symbol]1 : an empirical protocol for surmounting quantum uncertainty. 9.1. Introduction -- philosophy of phenomenology versus ontology. 9.2. The proper cosmological perspective is key. 9.3. Micromagnetics of spacetime conformation. 9.4. Catastrophe theory and the noetic formalism. 9.5. Protocol for experimentally testing noetic cosmology. 9.6. Introduction to the P[symbol]1 experimental design. 9.7. Conclusions -- 10. On the possibility of relativistic shock-wave effects in observations of quasar luminosity. 10.1. The quasar redshift-distance interpretation controversy. 10.2. QSOs an issue of the fundamental basis of geometrodynamics. 10.3. Recent refinements of the Titius-Bode series as an indicator of a possible new gravitational dynamic. 10.4. Critique of Hubble's law as applied to Doppler expansion. 10.5. The observer and the cosmological principle. 10.6. Some fundamental insights on shock waves. 10.7. New cosmological gravitational shock parameters. 10.8. Hypersonic shock waves. 10.9. Gravitational shock waves. 10.10. Conclusions -- 11. The bulk implementation of universal scalable quantum computing. 11.1. Introduction -- basics of quantum computing. 11.2. Overview of new fundamental parameters. 11.3. The causal separation of phenomenology from ontology. 11.4. Review of angular momentum and Pauli-Dirac spin matrices. 11.5. Noumenal reality versus phenomenology of quantum theory. 11.6. Justification for the incursive noetic model. 11.7. Essential properties of complex noetic 12 space. 11.8. Geometric introduction to the noetic QC ontology. 11.9. Microphysical computation limits : case of relativistic qubits. 11.10. Essential parameters of the incursive oscillator. 11.11. Ontological I/O by superceding quantum uncertainty. 11.12. A twistor approach to the UQC I/O ontology. 11.13. Class II mesoionic xanthines as potential 10-qubit quantum computer substrate registers. 11.14. Initialization of mesoionic xanthine registers. 11.15. Conclusions -- 12. Practical matter-wave antiballistic defense shield technologies. 12.1. Introduction -- current status of shield technology. 12.2. Overview of new theoretical and physical requirements. 12.3. Critical philosophical considerations on the limits of potentia. 12.4. The shield vacuum. 12.5. What are the required vacuum parameters? 12.6. Domain wall boundary conditions and emission absorption loci for advanced-retarded waves. 12.7. Energy increase from Ising model lattice-gas properties. 12.8. Programming matter through cellular automata. 12.9. Introduction to de Broglie matter-waves. 12.10. Coherent control of standing matter-waves. 12.11. Afterward. 12.12. Summary of the defense shield design parameters -- 13. Is a differernt search protocol required for success in SETI research? 13.1. On the horns of a dilemma. 13.2. SETI epistemology from the anthropic perspective. 13.3. The Drake equation. 13.4. Brief review of anthropic multiverse parameters. 13.5. Does SETI require a different strategy for success? 13.6
  • Theological arguments -- Adam given his reckoning versus the cosmological age of the earth. 13.7. Seemingly far-out absurd pseudo-scientific arguments. 13.8. The Anthropic Principle (AP). 13.9. Calculations for a holographic anthropic multiverse. 13.10. Wave Function of the Universe (WFU). 13.11. Subtractive interferometry. 13.12. New SETI technology -- the interdimensional Q-telescope. 13.13. Conclusions contusions and cowardice
Control code
613381655
Dimensions
other
Extent
1 online resource (xxii, 485 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789812839312
Lccn
2009017158
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations.
Quality assurance targets
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)613381655
Label
The holographic anthropic multiverse : formalizing the complex geometry of reality, Richard L. Amoroso, Elizabeth A. Rauscher
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references and index
Carrier category
online resource
Carrier category code
  • cr
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Color
black and white
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • 1. Demise of the big bang -- a philosophical conundrum. 1.1. Philosophical overview. 1.2. A new cosmological horizon -- 2. Extending the standard model : towards the ultimate evolution of string theory. 2.1. Pre-ambulatory hoopla. 2.2. Ultimate evolution of M-theory. 2.3. String/Brane dynamics. 2.4. New horizons beyond the standard model -- 3. Fundamental parameters for a continuous-state holographic anthropic multiverse. 3.1. Introduction to the cosmological issues. 3.2. Clarification of pertinent cosmological nomenclature. 3.3. Parallel interpretations of cosmological data. 3.4. Euclidean/Minkowski geometry as basis for observed reality. 3.5. Philosophy of space in HAM cosmology -- origin of structure. 3.6. Space : relational versus absolute. 3.7. Physical cosmology of fundamental least cosmological unit. 3.8. Holographic Anthropic Multiverse Cosmology (HAM). 3.9. Overview of the formalism for noetic cosmology. 3.10. Transformation of space into time. 3.11. Energy dependent spacetime metric. 3.12. The Wheeler Geon concept extended to noetic superspace. 3.13. The Hyper-Geon domain of HAM noetic field theory. 3.14. Conclusions -- 4. An alternative derivation of string tension determining a unique background independent string vacuum. 4.1. Introductory prolegomena. 4.2. Scaling in cosmology and the continuous-state postulate. 4.3. Fine tuning implied by astrophysical observation. 4.4. Numerical relations coupled to the concept of scaling. 4.5. Physical cosmology of the close-packed fundamental least unit for an energy dependent spacetime metric. 4.6. The formalism for noetic HAM cosmology. 4.7. Transformation of space into time and string tension. 4.8. Alternative derivation of string tension in HAM cosmology. 4.9. Parameters of the spacetime Incursive Oscillator (IO). 4.10. Emergence of 2-Branes from inherent spacetime oscillations. 4.11. Summary of noetic spacetime parameters. 4.12. Simplistic computer simulated production of the 2-Brane. 4.13. Conclusions -- 5. Formalizing the ultimate geometry of reality : dimensionality, awareness and arrow of time. 5.1. Introduction. 5.2. Current philosophy of temporal science. 5.3. Complementarity of physical time and observer time. 5.4. The vacuum origin of thermodynamics and entropy. 5.5. Peripheral physical properties related to the observer. 5.6. Introduction to spin exchange compactification dynamics and the permutation of dimensions in the noetic transformation. 5.7. Dirac spherical rotation inherent to the transformation of the fundamental least-unit. 5.8. Preparing the noetic spacetime transformation. 5.9. Developing the line element for noetic superspace. 5.10. Formalizing the noetic group of transformations. 5.11. Final remarks -- 6. Integration of gravity & electromagnetism in terms of a Dirac polarized vacuum. 6.1. Introduction to fixing the G/EM framework. 6.2. Flat spacetime and a real physical aether. 6.3. General relativity represented as a polarizable vacuum. 6.4. Maxwell's equations extended. 6.5. Possible new consequences of the model. 6.6. Extending Newton's model with inertia and vacuum drag. 6.7. Relativistic Maxwell's equations in complex form. 6.8. Summation and conclusions -- 7. Redshift/CMBR as intrinsic blackbody cavity-QED absorption/emission equilibrium dynamics. 7.1. Introductory cosmological parameters. 7.2. Origin of redshift in nonzero restmass photon anisotropy in photon propagation and the vigier tired-light hypothesis. 7.3. Weak-field gravitational approach of a finite light-pencil and derivation of the gravitational field of radiation. 7.4. Gravitational action of a light pencil. 7.5. Internal motion structure of the photon. 7.6. Introduction to spin exchange compactification dynamics. 7.7. Blackbody exciplex radiation-cosmological constraints. 7.8. Blackbody microcavity-QED constraints. 7.9. CMBR energy damping by vacuum conductivity. 7.10. Possible black hole considerations for discussion. 7.11. Size temperature relationship of Kerr black holes. 7.12. Temperature relationship of Dirac QED cavity 'black holes'. 7.13. Spin exchange parameters of spacetime-photon coupling. 7.14. Spontaneous CMBR emission by spacetime cavity-QED. 7.15. Possibility of blackbody emission from continuous spacetime compactification. 7.16. New background conditions of the Dirac vacuum. 7.17. Deriving the topological action principle for CMBR emission. 7.18. A putative model of exciplex proton nucleosynthesis. 7.19. Summary and conclusions -- 8. Implications of multidimensional geometries and measurement. 8.1. Introduction. 8.2. Complexified EM fields in local and nonlocal Minkowski space. 8.3. Complex Minkowski space : implications for physics. 8.4. Complex vector and advanced potentials and Bell's inequality. 8.5. Superluminal vector and scalar potential transformation laws. 8.6. Insights into Dirac and Penrose spinor calculus. 8.7. Conclusions -- 9. Probability [symbol]1 : an empirical protocol for surmounting quantum uncertainty. 9.1. Introduction -- philosophy of phenomenology versus ontology. 9.2. The proper cosmological perspective is key. 9.3. Micromagnetics of spacetime conformation. 9.4. Catastrophe theory and the noetic formalism. 9.5. Protocol for experimentally testing noetic cosmology. 9.6. Introduction to the P[symbol]1 experimental design. 9.7. Conclusions -- 10. On the possibility of relativistic shock-wave effects in observations of quasar luminosity. 10.1. The quasar redshift-distance interpretation controversy. 10.2. QSOs an issue of the fundamental basis of geometrodynamics. 10.3. Recent refinements of the Titius-Bode series as an indicator of a possible new gravitational dynamic. 10.4. Critique of Hubble's law as applied to Doppler expansion. 10.5. The observer and the cosmological principle. 10.6. Some fundamental insights on shock waves. 10.7. New cosmological gravitational shock parameters. 10.8. Hypersonic shock waves. 10.9. Gravitational shock waves. 10.10. Conclusions -- 11. The bulk implementation of universal scalable quantum computing. 11.1. Introduction -- basics of quantum computing. 11.2. Overview of new fundamental parameters. 11.3. The causal separation of phenomenology from ontology. 11.4. Review of angular momentum and Pauli-Dirac spin matrices. 11.5. Noumenal reality versus phenomenology of quantum theory. 11.6. Justification for the incursive noetic model. 11.7. Essential properties of complex noetic 12 space. 11.8. Geometric introduction to the noetic QC ontology. 11.9. Microphysical computation limits : case of relativistic qubits. 11.10. Essential parameters of the incursive oscillator. 11.11. Ontological I/O by superceding quantum uncertainty. 11.12. A twistor approach to the UQC I/O ontology. 11.13. Class II mesoionic xanthines as potential 10-qubit quantum computer substrate registers. 11.14. Initialization of mesoionic xanthine registers. 11.15. Conclusions -- 12. Practical matter-wave antiballistic defense shield technologies. 12.1. Introduction -- current status of shield technology. 12.2. Overview of new theoretical and physical requirements. 12.3. Critical philosophical considerations on the limits of potentia. 12.4. The shield vacuum. 12.5. What are the required vacuum parameters? 12.6. Domain wall boundary conditions and emission absorption loci for advanced-retarded waves. 12.7. Energy increase from Ising model lattice-gas properties. 12.8. Programming matter through cellular automata. 12.9. Introduction to de Broglie matter-waves. 12.10. Coherent control of standing matter-waves. 12.11. Afterward. 12.12. Summary of the defense shield design parameters -- 13. Is a differernt search protocol required for success in SETI research? 13.1. On the horns of a dilemma. 13.2. SETI epistemology from the anthropic perspective. 13.3. The Drake equation. 13.4. Brief review of anthropic multiverse parameters. 13.5. Does SETI require a different strategy for success? 13.6
  • Theological arguments -- Adam given his reckoning versus the cosmological age of the earth. 13.7. Seemingly far-out absurd pseudo-scientific arguments. 13.8. The Anthropic Principle (AP). 13.9. Calculations for a holographic anthropic multiverse. 13.10. Wave Function of the Universe (WFU). 13.11. Subtractive interferometry. 13.12. New SETI technology -- the interdimensional Q-telescope. 13.13. Conclusions contusions and cowardice
Control code
613381655
Dimensions
other
Extent
1 online resource (xxii, 485 pages)
File format
unknown
Form of item
online
Isbn
9789812839312
Lccn
2009017158
Media category
computer
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • c
Other physical details
illustrations.
Quality assurance targets
unknown
Sound
unknown sound
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(OCoLC)613381655

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