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The Resource The messenger reader : stories, poetry, and essays from The messenger magazine, Sondra Kathryn Wilson, editor

The messenger reader : stories, poetry, and essays from The messenger magazine, Sondra Kathryn Wilson, editor

Label
The messenger reader : stories, poetry, and essays from The messenger magazine
Title
The messenger reader
Title remainder
stories, poetry, and essays from The messenger magazine
Statement of responsibility
Sondra Kathryn Wilson, editor
Contributor
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
  • "The Messenger was the third most popular magazine of the Harlem Renaissance, after The Crisis and Opportunity. Unlike the other two, though, The Messenger was not tied to a civil rights organization. Labor activist A. Philip Randolph and economist Chandler Owen started the magazine in 1917 to advance to the black masses the cause of socialism. They believed that a socialist society was the only one that would be free from racism and "the cheap, peanut politics of the old reactionary Negro leaders."" "The socialist ideology of The Messenger, "the only magazine of scientific radicalism in the world published by Negroes," was reflected in the works published in its pages. The Messenger Reader contains poetry, stories, and essays from, among others, Paul Robeson, Zora Neale Hurston, J.A. Rogers, Eric Walrond, and Dorothy West. Most of this material has never been published outside of the magazine. The Messenger Reader is a welcome addition to the history of black literature and thought."--Jacket
  • "The Messenger was the third most popular magazine of the Harlem Renaissance, after The Crisis and Opportunity. Unlike the other two, though, The Messenger was not tied to a civil rights organization. Labor activist A. Philip Randolph and economist Chandler Owen started the magazine in 1917 to advance to the black masses the cause of socialism. They believed that a socialist society was the only one that would be free from racism and "the cheap, peanut politics of the old reactionary Negro leaders."" "The socialist ideology of The Messenger, "the only magazine of scientific radicalism in the world published by Negroes," was reflected in the works published in its pages. The Messenger Reader contains poetry, stories, and essays from, among others, Paul Robeson, Zora Neale Hurston, J. A. Rogers, Eric Walrond, and Dorothy West. Most of this material has never been published outside of the magazine. The Messenger Reader is a welcome addition to the history of black literature and thought."--BOOK JACKET
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://bibfra.me/vocab/lite/collectionName
Messenger (New York, N.Y.)
Dewey number
810.8/0896073/09041
Index
no index present
LC call number
PS508.N3
LC item number
M47 2000
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
Wilson, Sondra K
Series statement
Modern Library Harlem renaissance
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • American literature
  • African Americans
  • American literature
  • American literature
  • Harlem Renaissance
  • African Americans
Label
The messenger reader : stories, poetry, and essays from The messenger magazine, Sondra Kathryn Wilson, editor
Instantiates
Publication
Note
"Modern Library paperback original"--T.p. verso
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [417]-418)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Her thirteen black soldiers
  • Archibald H. Grimke
  • Too much religion
  • The bursting of the chrysalis
  • Here and hereafter
  • Love's unchangeableness
  • The voice of the wilderness
  • Credo
  • Where air of freedom is
  • Walter Everette Hawkins
  • Poetry.
  • Ruthlessville
  • The song of psyche
  • The song
  • Dreams are the workman's friends
  • My motive
  • Countee Cullen
  • Sphinxes
  • That poison, late sleep
  • Thomas Millard Henry
  • Grant Park
  • Song
  • Gods
  • Prayer for a winter night
  • Minnie sings her blues
  • Formula
  • Poem for youth
  • The naughty child
  • Desire
  • Langston Hughes
  • To love
  • Africa
  • Woodnote
  • Your voice keeps ringing down the day
  • Paradox
  • Romance
  • Promise
  • Toy
  • Prejudice
  • Crucifixion
  • Appassionata
  • Disenthralment
  • Loss
  • Arna Bontemps
  • Karma
  • Georgia Douglas Johnson
  • Fiat Lux
  • Love in Midsummer
  • Helene Johnson
  • Variations on a black theme
  • S. Miller Johnson
  • If we must die
  • Labor's day
  • Birds of prey
  • Pagan prayer
  • Claude McKay
  • Query
  • R. Bruce Nugent
  • Up, sons of freedom!
  • William Pickens
  • Confession
  • Wallace Thurman
  • Countee P. Cullen
  • To Miss Harriet E. Riggs
  • Angelina W. Grimke
  • Langston Hughes
  • The Eatonville anthology
  • Zora Neale Hurston
  • Seven years for Rachel
  • A deserter from Armageddon
  • Brief biography of Fletcher J. Mosely
  • The bird in the bush
  • Theophilus Lewis
  • The golden penknife
  • S. Miller Johnson
  • Fiction and plays.
  • The spring of '65
  • William Moore
  • Snakes
  • Eric D. Walrond
  • Hannah Byde
  • Dorothy West
  • The yellow peril : A one-act play
  • At the coffee house
  • George S. Schuyler
  • The unquenchable fire
  • Robert W. Bagnall
  • Silk stockings
  • Anita Scott Coleman
  • The young glory of him
  • Bodies in the moonlight
  • The little virgin
  • Harlem shadows
  • Georgia Douglas Johnson
  • Chords and dischords
  • Countee Cullen
  • Certain people of importance
  • Nella Larsen Imes
  • Fire in the flint
  • Robert Bagnall
  • A stranger at the gates : A review of Nigger heaven
  • A thrush at eve with an atavistic wound
  • Book and theater reviews.
  • Black harvest
  • Wallace Thurman
  • The weary blues
  • Porgy
  • All God's chillun' still got wings
  • Reflections of an alleged dramatic critic
  • My red rag
  • Theophilus Lewis
  • Shoddyism called history
  • Phases of Du Bois
  • William N. Colson
  • The brass check : a review
  • W.A. Domingo
  • The book of American Negro poetry
  • Floyd J. Calvin
  • Thomas Millard Henry
  • Propaganda in the theatre
  • Willis Richardson
  • Same old blues
  • Theophilus Lewis
  • An actor's wanderings and hopes
  • Paul Robeson
  • The Black and Tan Cabaret : America's most democratic institution
  • Chandler Owen
  • Survey of Negro literature, 1760-1926
  • Essays.
  • Thomas L.G. Oxley
  • Who is the new Negro, and why?
  • J.A. Rogers
  • The failure of Negro leadership
  • Du Bois on revolution
  • A voice from the dead!
  • Black mammies
  • Chandler Owen
  • Socialism the Negroes' hope
  • "If we must die"
  • Colored authors and their contributions to the world's literature
  • W.A. Domingo
  • The Negro in politics
  • Reply to Marcus Garvey
  • A. Philip Randolph
  • The West Indies : Their political, social, and economic condition
  • J.A. Rogers
  • Economics and politics
  • George S. Schuyler
  • The business side of a university
  • Emmett J. Scott
  • Irene M. Gaines
  • The hue and cry about Howard University
  • Zora Neale Hurston
  • In the name of purity
  • Quoth Brigham Young : This is the place
  • Wallace Thurman
  • Woman's most serious problem
  • Alice Dunbar-Nelson
  • The black city
  • Eric D. Walrond
  • Art and propaganda
  • William Pickens
  • Old school of Negro "Critics" hard on Paul Laurence Dunbar
Control code
42009349
Dimensions
21 cm
Extent
xxv, 418 pages
Isbn
9780375755392
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
99039882
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)42009349
Label
The messenger reader : stories, poetry, and essays from The messenger magazine, Sondra Kathryn Wilson, editor
Publication
Note
"Modern Library paperback original"--T.p. verso
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages [417]-418)
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • Her thirteen black soldiers
  • Archibald H. Grimke
  • Too much religion
  • The bursting of the chrysalis
  • Here and hereafter
  • Love's unchangeableness
  • The voice of the wilderness
  • Credo
  • Where air of freedom is
  • Walter Everette Hawkins
  • Poetry.
  • Ruthlessville
  • The song of psyche
  • The song
  • Dreams are the workman's friends
  • My motive
  • Countee Cullen
  • Sphinxes
  • That poison, late sleep
  • Thomas Millard Henry
  • Grant Park
  • Song
  • Gods
  • Prayer for a winter night
  • Minnie sings her blues
  • Formula
  • Poem for youth
  • The naughty child
  • Desire
  • Langston Hughes
  • To love
  • Africa
  • Woodnote
  • Your voice keeps ringing down the day
  • Paradox
  • Romance
  • Promise
  • Toy
  • Prejudice
  • Crucifixion
  • Appassionata
  • Disenthralment
  • Loss
  • Arna Bontemps
  • Karma
  • Georgia Douglas Johnson
  • Fiat Lux
  • Love in Midsummer
  • Helene Johnson
  • Variations on a black theme
  • S. Miller Johnson
  • If we must die
  • Labor's day
  • Birds of prey
  • Pagan prayer
  • Claude McKay
  • Query
  • R. Bruce Nugent
  • Up, sons of freedom!
  • William Pickens
  • Confession
  • Wallace Thurman
  • Countee P. Cullen
  • To Miss Harriet E. Riggs
  • Angelina W. Grimke
  • Langston Hughes
  • The Eatonville anthology
  • Zora Neale Hurston
  • Seven years for Rachel
  • A deserter from Armageddon
  • Brief biography of Fletcher J. Mosely
  • The bird in the bush
  • Theophilus Lewis
  • The golden penknife
  • S. Miller Johnson
  • Fiction and plays.
  • The spring of '65
  • William Moore
  • Snakes
  • Eric D. Walrond
  • Hannah Byde
  • Dorothy West
  • The yellow peril : A one-act play
  • At the coffee house
  • George S. Schuyler
  • The unquenchable fire
  • Robert W. Bagnall
  • Silk stockings
  • Anita Scott Coleman
  • The young glory of him
  • Bodies in the moonlight
  • The little virgin
  • Harlem shadows
  • Georgia Douglas Johnson
  • Chords and dischords
  • Countee Cullen
  • Certain people of importance
  • Nella Larsen Imes
  • Fire in the flint
  • Robert Bagnall
  • A stranger at the gates : A review of Nigger heaven
  • A thrush at eve with an atavistic wound
  • Book and theater reviews.
  • Black harvest
  • Wallace Thurman
  • The weary blues
  • Porgy
  • All God's chillun' still got wings
  • Reflections of an alleged dramatic critic
  • My red rag
  • Theophilus Lewis
  • Shoddyism called history
  • Phases of Du Bois
  • William N. Colson
  • The brass check : a review
  • W.A. Domingo
  • The book of American Negro poetry
  • Floyd J. Calvin
  • Thomas Millard Henry
  • Propaganda in the theatre
  • Willis Richardson
  • Same old blues
  • Theophilus Lewis
  • An actor's wanderings and hopes
  • Paul Robeson
  • The Black and Tan Cabaret : America's most democratic institution
  • Chandler Owen
  • Survey of Negro literature, 1760-1926
  • Essays.
  • Thomas L.G. Oxley
  • Who is the new Negro, and why?
  • J.A. Rogers
  • The failure of Negro leadership
  • Du Bois on revolution
  • A voice from the dead!
  • Black mammies
  • Chandler Owen
  • Socialism the Negroes' hope
  • "If we must die"
  • Colored authors and their contributions to the world's literature
  • W.A. Domingo
  • The Negro in politics
  • Reply to Marcus Garvey
  • A. Philip Randolph
  • The West Indies : Their political, social, and economic condition
  • J.A. Rogers
  • Economics and politics
  • George S. Schuyler
  • The business side of a university
  • Emmett J. Scott
  • Irene M. Gaines
  • The hue and cry about Howard University
  • Zora Neale Hurston
  • In the name of purity
  • Quoth Brigham Young : This is the place
  • Wallace Thurman
  • Woman's most serious problem
  • Alice Dunbar-Nelson
  • The black city
  • Eric D. Walrond
  • Art and propaganda
  • William Pickens
  • Old school of Negro "Critics" hard on Paul Laurence Dunbar
Control code
42009349
Dimensions
21 cm
Extent
xxv, 418 pages
Isbn
9780375755392
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
99039882
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
System control number
(OCoLC)42009349

Library Locations

    • Thomas Jefferson LibraryBorrow it
      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
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