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The Resource The myth of Apollo and Marsyas in the art of the Italian Renaissance : an inquiry into the meaning of images, Edith Wyss

The myth of Apollo and Marsyas in the art of the Italian Renaissance : an inquiry into the meaning of images, Edith Wyss

Label
The myth of Apollo and Marsyas in the art of the Italian Renaissance : an inquiry into the meaning of images
Title
The myth of Apollo and Marsyas in the art of the Italian Renaissance
Title remainder
an inquiry into the meaning of images
Statement of responsibility
Edith Wyss
Creator
Subject
Genre
Language
eng
Summary
Titian's great late painting of Apollo and Marsyas has been included in several recent exhibitions of Venetian painting in Europe and the United States. In this study, art historian Edith Wyss sheds light on the perception of the theme in the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries. Renaissance artists knew several outstanding antique sculptures representing the myth and drew often on these prestigious models for inspiration. Only from the third decade of the sixteenth century onward did autonomous artistic interpretations of the myth assert themselves. Among the artists who devoted their skills to this myth are Perugino, Raphael, and several of his followers - Giulio Romano, Parmigianino, Bronzino, Salviati, Tintoretto, and Titian. Wyss demonstrates that some depictions encode messages that transcend the obvious exhortation against pride. Taking their cue from a popular edition of the Metamorphoses, some patrons and artists viewed the myth as an allegory of the revelation of truth. Others, following Pythagorean teachings, perceived the sun god's lyre music as the music of the spheres. In this perception, Apollo's victory assures the continued harmonious functioning of the universe, and Marsyas's defiance of the sun god's authority called for the severest retribution. In a few instances the author demonstrates that the Pythagorean allegorical reading of the myth was borrowed for political ends, with Apollo's victorious lyre standing as metaphor for the supposedly harmonious government of the ruling power. The discussion allows the Marsyas myth to unfold in a theme of extraordinary richness and depth and touches on issues that were at the core of the Renaissance culture
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorDate
1936-
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Wyss, Edith
Dewey number
704.9/48913/094509024
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
N7763.M35
LC item number
W97 1996
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Apollo
  • Marsyas (Greek deity)
  • Art, Italian
  • Art, Renaissance
  • Apollo (god)
  • Marsyas
  • Mythen
  • Beeldende kunsten
  • Iconografie
  • Marsyas (Divinité grecque)
  • Apollon (Divinité grecque)
  • Art italien
  • Art de la Renaissance
  • Kunst
  • Italien
Label
The myth of Apollo and Marsyas in the art of the Italian Renaissance : an inquiry into the meaning of images, Edith Wyss
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 168-177) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. The Marsyas Myth and Its Representations in Antiquity -- 2. The Ancient Symbolism of the Myth -- 3. The Survival of the Myth and Its Meaning from Late Antiquity to the Renaissance -- 4. The Augustan Intaglio Gem: Copies, Variants, Inspirations -- 5. The Influence of Classical Marsyas Sculptures -- 6. Marsyas Scenes from a Roman Ceiling Borrowed for Renaissance Palace Decorations -- 7. The Woodcut Illustration of the Ovidio vulgare of 1497 and Its Influence -- 8. Iconographic Inventions of the Second Quarter of the Cinquecento -- 9. Venetian Depictions of the Myth from Mid Century -- 10. The Marsyas Myth in the Era of the Counter-Reformation -- 11. Titian's Flaying of Marsyas -- Appendix: List of the Italian Representations of the Marsyas Myth c. 1460-1575
Control code
31435915
Dimensions
31 cm
Extent
182 pages
Isbn
9780874135404
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
94023887
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
System control number
(OCoLC)31435915
Label
The myth of Apollo and Marsyas in the art of the Italian Renaissance : an inquiry into the meaning of images, Edith Wyss
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 168-177) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
1. The Marsyas Myth and Its Representations in Antiquity -- 2. The Ancient Symbolism of the Myth -- 3. The Survival of the Myth and Its Meaning from Late Antiquity to the Renaissance -- 4. The Augustan Intaglio Gem: Copies, Variants, Inspirations -- 5. The Influence of Classical Marsyas Sculptures -- 6. Marsyas Scenes from a Roman Ceiling Borrowed for Renaissance Palace Decorations -- 7. The Woodcut Illustration of the Ovidio vulgare of 1497 and Its Influence -- 8. Iconographic Inventions of the Second Quarter of the Cinquecento -- 9. Venetian Depictions of the Myth from Mid Century -- 10. The Marsyas Myth in the Era of the Counter-Reformation -- 11. Titian's Flaying of Marsyas -- Appendix: List of the Italian Representations of the Marsyas Myth c. 1460-1575
Control code
31435915
Dimensions
31 cm
Extent
182 pages
Isbn
9780874135404
Isbn Type
(alk. paper)
Lccn
94023887
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
n
Other physical details
illustrations (some color)
System control number
(OCoLC)31435915

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