Coverart for item
The Resource Toxicity-pathway-based risk assessment : preparing for paradigm change : a symposium summary, Ellen Mantus, rapporteur ; Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Division on Earth and Life Studies, National Research Council of the National Academies, (electronic resource)

Toxicity-pathway-based risk assessment : preparing for paradigm change : a symposium summary, Ellen Mantus, rapporteur ; Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Division on Earth and Life Studies, National Research Council of the National Academies, (electronic resource)

Label
Toxicity-pathway-based risk assessment : preparing for paradigm change : a symposium summary
Title
Toxicity-pathway-based risk assessment
Title remainder
preparing for paradigm change : a symposium summary
Statement of responsibility
Ellen Mantus, rapporteur ; Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Division on Earth and Life Studies, National Research Council of the National Academies
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • In 2007, the National Research Council envisioned a new paradigm in which biologically important perturbations in key toxicity pathways would be evaluated with new methods in molecular biology, bioinformatics, computational toxicology, and a comprehensive array of in vitro tests based primarily on human biology. Although some considered the vision too optimistic with respect to the promise of the new science, no one can deny that a revolution in toxicity testing is under way. New approaches are being developed, and data are being generated. As a result, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) expects a large influx of data that will need to be evaluated. EPA also is faced with tens of thousands of chemicals on which toxicity information is incomplete and emerging chemicals and substances that will need risk assessment and possible regulation. Therefore, the agency asked the National Research Council to convene a symposium to stimulate discussion on the application of the new approaches and data in risk assessment. The symposium was held on May 11-13, 2009, in Washington, DC, and included presentations and discussion sessions on pathway-based approaches for hazard identification, applications of new approaches to mode-of-action analyses, the challenges to and opportunities for risk assessment in the changing paradigm, and future directions
  • In 2007, the National Research Council envisioned a new paradigm in which biologically important perturbations in key toxicity pathways would be evaluated with new methods in molecular biology, bioinformatics, computational toxicology, and a comprehensive array of in vitro tests based primarily on human biology. Although some considered the vision too optimistic with respect to the promise of the new science, no one can deny that a revolution in toxicity testing is under way. New approaches are being developed, and data are being generated. As a result, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) expects a large influx of data that will need to be evaluated. EPA also is faced with tens of thousands of chemicals on which toxicity information is incomplete and emerging chemicals and substances that will need risk assessment and possible regulation. Therefore, the agency asked the National Research Council to convene a symposium to stimulate discussion on the application of the new approaches and data in risk assessment. The symposium was held on May 11-13, 2009, in Washington, DC, and included presentations and discussion sessions on pathway-based approaches for hazard identification, applications of new approaches to mode-of-action analyses, the challenges to and opportunities for risk assessment in the changing paradigm, and future directions
  • In 2007, the National Research Council envisioned a new paradigm in which biologically important perturbations in key toxicity pathways would be evaluated with new methods in molecular biology, bioinformatics, computational toxicology, and a comprehensive array of in vitro tests based primarily on human biology. Although some considered the vision too optimistic with respect to the promise of the new science, no one can deny that a revolution in toxicity testing is under way. New approaches are being developed, and data are being generated. As a result, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) expects a large influx of data that will need to be evaluated. EPA also is faced with tens of thousands of chemicals on which toxicity information is incomplete and emerging chemicals and substances that will need risk assessment and possible regulation. Therefore, the agency asked the National Research Council to convene a symposium to stimulate discussion on the application of the new approaches and data in risk assessment. The symposium was held on May 11-13, 2009, in Washington, DC, and included presentations and discussion sessions on pathway-based approaches for hazard identification, applications of new approaches to mode-of-action analyses, the challenges to and opportunities for risk assessment in the changing paradigm, and future directions
  • In 2007, the National Research Council envisioned a new paradigm in which biologically important perturbations in key toxicity pathways would be evaluated with new methods in molecular biology, bioinformatics, computational toxicology, and a comprehensive array of in vitro tests based primarily on human biology. Although some considered the vision too optimistic with respect to the promise of the new science, no one can deny that a revolution in toxicity testing is under way. New approaches are being developed, and data are being generated. As a result, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) expects a large influx of data that will need to be evaluated. EPA also is faced with tens of thousands of chemicals on which toxicity information is incomplete and emerging chemicals and substances that will need risk assessment and possible regulation. Therefore, the agency asked the National Research Council to convene a symposium to stimulate discussion on the application of the new approaches and data in risk assessment. The symposium was held on May 11-13, 2009, in Washington, DC, and included presentations and discussion sessions on pathway-based approaches for hazard identification, applications of new approaches to mode-of-action analyses, the challenges to and opportunities for risk assessment in the changing paradigm, and future directions
  • In 2007, the National Research Council envisioned a new paradigm in which biologically important perturbations in key toxicity pathways would be evaluated with new methods in molecular biology, bioinformatics, computational toxicology, and a comprehensive array of in vitro tests based primarily on human biology. Although some considered the vision too optimistic with respect to the promise of the new science, no one can deny that a revolution in toxicity testing is under way. New approaches are being developed, and data are being generated. As a result, the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) expects a large influx of data that will need to be evaluated. EPA also is faced with tens of thousands of chemicals on which toxicity information is incomplete and emerging chemicals and substances that will need risk assessment and possible regulation. Therefore, the agency asked the National Research Council to convene a symposium to stimulate discussion on the application of the new approaches and data in risk assessment. The symposium was held on May 11-13, 2009, in Washington, DC, and included presentations and discussion sessions on pathway-based approaches for hazard identification, applications of new approaches to mode-of-action analyses, the challenges to and opportunities for risk assessment in the changing paradigm, and future directions
Cataloging source
N$T
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Mantus, Ellen K
Funding information
This project was supported by Contract No. EP-C-06-057 between the National Academy of Sciences and the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Any opinions, findings, conclusions, or recommendations expressed in this publication are those of the author(s) and do not necessarily reflect the view of the organizations or agencies that provided support for this project.
NLM call number
QV 602
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
National Research Council (U.S.)
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Toxicity Tests
  • Risk Assessment
Label
Toxicity-pathway-based risk assessment : preparing for paradigm change : a symposium summary, Ellen Mantus, rapporteur ; Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Division on Earth and Life Studies, National Research Council of the National Academies, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Note
Title from PDF title page
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Control code
OCM1bookssj0000429919
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9780309154222
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0000429919
Label
Toxicity-pathway-based risk assessment : preparing for paradigm change : a symposium summary, Ellen Mantus, rapporteur ; Standing Committee on Risk Analysis Issues and Reviews, Board on Environmental Studies and Toxicology, Division on Earth and Life Studies, National Research Council of the National Academies, (electronic resource)
Publication
Note
Title from PDF title page
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references
Control code
OCM1bookssj0000429919
Dimensions
unknown
Isbn
9780309154222
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)bookssj0000429919

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