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The Resource Why we read fiction : theory of mind and the novel, Lisa Zunshine

Why we read fiction : theory of mind and the novel, Lisa Zunshine

Label
Why we read fiction : theory of mind and the novel
Title
Why we read fiction
Title remainder
theory of mind and the novel
Statement of responsibility
Lisa Zunshine
Creator
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
Why We Read Fiction offers a lucid overview of the most exciting area of research in contemporary cognitive psychology known as "Theory of Mind" and discusses its implications for literary studies. It covers a broad range of fictional narratives, from Richardson s Clarissa, Dostoyevski's Crime and Punishment, and Austen s Pride and Prejudice to Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Nabokov's Lolita, and Hammett s The Maltese Falcon. Zunshine's surprising new interpretations of well-known literary texts and popular cultural representations constantly prod her readers to rethink their own interest in fictional narrative. Written for a general audience, this study provides a jargon-free introduction to the rapidly growing interdisciplinary field known as cognitive approaches to literature and culture
Member of
Cataloging source
DLC
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Zunshine, Lisa
Dewey number
809.3
Government publication
government publication of a state province territory dependency etc
Illustrations
illustrations
Index
index present
LC call number
PN3331
LC item number
.Z86 2006
Literary form
non fiction
Nature of contents
bibliography
Series statement
Theory and interpretation of narrative
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Fiction
  • Fiction
  • Books and reading
  • Cognitive science
Label
Why we read fiction : theory of mind and the novel, Lisa Zunshine
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 165-192) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The relationship between a "cognitive" analysis of Mrs. Dalloway and the larger field of literary studies
  • Woolf, Pinker, and the project of interdisciplinarity
  • pt. 2.
  • Tracking minds. Whose thought is it, anyway?
  • Metarepresentational ability and schizophrenia
  • Everyday failures of source-monitoring
  • Monitoring fictional states of mind
  • "Fictional" and "history"
  • Tracking minds in Beowulf
  • Don Quixote and his progeny
  • pt. 1.
  • Source-monitoring, ToM, and the figure of the unreliable narrator
  • Source-monitoring and the implied author
  • Richardson's Clarissa : the progress of the elated bridegroom
  • Nabokov's Lolita : the deadly demon meets and destroys the tenderhearted boy
  • pt. 3.
  • Concealing minds. ToM and the detective novel : what does it take to suspect everybody?
  • Why is reading a detective story a lot like lifting weights at the gym?
  • Metarepresentationality and some recurrent patterns of the detective story
  • A cognitive evolutionary perspective : always historicize!
  • Conclusion :
  • Attributing minds. Why did Peter Walsh tremble?
  • why do we read (and write) fiction? Authors meet their readers
  • Is this why we read fiction? surely, there is more to it!
  • What is mind-reading (also known as theory of mind)?
  • Theory of mind, autism, and fiction : four caveats
  • "Effortless" mind-reading
  • Why do we read fiction?
  • The novel as a cognitive experiment
  • Can cognitive science tell us why we are afraid of Mrs. Dalloway?
Control code
61879625
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
x, 198 pages
Isbn
9780814251515
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
2005028358
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations
Label
Why we read fiction : theory of mind and the novel, Lisa Zunshine
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 165-192) and index
Carrier category
volume
Carrier category code
  • nc
Carrier MARC source
rdacarrier
Content category
text
Content type code
  • txt
Content type MARC source
rdacontent
Contents
  • The relationship between a "cognitive" analysis of Mrs. Dalloway and the larger field of literary studies
  • Woolf, Pinker, and the project of interdisciplinarity
  • pt. 2.
  • Tracking minds. Whose thought is it, anyway?
  • Metarepresentational ability and schizophrenia
  • Everyday failures of source-monitoring
  • Monitoring fictional states of mind
  • "Fictional" and "history"
  • Tracking minds in Beowulf
  • Don Quixote and his progeny
  • pt. 1.
  • Source-monitoring, ToM, and the figure of the unreliable narrator
  • Source-monitoring and the implied author
  • Richardson's Clarissa : the progress of the elated bridegroom
  • Nabokov's Lolita : the deadly demon meets and destroys the tenderhearted boy
  • pt. 3.
  • Concealing minds. ToM and the detective novel : what does it take to suspect everybody?
  • Why is reading a detective story a lot like lifting weights at the gym?
  • Metarepresentationality and some recurrent patterns of the detective story
  • A cognitive evolutionary perspective : always historicize!
  • Conclusion :
  • Attributing minds. Why did Peter Walsh tremble?
  • why do we read (and write) fiction? Authors meet their readers
  • Is this why we read fiction? surely, there is more to it!
  • What is mind-reading (also known as theory of mind)?
  • Theory of mind, autism, and fiction : four caveats
  • "Effortless" mind-reading
  • Why do we read fiction?
  • The novel as a cognitive experiment
  • Can cognitive science tell us why we are afraid of Mrs. Dalloway?
Control code
61879625
Dimensions
24 cm
Extent
x, 198 pages
Isbn
9780814251515
Isbn Type
(pbk. : alk. paper)
Lccn
2005028358
Media category
unmediated
Media MARC source
rdamedia
Media type code
  • n
Other physical details
illustrations

Library Locations

    • Thomas Jefferson LibraryBorrow it
      1 University Blvd, St. Louis, MO, 63121, US
      38.710138 -90.311107
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