Coverart for item
The Resource Working toward better pay : earnings dynamics in Ghana and Tanzania, Paolo Falco, Andrew Kerr, Pierella Paci, and Bob Rijkers, (electronic resource)

Working toward better pay : earnings dynamics in Ghana and Tanzania, Paolo Falco, Andrew Kerr, Pierella Paci, and Bob Rijkers, (electronic resource)

Label
Working toward better pay : earnings dynamics in Ghana and Tanzania
Title
Working toward better pay
Title remainder
earnings dynamics in Ghana and Tanzania
Statement of responsibility
Paolo Falco, Andrew Kerr, Pierella Paci, and Bob Rijkers
Creator
Contributor
Subject
Language
eng
Summary
  • Improving the returns to labor for low-paid workers is a key policy challenge, especially in low-income countries (LICs) where earnings increases are the single most important source of poverty reduction and an important engine of shared prosperity. Yet, the understanding of individual earnings dynamics remains limited. The small--but growing--body of empirical literature on the factors leading to larger and faster pay increases points to strong persistence in earnings over time. However, it remains unclear to what extent this is due to differences in individual endowments rather than to the fact that being in low-paying jobs itself undermines future earnings prospects, and to what extent determinants of earnings vary across types of activities and sectors. The knowledge gap is particularly large for LICs due to the limited availability of reliable panel data. This study uses unusually rich longitudinal data from Ghana and Tanzania to identify engines of, and barriers to, earnings and earnings mobility. It examines the relative role of individual endowments--such as gender, age, and skills--and characteristics of the job, but also focuses on the role of job switches--for example, moves into and out of self-employment. The analysis also zooms in on the drivers of transitions between low-paying and high-paying jobs and addresses questions such as whether being low paid is a transitory or permanent phenomenon, and whether it has a scarring effect on an individual's employment prospects. The extent to which earnings dynamics differ for women and young adults is also discussed in detail. Tanzania and Ghana provide a particularly relevant context in which to examine these issues and the cross-country comparison helps shed light on the institutional factors that promote labor market mobility and entrepreneurship
  • Improving the returns to labor for low-paid workers is a key policy challenge, especially in low-income countries (LICs) where earnings increases are the single most important source of poverty reduction and an important engine of shared prosperity. Yet, the understanding of individual earnings dynamics remains limited. The small--but growing--body of empirical literature on the factors leading to larger and faster pay increases points to strong persistence in earnings over time. However, it remains unclear to what extent this is due to differences in individual endowments rather than to the fact that being in low-paying jobs itself undermines future earnings prospects, and to what extent determinants of earnings vary across types of activities and sectors. The knowledge gap is particularly large for LICs due to the limited availability of reliable panel data. This study uses unusually rich longitudinal data from Ghana and Tanzania to identify engines of, and barriers to, earnings and earnings mobility. It examines the relative role of individual endowments--such as gender, age, and skills--and characteristics of the job, but also focuses on the role of job switches--for example, moves into and out of self-employment. The analysis also zooms in on the drivers of transitions between low-paying and high-paying jobs and addresses questions such as whether being low paid is a transitory or permanent phenomenon, and whether it has a scarring effect on an individual's employment prospects. The extent to which earnings dynamics differ for women and young adults is also discussed in detail. Tanzania and Ghana provide a particularly relevant context in which to examine these issues and the cross-country comparison helps shed light on the institutional factors that promote labor market mobility and entrepreneurship
  • Improving the returns to labor for low-paid workers is a key policy challenge, especially in low-income countries (LICs) where earnings increases are the single most important source of poverty reduction and an important engine of shared prosperity. Yet, the understanding of individual earnings dynamics remains limited. The small--but growing--body of empirical literature on the factors leading to larger and faster pay increases points to strong persistence in earnings over time. However, it remains unclear to what extent this is due to differences in individual endowments rather than to the fact that being in low-paying jobs itself undermines future earnings prospects, and to what extent determinants of earnings vary across types of activities and sectors. The knowledge gap is particularly large for LICs due to the limited availability of reliable panel data. This study uses unusually rich longitudinal data from Ghana and Tanzania to identify engines of, and barriers to, earnings and earnings mobility. It examines the relative role of individual endowments--such as gender, age, and skills--and characteristics of the job, but also focuses on the role of job switches--for example, moves into and out of self-employment. The analysis also zooms in on the drivers of transitions between low-paying and high-paying jobs and addresses questions such as whether being low paid is a transitory or permanent phenomenon, and whether it has a scarring effect on an individual's employment prospects. The extent to which earnings dynamics differ for women and young adults is also discussed in detail. Tanzania and Ghana provide a particularly relevant context in which to examine these issues and the cross-country comparison helps shed light on the institutional factors that promote labor market mobility and entrepreneurship
Member of
Cataloging source
CSL
http://library.link/vocab/creatorName
Falco, Paolo
Dewey number
331.2/9667
LC call number
HD5098.3
LC item number
.F35 2014
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorDate
  • 1982-
  • 1957-
http://library.link/vocab/relatedWorkOrContributorName
  • Kerr, Andrew
  • Paci, Pierella
  • Rijkers, Bob
Series statement
World Bank study
http://library.link/vocab/subjectName
  • Wages
  • Wages
  • Wages
  • Wages
  • Wages
  • Wages
  • Ghana
  • Tanzania
Label
Working toward better pay : earnings dynamics in Ghana and Tanzania, Paolo Falco, Andrew Kerr, Pierella Paci, and Bob Rijkers, (electronic resource)
Instantiates
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 79-80)
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001294498
Dimensions
25 cm.
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xiii, 80 pages
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9781464802072
Lccn
2012361505
Note
Electronic reproduction. Palo Alto, Calif. : ebrary, 2014. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ebrary affiliated libraries.
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0001294498
Label
Working toward better pay : earnings dynamics in Ghana and Tanzania, Paolo Falco, Andrew Kerr, Pierella Paci, and Bob Rijkers, (electronic resource)
Publication
Bibliography note
Includes bibliographical references (pages 79-80)
Control code
OCM1bookssj0001294498
Dimensions
25 cm.
Dimensions
unknown
Extent
xiii, 80 pages
Governing access note
License restrictions may limit access
Isbn
9781464802072
Lccn
2012361505
Note
Electronic reproduction. Palo Alto, Calif. : ebrary, 2014. Available via World Wide Web. Access may be limited to ebrary affiliated libraries.
Other physical details
illustrations
Specific material designation
remote
System control number
(WaSeSS)ssj0001294498

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